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Remington 700 vs. Ruger 77

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Ninja42, Nov 10, 2008.

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  1. Ninja42

    Ninja42 Member

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    Ive wanted a boltgun for the longest time now, and this winter it finally seems like I will be able to afford it, so I took the liberty of checking out the market, and after thorough speculations I am now copletely torn between two seemingly excellent guns :(

    I will be using this gun almost exclusively as a hunting rifle, and as I want to be able to take fairly long shots with it I will be using it with a scope. The rifle I will either be chambered in .308 or .30-06, it will be made from blued steel and walnut, and I want it to be ready for work out of the box if at all possible.

    Can you guys help me pointing out the advantages and disadvantages of either gun? I would also love some recommendations on a good scope? Money is an issue here, so I cant just get both, but not so much of an issue that I will choose the ruger over the remington for it, unless the general consensus is that the rifles are equally good.
     
  2. jbech123

    jbech123 Member

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    Of these 2 brands...

    Individual guns will vary, but on the whole, the Remingtons will be a tad more accurate. There are Remington's that will shoot bad, and ruger's that will shoot 1/2" out of the box, but overall the remmy's are a bit more accurate. I personally have owned 4 ruger's and 10+ Remmy's and found this to be true. That said, the difference for hunting applications out to 300 yards or so is negligable. So it depends on what you plan to use it for. If you want to punch paper out past 400 yards, the remmy may be better. For hunting, I'd personally take a ruger. The ruger has controlled round feed and most remmy's are push feed. Not a huge factor on a deer rifle but there are advantages. The main thing I hate about a remmy for hardcore hunting is that the bolt doesn't lock, so if you are climbing through thick stuff the bolt handle catches on stuff and is always coming open. Non-issue with the ruger, the bolt is locked when the safety is on.
     
  3. aka108

    aka108 Member

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    Rugers have, in my experience, not been the most accurate out of the box rifles. Remingtons have been very good. I know some with differ with my opinion but just giving you may take on it. I've sold off most of the Rugers I've owned and won't be buying any more.
     
  4. Shawnee

    Shawnee member

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    Have owned at least eight 700s and four 77s. Both have always been very good rifles. My 700s have consistantly shot slightly better groups than the 77s. Have had to have minor repairs done on two of the 77s and have had no repairs needed on the 700s. All but one of the Remington triggers have been better than any of the 77 triggers.

    Hard to beat a Nikon Buckmaster scope for value/price/warrenty.


    Good Luck !

    :cool:
     
  5. Brad Clodfelter

    Brad Clodfelter Member

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    The Reminton 700BDL would be my choice.
     
  6. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    My vote is None of the Above.

    Remingtons need aftermarket safeties to be used for hunting, unless you hunt from a luxury stand. They're also expensive, for what they are.

    Rugers have a reputation for spotty accuracy. I haven't bought any, but a recent Gun Tests review found that this was still true for the supposedly improved "Hawkeye" gun they bought.

    If you want a basic push-feed hunting rifle, Weatherby's Vanguard is every bit as good as the Remington, they tell you how to adjust the trigger (not "certified technician only" crap), and it has a bolt-locking safety. They're very accurate rifles. I have the Sporter in .30-06 and it's a great piece, out of the box. I put a Burris Fullfield II on it, sighted it in, and used it.

    Savage's Accu-Trigger, if you like it, provides a wonderful trigger pull with no dinking around necessary. Their guns are light, economical, and accurate.

    Winchester makes the Model 70 again. I'd like a Featherweight. Wonderful rifle, with wonderful handling.
     
  7. Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow

    Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow member

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    Yes, I too would like to know *how we got down to* these two final choices - by what criteria did you eliminate the Vanguard/Howa, the CZ 550, the Savage 14, the Winchester 70, and the Browning A-bolt & X-bolt? But without knowing more, of those two choices, I would definitely go wtih the Remington 700 in some variety such as the 700 CDL (or a Remington model Seven if going with .308).

    For a beauteous wood & blued, I like CZ 550 the best, followed by Remington 700 CDL (or Remington Seven CDL), Winchester 70 Featherweight, Browning A-bolt, Weatherby Vanguard Deluxe, and Savage 14 Classic. I would never purchase another Ruger.
     
  8. Brad Clodfelter

    Brad Clodfelter Member

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    It's just hard to beat a Remington 700BDL. Still the best looking bolt action in my opinion for the price. It's also the best selling.

    Here's my son's 700BDL 25-06. This gun will stack bullets at 100yds.

    Rem700BDL25-06Medium.gif
     
  9. Horsemany

    Horsemany Member

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    I've never had a Rem 700 bolt open up accidentally. I grew up deer hunting central/northern Wisconsin in brush so thick you had to wack backwards and push your way through. The 700 bolt actually has a fairly stiff spring to get the bolt lifted. I'd like to see how many people that's actually happened to.
     
  10. blarney

    blarney Member

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    Rem700
     
  11. jbech123

    jbech123 Member

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    I just returned from a Utah hunt, semiopen terrain but a lot of oak brush to get through. It happened to me at least 10 times on a 7 day hunt. Not the end of the world or anything, but annoying for sure. I like remingtons and own several, but this has happened to me many times.
     
  12. Horsemany

    Horsemany Member

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    Quote:
    I've never had a Rem 700 bolt open up accidentally. I grew up deer hunting central/northern Wisconsin in brush so thick you had to wack backwards and push your way through. The 700 bolt actually has a fairly stiff spring to get the bolt lifted. I'd like to see how many people that's actually happened to.

    I find that VERY hard to believe. I've hunted with others using 700's and used them myself for the last 20 years. It's never happened to me or anyone I've hunted with once. Like clockwork though there's always someone here who wants to rub your nose in it. Were you chopping camp wood with it?
     
  13. Omaha-BeenGlockin

    Omaha-BeenGlockin Member

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    Have been in the process of the last week or so to get a new bolt action.

    I wanted stainless--reasonably priced and American made.

    I bought the Ruger.

    I'd rate the Remington a notch or two below Savage in materials and fit and finish these days and I consider Savage god-awfull nasty.

    In the sub $700 range---nothing beats the Ruger currently.
     
  14. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Horsemany, unless you work for Remington, why do you take this personally? Nobody was rubbing anyone's nose in anything.

    Besides, you can get an aftermarket 3-position safety AFAIK.

    The question to me is, why, on rifles that Remington is charging a pretty penny for these days, should you have to spend extra money to get a feature that every other rifle includes from the factory (not to mention that Remington warranty service is known for returning everything to "factory condition" including replacing 'smited triggers, etc.)?
     
  15. MT GUNNY

    MT GUNNY Member

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    Armed Bear [QUOTERemingtons need aftermarket safeties to be used for hunting, ][/QUOTE]

    Could you explain this ? I've hunted for years with a Rem 700 (3) and Never had a safety Issue.







    View attachment 87535
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2008
  16. Geno
    • Contributing Member

    Geno Member

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    Between the two, I say Remington (per experience). However, I suggest the Weatherby Vanguard over both. For $425.00, where else will you find a 100% forged barrelled action, and a factory target assuring that the rifle is 1.5 MOA accurate.
     
  17. Horsemany

    Horsemany Member

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    Armed Bear

    I do not work for Remington and I own both Rugers and Remingtons. My issue is this; no matter what you say on this forum, there are ALWAYS folks lurking waiting to prove you wrong. One must generalize about a lot of the topics here. That means there will always be exceptions. As a general rule the fact the bolt does not lock on ANY rifle means nothing to me. In fact I prefer a simpler SAFE or NOT SAFE type safety. And that's coming from someone who collects pre-64 model 70's, the original 3 position safety guns. I don't care if people here disagree. THis is an opinion forum. Some members only add to the discussion to try to prove someone else wrong. I'm positive if we conducted a poll of everyone who hunts with 700's there would be damn few who've ever had the bolt open on accident. I'm not saying 700's are perfect. I've ripped them enough in my day. But in the list of negatives about 700's this isn't one of them IMO. Thank you for your concern ArmedBear.
     
  18. Shawnee

    Shawnee member

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    Not meaning to throw any gasoline on the fire but I've used 700s a lot for many years and this is the first I've heard of the bolt coming open all by itself.
    Won't say it doesn't happen to someone somewhere - just that this is the first I've ever heard of it.

    :cool:
     
  19. VINTAGE-SLOTCARS

    VINTAGE-SLOTCARS Member

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    +1 Remington 700 bdl
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2008
  20. Reid73

    Reid73 Member

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    Rugers are very reliable firearms but usually boast only mediocre accuracy, and will almost certainly require a fair bit of tuning. Please note that their (non-adjustable) triggers are terrible; plan on spending $50-$100 for a replacement trigger, plus a gunsmithing fee if you don't want to do the installation yourself.

    I'm not a big Remington fan. Like Ruger, the factory is always trying to skimp on fit and finish because most customers are too cheap to pay for quality. Fair enough, but there's no such thing as a free lunch.

    The 700 is not nearly as visually attractive as a 77, at least to my eye. The compact 77RSI model would be my choice in a Ruger.

    You should be aware that the 77 and 700 are are essentially budget rifles. I realize that "money is an issue here", but if I were in your shoes I would save up and buy a better product (e.g. Weatherby Vanguard Sporter, Browning X-bolt, CZ 550). Personally, I'd rather one good rifle than a collection of two or three mediocre ones. In firearms, you tend to get what you pay for.

    You might consider shopping around for a secondhand Mark V, Sako, Husqvarna, Kimber or equivalent. This article, this article and this article may help.

    The choice of scope is up to you, but FWIW you really can't go far wrong buying Leopold. Cheap optics are usually a terrible way to save money, although some of the Bushnell Banner scopes aren't bad.

    Anything is possible, and since you say it has happened, I for one accept that. I must say that I am surprised to hear it, though.
     
  21. CRITGIT

    CRITGIT member

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    For years my Ruger77 MKII in.22-250 got sand kicked in it's face by my shooting buddies with their Rem 700's. After some judicious "load work ups" and seating depth measurements the once 90lb weakling Ruger now kicks Rem 700 butt....bad!
    Loads and seating depth are of paramount importance!

    CRITGIT
     
  22. Girodin

    Girodin Member

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    I've never had a Remington 700 bolt open in a fair amount of hunting with one. I'm not saying it doesn't happen but in twelve years of hunting I've never experienced it.
     
  23. KINGMAX

    KINGMAX Member

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    Remi 700 adl

    I have a REMI 700 ADL in .270. I really like mine. It has been one great rifle, no problems.
     
  24. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    I have one Ruger M77 in 308, a 26" barreled varmit model, I have two Remington 700's ADL's, one in 30-06.

    My Ruger has a non adjustable two stage trigger. It had creep, I took the trigger apart, short story, it was a horrible experience. I removed the offending burr, and once assembled, the trigger is great.

    My 700's have adjustable triggers, and I have adjusted them to 2.5 pound pulls and they are great.

    My Ruger is capable of target grade accuracy. My Remingtons are plenty accurate for hunting rifles.

    Both actions are examples of excellent design. Both are smooth safe actions. The Remington action has been made since the late 40's, it has shown itself to be a durable action. The trigger mechanism has had its problems, and Remington recently replaced the old mechanism. My M700's are smooth operating rifles.

    Ruger has consistantly improved the M77 action, I like the three position safety, the claw extractor, various little stuff. Ruger hit a home run with this action.

    Both actions have to be bedded to reach the potential of the barrels. Today I am finishing the bedding of a laminated stock for the M700 in 30-06. When I bedded the other M700, it improved the accuracy of the rifle around 50%. When I bedded the Ruger (which is a real pain to bed, that angled front tang screw makes it a mess) it brought groups from 1.0/1.25 MOA close to half MOA.

    My opinion, go to the store and handle the rifles. Pick the one that puts your hand in a good firing position, a comfortable stock, and one that has the best trigger.

    Or, toss a coin. ;)
     
  25. targshooter

    targshooter Member

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    Ruger for most applications

    I have several Ruger Model 77 bolt rifles on hand (7), and all but one are as accurate as the average Remington I've owned. Before Ruger made their own barrels I had a dog; but for the past 15+ years I've had as good results from them as anyone. That said, the most accurate hunting rifle I ever owned was a Remington, the least accurate a Winchester. I used to do some long term (3weeks to a month, a days treck from the logging road) wilderness hunting, and the Winchesters and Rugers with their claw extractors could be counted on to remove verdigris coated ammo from the chamber, whereas the Remington extractor could not. For the average hunter with the ability to keep the ammo dry and wiped down, this is not an issue. For the usual big game hunt where the shot is limited to 300 to a max of 350 yards, I would choose either. For longer distances or small targets, I would buy a custom rifle with a guarantee of at least .5MOA accuracy.
     
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