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Remington 721 trade

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Gasitman, Jul 21, 2010.

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  1. Gasitman

    Gasitman Member

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  2. mach 2

    mach 2 Member

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    I have no idea what the pistol is worth, but the 721 is probably worth its weight in gold. I have been shooting a Rem 722 (short action) in 22-250 for years. The action is smooth as silk and gives me 1/2 min 5 shot groups.

    Len
     
  3. dakotasin

    dakotasin Member

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    if you hate the pistol, trip it and don't look back.

    for dollar value, remington 721's have increased in price over the last 2 years or so. an average price around here is $350-400.
     
  4. rangerruck

    rangerruck Member

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    DUDE!!! that is no contest, the 721 is one of the most accurate factory rifles ever built. I think it, fireing a 222 cartridge, held the benchrest record for something like over 50 years. If it also has both complete front and rear site sets, those alone are outstanding. Step/block rear site , totally adjustable, with the massive sharkfin front site, fully ramped and lined, with double screw in set screws. If it looks as good as that one in the pic, around here, you couldn't touch that for less than 500 bucks.
    Now then it could have some probs, so you should get a 3 day return guarantee on it, and go fire it. First make sure the safety works; try to fire it
    with it on. Then you should work the trigger several times, make sure it doesn't start to feel like mush-- if they were ill taken care of, they can be nasty if left alone. Fortunately, Timney makes a drop in trigger for this, that is excellent.
     
  5. NCsmitty

    NCsmitty Member

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    Viewing the 721 Rem at the site, it appears that it has a different barrel from original from what I can see. It's probably a M700 replacement.
    The original barrels had the rear sight boss machined into the barrel with a dovetail rear sight.
    It should prove to be a good trade.




    NCsmitty
     
  6. OYE

    OYE Member

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    You may be right NCSmitty. My 721 was made in Aug. of 1948. And it has the rear sight
    boss and dovetail with a very simple rear sight. The front sight is soldered to the barrel.
    That may be one of the later models 721A et al. I think the later models put out in the late 50's were sometimes called transition models and I think the barrels were set up similar to that (I'm not sure though). You might be able to find out on that Remington Society website. You can get the manufacture date from the barrel code there as well. ( The 3 letter code on left side of barrel just in front of the receiver.)

    Assuming the chamber/barrel/ and headspace is o.k., I would think it would be well worth that. Numrich Arms still has a lot of parts for those. The extractor for the 30/06' s
    is the one item that is almost impossible to find ( kind of odd as the extractor for the 300
    H & H caliber turn up quite often). I acquired mine years ago from a relative with less than 200 rounds on the barrel. This gun never would shoot boattail bullets accurately, but shoots flatbase bullets to .3 in. c. to c. ( 100 yds). The boattail thing is just individual to this gun. It was semi retired early on and still has less than 2500 rounds on the barrel. For the What It's Worth Department.

    As an aside, Remington used to offer to machine a new bolt if the extractor would break. Whether they still do or what it cost is beyond me. There are other options as well. That may never be needed of course. Best
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2010
  7. OYE

    OYE Member

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    Remington Dates of Manufacture

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The following serial number information is for
    Remingtion firearms manufactured after 1921

    Remingtons manufactured after 1921 have a code located on the left side of the barrel near the frame that identifies the year and month of manufacture. The following letters correspond to the months of the year, for example B=January, L= February and so on:

    B - L - A - C - K - P - O - W - D - E - R - X

    Barrel Code Location Diagram



    Serial Numbers by date (factory record book)
    1903 and 1903A3 Production and Serial No table.
    1903A4 Snipers.


    B - Jan L - Feb A - Mar C - Apr K - May P - Jun
    O - Jul W - Aug D - Sep E - Oct R - Nov X - Dec




    M - 1921 N - 1922 P - 1923 R - 1924 S - 1925
    T - 1926 U - 1927 W - 1928 X - 1929 Y - 1930
    Z - 1931 A - 1932 B - 1933 C - 1934 D - 1935
    E - 1936 F - 1937 G - 1938 H - 1939 J - 1940
    K - 1941 L - 1942 MM - 1943 NN - 1944 PP - 1945
    RR - 1946 SS - 1947 TT - 1948 UU - 1949 WW - 1950
    XX - 1951 YY - 1952 ZZ - 1953 A - 1954 B - 1955
    C - 1956 D - 1957 E - 1958 F - 1959 G - 1960
    H - 1961 J - 1962 K - 1963 L - 1964 M - 1965
    N - 1966 P - 1967 R - 1968 S - 1969 T - 1970
    U - 1971 W - 1972 X - 1973 Y - 1974 Z - 1975
    I - 1976 O - 1977 Q - 1978 V - 1979 A - 1980
    B - 1981 C - 1982 D - 1983 E - 1984 F - 1985
    G - 1986 H - 1987 I - 1988 J - 1989 K - 1990
    L - 1991 M - 1992 N - 1993 O - 1994 P - 1995
    Q - 1996 R - 1997 S - 1998 T - 1999 (*) U - 2000 (*)
    V - 2001 (*) W - 2002 X - 2003 Y - 2004 Z - 2005
    A - 2006 B - 2007 C - 2008 D - 2009 E - 2010
    F - 2011 G - 2012



    Using barrel codes (such as those listed above) to date the manufacture are reliable on Remington rifles, as the company rarely changed barrels on a customer's rifle.

    Using these barrel codes to date a shotgun is somewhat unreliable, as shotgun barrels are often interchanged at random. One needs to be sure that the barrel is original to the gun before trusting the Barrel Code listing, above.

    (*) On 8/9/99, stopped stamping the barrels with the date code. They continued to mark the date code on the end flap of the shipping box. They resumed stamping the date code on the barrel on 10/1/01.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    It's NEVER TOO LATE to join
    The Remington Society of America...

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
  8. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    Other than upgraded cosmetics, there's not a lot of difference between a Model 721/722 and a Model 700. And I much prefer the safety set-up on older Remingtons as opposed to the ones made for the last 25 years or so.
     
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