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Removal of Lead Stains - What's Your Secret?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Load Master, Apr 16, 2018.

  1. Load Master

    Load Master Member

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    This is my first stainless wheel gun. I would like to remove the lead stains without damaging the finish you can see on the cylinder. Do you have something that works well for you? I would appreciate it if you would share. Thanks!!

    26606340797_802585fce6_c.jpg
     
  2. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    A white ink eraser will take the carbon rings right off...I don't clean those rings off unless I am intending to sell the gun, though. They will cause no harm.
     
  3. jr_watkins

    jr_watkins Member

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  4. DDDWho

    DDDWho Member

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    I soak cylinder in Hoppe's and scrub with a brass brush. Walmart has the brushes in the hardware section. Looks like a large toothbrush.... Cheap and it works
     
  5. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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  6. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    It's a waste of time. They reappear anyway, and do no harm.
     
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  7. Haywood

    Haywood Member

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    Outers Nitro Solvent Gun Cleaner
    Flitz Metal Polish
    Birchwood Casey Lead Remover and Polishing Cloth
    I clean my guns every time they are shot. They must remain spotless inside and out. My carry guns are just as clean. I’m just about as bad with my Vehicles. I drive my Wife nuts. She says I’m O C D.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
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  8. Load Master

    Load Master Member

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    Thanks guys for the input.
    My wife tells me the same thing, OCD. She maybe right.
     
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  9. J-Bar

    J-Bar Member

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    Beauty marks.
     
  10. PO2Hammer

    PO2Hammer Member

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    There's a big outfit out of KY or TN that specializes in selling vintage revolvers. If you look closely at their pics you can see sanding marks on the cylinder faces. Not recommending that, just something to watch for
     
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  11. rpenmanparker

    rpenmanparker Member

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    I use the brass brush also with cleaning solvent . But it is really more trouble than it is worth.
     
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  12. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    It's not lead, it's carbon scoring and it's an unbelievable waste of time to even worry about it, much less cleaning it off after shooting. You can do more harm than good and I'll never buy a used gun that it looks like the cylinder face was scrubbed clean every time it was shot.
     
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  13. Jonesy814

    Jonesy814 Member

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    I shoot my guns a lot. I dont bother with the carbon rings because if I did I would eventually have the cylinder rubbed down to nothing. Different metal polishes like Mothers or flitz will take them right off but you are also removing a microscopic ammountoif metal. Do that 10 times a year for 20 years and it will add up and make your cylinder gap bigger
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018
  14. Load Master

    Load Master Member

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    Seeing a number of folks feel you shouldn't bother to remove it, is there something that can be applied to the stainless before hand to reduce the adhesion of the residue?
     
  15. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    I'm more interested in shooting them.
     
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  16. P5 Guy

    P5 Guy Member

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    Leave them on, if you are on the wrong end it lets the perp know you can shoot.
     
  17. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Yeah.

    Shoot Black Powder. I never get carbon rings on the face of my revolver cylinders that I shoot with Black Powder cartridges. What fouling is there washes off easily with warm water.

    I always tell folks that once they have enough revolvers, they will stop worrying about the carbon rings on the face of the cylinder.

    Obviously, you don't have enough revolvers yet.

    What is happening is at the moment the bullet leaves the cartridge case, a tiny portion of the base of a lead bullet atomizes from the effect of the hot exhaust gasses. As the bullet passes the barrel/cylinder gap, the atomized lead along with carbon from the exhaust gasses gets blasted out the barrel/cylinder gap. Because the opening of the barrel/cylinder gap is so narrow, the ejecta gets blasted out at very high velocity. As it strikes the cylinder face it leaves a perfect imprint the same diameter as the barrel forcing cone. The reason this fouling is so much more difficult to remove than the ordinary fouling left behind in the chambers and bore is the fact that it was blasted onto the cylinder face at such high velocity.

    You may have heard of the Greek legend of Sisyphus, condemned to forever roll a boulder up a mountainside, only to have it roll down again the next day so he had to do it over and over for eternity.

    It is the same with cleaning carbon rings off the face of a cylinder. It is a laborious and futile exercise.

    Buy some more revolvers and stop worrying about the carbon rings.
     
  18. Jonesy814

    Jonesy814 Member

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    You could buy blued guns. You still get the rings but cant really see them so they don't bother you
     
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  19. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Yep, it won't hurt anything, and if you are too aggressive and/or use the wrong product (often) you can do damage. Clean up nice to sell? Sure. The Slip 2000 will not hurt anything and will get things cleaned up nicely. Early on I never cleaned guns very often, then for a short time I got on a run where I would clean them up real well all the time, but soon went back to just wiping them down well/oiling them up when needed, and keep shooting them.
     
  20. Curator

    Curator Member

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    Bronze wool and a drop of Automobile transmission fluid. Takes off lead, carbon, rust and won't hurt the blueing underneath. This is what we used in the museum business to clean guns without damaging the patina of age. Brass brushes will also work but beware of cheap brass-bristle brushes that are made with brass plated steel bristles. Take a magnet with you when you go to buy them.
     
  21. gk3

    gk3 Member

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    I'll second or third the Birchwood Casey lead cleaning cloth. I can use nothing but the cloth and it does the job. See attached for before and after. Takes about 5-10 minutes.
     

    Attached Files:

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  22. doubleh

    doubleh Member

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    I just wipe the cylinder down with Hoppe's #9 to get the easy to remove stuff off. It hurts nothing and will just reappear the next time the gun is shot. I take very good care of my firearms but removing residue on the front of a cylinder is kind of in the same category as flogging a dead horse in my opinion.
     
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  23. Bartojc

    Bartojc Member

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    When I got my first stainless I obsessed about getting them of. Then after about 2 weeks and a couple times shooting I lost interest. I do not obsess about getting those carbon rings off. They come back next time out so why bother ? I find the more I shoot the less I obsess about cleaning. I like to keep them clean but I no longer obsess over them every single time out.

    -Jeff
     
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  24. Master Blaster

    Master Blaster Member

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    A brass gun brush like those made by Hoppes will do the job, along with a little CLP.
     
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  25. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    I, too used to clean them off... but it’s a waste of time because they come right back on the first shot through each chamber.

    Now the cylinder face will get a Flitz treatment if I’m selling it. Otherwise, it’s a hoppes wipedown, re-oil and away we go.
     
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