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Remington 700

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by sprice, Mar 20, 2011.

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  1. sprice

    sprice Member

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    Whats a good pillar bedded or full length bedding block rifle stock for a remington 700 that will free float a standard barrel, is synthetic, lightweight and utilizes a varmint/wide style handguard?

    So far I've found the Blackhawk Axiom http://www.blackhawk.com/product/Axiom-TH-Thumbhole-Rifle-Stock,1526,166.htm.

    I also like bell and carlson but can't seem to find one that matches what I would like.

    Links and other opinions are most welcome.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2011
  2. Durty

    Durty Member

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    Check out McMillan stocks. They are very good but expect to pay around $500
     
  3. JDMorris

    JDMorris Member

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    Bell and Carlson, McMillan, H-S Precision... Any tactical style stock should have a wide forend, and a heavy barrel cut channel, that will leave plenty of floating space for a standard barrel.
     
  4. Durty

    Durty Member

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    Yes that reminds me- HS Precision makes the stocks that Remington puts on the Sendero. It's a nice stock with a beavertail forearm and a comfy palm swell.
     
  5. JDMorris

    JDMorris Member

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    Why are you asking about a standard contour barrel? Just curious..
     
  6. sprice

    sprice Member

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    It's lighter and cheaper and when I replace the barrel I'm going to get a standard contour carbon fiber and the bull barrel offers no significant increase in accuracy.
     
  7. JDMorris

    JDMorris Member

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    I somewhat agree, I have a standard barrel .308 Howa 1500 that is sub-MOA, but I do think that a heavy barrel does help when shooting groups due to is not heating up as fast.. but do what you want, I think the advantage of the heavy barrel isn't seen until a group is attempted to be shot in a fairly quick succesion, and the sporter barrel gets so hot you'll grill skin touching it..
    I do believe a bull barreled rifle will have a better accuracy out of the box than a standard, and even more if you test a batch, I got lucky with my Howa, will you get lucky with a barrel that has very good harmonics?
    I'm just saying, I regret not getting a heavy barreled Howa, I just got lucky with the accuracy I guess, but I love that SPS .223 Tactical.
     
  8. Hangingrock

    Hangingrock Member

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    This rifle started out life as a Remington 700 but is much modified for across the course shooting. Basically it’s my short course rifle. The barrel is entering the twilight of it career so I thought. To check the accuracy I removed the metallic match sights and mounted a slave scope for testing. The group is (20) shot total. While not rapid fire but not slow fire. I believe the barrel contour is a contributing factor.
     
  9. snake284

    snake284 Member

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    I can do what you want with a standard factory stock that the rifle came in. But I don't use pillar blocks as such. Back in the day, bench rest shooters used to make pillars when they bedded the action with epoxy. All you had to do was first, bed the action, the recoil lug and about the chamber's length of the barrel out. Then drill out the stock at the bolt holes, the front hole to 3/4 inch and the rear hole since it goes through the tang, to about 1/2 or 5/8ths. Then fill these holes with the epoxy and let it cure. Then when it is fully cured, about a week, use a drill press and drill the holes out where the bolts won't touch the sides. These are your pillars and if you use a good metal base epoxy it will be about as strong as a pillar, and certainally strong enough to be used as pillars. And it doesn't add as much weigth.
     
  10. NELSONs02

    NELSONs02 Member

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    McMillan bedded by someone who knows what they're doing.
     
  11. WNTFW

    WNTFW Member

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    I addition to what snake284 posted, you can accomplish pillars a few ways. Do the bedding, then the pillars. Do the pillars, then the bedding. Do the pillars and bedding at the same time. You can use epoxy, buy pillars or make them yourself. Couple that with a host of bedding material and clamping options. Now you have variables that wind up give a ton of options. None of the guys that do it for a living agree on the one best way to do the process.
     
  12. cal74

    cal74 Member

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    The Remington LVSF stock might be something you could consider.

    Numrich as well as a few other places usually have it, costs around 200.00. Can be found on different classifieds for 150-170.00 at times.
     
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