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Remington 700 for beginner,recommendation?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by LunaRain, Jan 29, 2019.

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  1. BWS

    BWS Member

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    One consideration is unloading a hunting rifle.

    "Blind" magazines require running the loaded rounds,at least partially up through the action to eject. A hinged floorplate allows for a quick dumping out the bttm. Further,and not busting on them.... just sayin,detachable mags can get lost,popped loose,whatever.

    So look at these features when evaluating a hunting bolt action.
     
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  2. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    A Thirty Aught Six is never a mistake.:D

    Having said that, a (sigh) Six and a half Creedmoor fits the bill. Less expensive to practice, factory match, practice and hunting loads, Elk capable.

    A bolt rifle, I think, is more practical. More adept to teaching the pure essence of marksman ship. Shooting positions, transport, care. When the barrel is worn out you may be an excellent marksman.

    I say this with one centerfire turn bolt and four ARs, and five pump rifles...:confused: Be careful, they can get out of hand quickly.:)

    Nine hundred in the scope and rifle can yeild a very nice combination, in want of nothing. I think a, relatively, more expensive scope on an entry level rifle is more capable than most humans are.

    Howas and Savages come in scope combos that, while not the most premium, are very serviceable for a first rifle. They will leave only money on the table, that can be used for ammunition. They will hunt hard, shoot well and if they get..."learned with", won't hurt wallets or pride to badly.

    I "learned with" my Ruger MKiii that a pocket is not where a pistol goes when crossing a crik. Pull up the coat and use the holster, or pull up the pistol, out of the crik...:(:D

    Keep us posted on your decision. Everyone likes target pictures, good and bad ones, and hunting pictures. And obviously pics of the new (or used, great deals there) rifle!
     
  3. tark

    tark Member

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    When Les was still making ARs we sent one to a gun writer, in 204 Ruger. It was a heavy barreled Varmint gun. He shot a ten round two and one half inch group with it......

    At 600 yards. Off the bench. No machine rest.

    Kind of hard to beat that..... And there were no special techniques or hand fitting used. Just use quality parts and assemble them correctly. I know of no other rifle of any action type that is easier to build and customize.
     
  4. Galil5.56

    Galil5.56 Member

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    My first rifle was a Rem 700 ADL in 06, and even today I love shooting it. It wears a Burris 2-7x scope, was very accurate out of the box with almost anything I can stuff in its blind magazine, looks nice, super fast lock time, and has a great trigger after some adjustment. I bought it new 37 years ago when Remington quality/fit finish was very good IMO and experience, and can not comment on current production.

    Only issue after many thousands of rounds sent downrange (mostly cast bullet loads), was the riveted in place extractor broke and was easily fixed at the time. They may be boringly common with no snob appeal, but that just means there is a near infinite ways to make it your own via the aftermarket for little cost, and few if any rifles made are as strong (my Arisaka type 99 hates me for saying this ;) ) or stronger, with great action safety by virtue of "three rings of steel". Real classic that you can never go wrong with.
     
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  5. Telekinesis

    Telekinesis Member

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    I don't think anyone is debating that an AR has the potential to be very accurate, just that when you compare off the rack guns that fit within the OP's stated budget, generally bolt guns are going to perform better. That .204 Ruger Varmint gun is not your standard off the rack, sub $1000 AR.

    I've also seen a stock RPR (with handloads) make 1/2 MOA groups similar to the AR you mention. With a new (better) barrel the gun now shoots consistent 1/4-1/2 MOA groups. (Note that I'm not the shooter - the rifle belongs to a friend who shoots F Class and other rifle competitions. He's a much better shot than I am.)
     
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  6. Captcurt

    Captcurt Member

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    It is hard to pick a gun or caliber for someone else. It is like asking if a tall redhead is better than a short blond. They all have there place.

    I agree with several on here that a bolt gun will cover nearly anything that you want to do and with a better selection of calibers. A new Rem 700 can be had for as little as $400 for an ADL. I even got one for $350 with a scope. It is a 243 and shoots cloverleafs. The stock is a flimsy synthetic but I would have to look a long time to find anything that would shoot better. The Bergara is a 700 done right, but it is twice the price of a Rem ADL. Savage guns are similar in that you can buy a cheaper package gun like the Model 11 Trophy Hunter package for $400 or put double the money in a Model 16. It is your call.

    The old 30-06 is tried and true, but a day at the bench can leave you with a tender shoulder. Some people can take it and some can't. A 6.5 CM is cheap to shoot and will have less recoil, but you can say that about a 243, 260, 6.5X55 or 7mm-08. Pick the gun you like , flip a coin as to caliber and go have some fun.
     
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  7. tark

    tark Member

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    Good points, TK. The dealer price on that AR was around $2,500. :what: But I still have my doubts about which type has the better out-of-the box accuracy, within the OPs budget.

    I have a lowly Bushmaster M-4 that I bought three years ago. Not the worst AR but far from the best. Got it for $650. It shoots inch groups at a hundred yards with M-193 surplus ammo. It is dead stock, with the carrying handle and no optics. Standard aperture rear sight. That's pretty hard to beat...
     
  8. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    Yeah, it’s obvious the AR is the more accurate platform, considering how many world benchrest and F class records are held by AR’s...

    No... wait...
     
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  9. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

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    @Captcurt, I think we can all agree that short or tall, redheads have no place in a sane man’s life :rofl:

    A few points to consider before my standard advice:

    1. Know the law. Washington has just recently passed rather draconian (translation: super bad) laws restricting AR ownership to include special training requirements and age restrictions.

    2. Know the hunting regulations. While I do not hail from Washington I have 3 brother-in-laws who were born and raised there. They all hunt deer/elk, they all use turn bolts, and I would definitely check to make sure that ARs are allowable and with what magazine limit.

    Now for my other .02:

    Forget hunting just yet and buy a .22 rimfire. Find someone, anyone willing to help you learn or come back here and ask questions. Good practice is what’s needed as practice makes permanent (not perfect). If you can afford the pricier ammo of a .17 then by all means buy that instead and stretch your shooting to 150+ yards as you progress.

    When you’re confident that you can manage that first rifle, and because you’ll have a local mentor, ask their advice on caliber, brand, scope mounting, scope magnification, etc. If they’re not completely confident in that arena, come back here, ask questions, find online resources.

    Finally, I don’t ever recommend big game hunting alone. Washington terrain can be dangerous, carrying out large game can be difficult, and getting lost on a mountain when no one knows you’re even there is life threatening. Until you’ve secured a solid plan, there’s no sense in securing a solid hunting rig.

    Best of luck to you and welcome to THR.
     
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  10. stillquietvoice

    stillquietvoice Member

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    You may find a hunting partner during one of your classes or at the range. Hope you find someone that is close by and knows your terrain.
     
  11. tark

    tark Member

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    We are talking about guns in the $900 or less range........:D
     
  12. BigBlue 94

    BigBlue 94 Member

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    I bought a Rem700 SPS and a cheaper Leupold scope for not much more than your $900 budget a few years ago. Its .308 caliber.

    I would do a similar type rifle if I were you. It fills the hunting qualification. It will also be cheaper on ammo, due to the "blasting" nature of a semi auto. It'll also improve your marksmanship, because you'll be focusing on accuracy, over just hitting a paper plate a bunch.

    308 is a capable round for both elk and deer. It's also a short action round which can save weight, something very important when at 10,000 feet. Up there, every ounce counts.

    Consider an "all weather rifle" with at least a composite stock, stainless if possible. The mountain weather can take a beating on a wood stocked rifle, unless the utmost care is taken when cleaning.

    Last of all, finally, Welcome to America! Responsibly owning a firearm, especially a hunting rifle, is one big part of being American. Imho
     
  13. LunaRain

    LunaRain Member

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    I know the i1639 that classifies semi auto rifles as assault weapon. I don’t like the misconception about semiautomatic rifles the initiative implies. but additional safety certificate, background checks, fees and records are acceptable to me.o_O I am not going to hunt alone. I haven’t killed or field dressing anything other than Arthropodas and tadpoles(not even fish). I don’t want to waste any meats because of that, wildlife deserves respect.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2019
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  14. JRWhit

    JRWhit Member

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    For what it's worth, I'd wait on spending much on either rifle. If your just getting started then buy a cheap budget rifle, scope combo. With a budget of $900 you could easily get into a bolt action scoped and an AR entry level.
    Your just getting started and fact is your not going to know what you like and what your most comfortable/effective with until you've logged a lot of range/hunting time. Once you've found the little quarks that suite you then I'd look at a some nicer rifles, but buying a high dollar one now might lead to regret or time/money spent in the wrong direction.
    It will be better to discover these things on a budget rifle. Most manufacturers have scope rifle combos that range from $300-$500. Many AR manufacturers have rebates and sales that will get you an AR in that same range. Just remember that with the AR you must make sure there are no magazine limits or bullet limits for hunting in your state. In mine it is illegal to hunt with a magazine that holds for than 10. Easily remedied but key to know.
     
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  15. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    I’ve never seen a benefit of buying twice. A budget rifle won’t hold value as well as a nicer rifle, so when you do figure out all of the things you don’t like about that budget rifle - which may or may not have applied to a nicer rifle - you’re out that money. The combo scope is going to suck, no way around it, so that’s wasted money from the jump. The stock is going to suck, and the finish on the rifle is going to be ugly - these are the things which make them inexpensive. A guy doesn’t have to take a bite of a poop sandwich to know he won’t enjoy it.
     
  16. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    I totally agree.
     
  17. mainecoon

    mainecoon Member

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  18. illinoisburt

    illinoisburt Member

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    There is value in this idea (there are package deals which have decent glass like a weaver kaspa or vortex crossfire scope), but have to be selective and as always handle the rifles to see if they fit and are comfortable to hold amd operate smoothly. Most of the $300 packages do not fit this criteria.

    His home state of Washington is not very AR friendly and few ARs on the budget end of the line are found in elk suitable calibers.

    Price is a funny thing these days. If he bought a new laminate Remington ADL with 3-9x40 crossfire ii for $500 from a big box store (there was a bunch of fall sales at this price) in 308, there's a very good chance it would hold most of its value and work just fine for the next 20 years. So knocking the guns on price alone is kind of silly.
     
  19. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    It hasn’t been my experience that budget rifles of the last 20yrs - any single year there within - has held its value, so I don’t know why someone would be silly enough to think consumers will change capitalist market trends which have spanned generations. When a new rifle is available for the same or lesser cost, why buy an old one of no better quality? And of course, ignoring the fact 20yrs from now, a $500 2019 rifle selling for $500 is a ~$250 value loss is kinda silly too...

    I didn’t knock the rifles based on cost - I knock crappy combo rifles based on being crappy, and I was very specific about what about them sucks.
     
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  20. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    Definitely a subjective subject, neither scope has decent glass to my eyes.
     
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  21. Sappyg2.0

    Sappyg2.0 Member

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    ... I just reread all posts by the OP. It's not the rifle that's the issue. Its shooting. A 700 in 30-06 is quite different than an AR in 556. An edited 1st post suggests deer hunting. Somewhat boring if you ask me but there you have it.

    On the face I would still suggest a budget rifle, RAR would be my choice yet, skylerbone makes a better case for a 22lr. Developing skill with a 22 is better than chasing after some damn deer with with a 30-06 God knows where.

    Trigger time is what's called for in a 1st rifle. What better way to get that than with a 22? Ammo is cheap and you have the rest of your life to hunt deer.

    Shoot, come to think of it, my wife is supposedly Auburn and my daughter is probably blond... it may be time to take up hunting again:thumbdown:
     
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  22. d2wing

    d2wing Member

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    I currently have a Tikka in 7-08, but I have had Remington 700's in various calibers and they were all accurate and reliable. If you don't mind some recoil I recommend the 30-06 as it is a classic and never a bad choice for big game. But 308 is great too.
    I have killed several big deer with an AR in .223. As long as you can hit the heart or close with either cartridge you will be fine. The 30-06 or 308 in a 700 will give you much more range , power for big game and more options on shot angles. As others have said there's lots of good choices .
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2019
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  23. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    How much did they cost you?
     
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  24. illinoisburt

    illinoisburt Member

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    Not everyone is a shooter. In fact, I would strongly argue far and away the majority of hunters aren't dedicated shooters. Hunting is the important activity, shooting is just a couple seconds per season. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that. If anything, many of the consistently successful hunters I've known were absolute fudds who knew very little about their guns other than some basic form. They don't see the point of shooting a whole bunch of ammo when the gun is already sighted in and likely to hit close enough to where they aim. If that is the OP's desire, why knock it? Get a dependable rifle/scope combo, shoot enough to feel comfortable with it, and put your real time and effort into planning, scouting, and enjoying the outdoors.
     
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  25. mustanger98

    mustanger98 Member

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    As noted, there is a difference between hunting and shooting.

    We know the OP is living in the Tacoma, WA area. But, where is he from? The way the posts read suggests Eastern Europe. Some of those countries have apprenticeships to go from bird hunter to big game hunter. That's not so much about ability to shoot, although that helps, as it is about field craft and knowing the animals and the ecosystem. Over there, when you're known as a hunter, you're known as a thinking man.

    Okay, now for rifles... why not get a CZ452 in .22LR? The version I'm thinking of has a rear tangent sight and Bavarian style stock. It's a nice adult-size rifle. A good .22LR can get you some good range time without your big game rifle's recoil.

    The crankbolt big game rifle... .308 and .30-06 are both known to be excellent choices for deer and elk. I know the talk about using .243's and different 6.5's on elk, but seriously, why not use a .30cal? The .30-06 is a versatile classic. I'd recommend learning to shoot it with a good set of iron sights before doing anything with a scope.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2019
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