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removing light rust

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by old fart, Apr 22, 2014.

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  1. old fart

    old fart Member

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    on my service six i have light specks of rust on the gun, i can't afford a hot blue and i don't do cold blue well and wouldn't want to cold blue as it don't last for me. the blueing is good on the gun, just the specks of rust are on it but they are stuborn. they aren't all over it in patches just tiny pin head size specks on the frame and cylinder here and there. i have fritz metal polish and wonder about it. now i have one more question, if i keep it cleaned and oiled will it get worse? it will be my woods gun so as long as it wouldn't get worse i'm fine with it. but if it would i want to stop it if i can. thanks for any help
     
  2. back40

    back40 Member

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    use some CLP or your favorite gun oil and some 'fine' bronze wool. 0000 steel wool works too, but the bronze is softer and splinters less, leaving behind less debris (also the bronze debris won't rust). just scrub gently with plenty of oil to clean it up.
     
  3. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    Use oil and 000 steel wool to gently remove rust. Keeping it oiled will hold further rust at bay.
     
  4. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    That would be 0000 ( Super Fine) Steel wool & oil.

    Not 000 (Extra Fine).
    000 will leave tracks!

    Rc
     
  5. rswartsell

    rswartsell Member

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    ^+1,

    Ask a man that knows by experience. 4 zeros. I like Kroil with it, but even liquid wrench (pretty bad choice) should do OK if you pay attention to 4 zeros.

    P.S. And a light touch, this ain't no time to go Cro-Magnon on this.
     
  6. herkyguy

    herkyguy Member

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    I've had rust on an SP101 and my GP100. The GP100 was tough because it had crept in around the grip.

    I scrubbed off the rust with CLP and have since kept a close eye on those spots and always well oiled.

    I was bummed at first, but now those spots where the bluing is gone give it some character. Still love both those guns.
     
  7. spanky1968

    spanky1968 Member

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    Same as the rest: 0000 a light application of gun oil and a soft touch and you should be fine. Keep it oiled and you are good to go.
     
  8. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    Been dere, done dat. 4'0 steel wool and light oil. Not a big deal on the oil. Kroil, LW, gun oil, motor oil or even WD-40 all work.

    But there's really no need to avoid using moderate force. A light touch to many means something that wouldn't scuff a maiden's cheek fair cheek. Instead you're after a firm pressure to cut away the rust mechanically. The sort of firm pressure you'd typically use for wiping down the kitchen counter. The oil is there to lubricate the wool sliding on the barrel and flow away the rust and fill in the rust to make it look black like the rest of the area.

    And as long as you're using bronze or steel wool you won't scuff the blueing. The blueing is harder than the edges of these two metals. What you NEED to avoid is replacing the bronze or steel wool with other pads such as Scotch-brite and the like. Those will scratch and scuff the metal badly. Which is fine on your kitchen pots but not so fine on your blued guns.
     
  9. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    Not much I can add to the above except good bluing can handle moderate or tougher scrubbing with 0000 and oil so don't baby it(but don't get ham fisted with it either). I use and prefer WD-40 as the oil and use it to flush after the rust has been completely removed(it will flush off the remnants of the steel wool. I then remove the excess oil with compressed air and wipe with a soft cloth(I prefer flannel for this).
     
  10. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    As said above, 0000 steel wool and a gun oil will remove most surface rust easily. I completely agree a light touch is needed. You will feel a little "grit" when rubbing over the rust and then you will feel it go smooth. That is when you stop. Apply a good gun oil or rust prevention and call it good...
     
  11. old fart

    old fart Member

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    ok, i have used 0000 wool and rem oil is what i had, with a little flitz too. there still looks like frecks on the gun but when i run my finger over them its smooth. to explain the best i can is, if i took the cylinder or top strap in my hand now and closed my eyes i can't feel the rust or where it is or was, with a light i can see the small frecks there but they are smooth. do i need to do more? also i have been told a pencil eraser will work, will it? have i got it done or do i continue?with it smooth now i really don't know. it wasn't bad to begin with as it was barely felt but i call it freckling. thanks
     
  12. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    No!

    If you can't feel it the rust is stopped and is no longer doing damage.

    The 'Frecks'? are where the rust already removed the bluing and there is nothing you can do about it short of a full refinish.

    Rubbing on them further with a pencil eraser will only make them show up worse.

    rc
     
  13. old fart

    old fart Member

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    thanks i don't plan on refinishing it as it wasn't terribly bad and its gonna be my woods gun. just want to stop the rust now and keep it cleaned so it don't come back.
     
  14. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    While most cold bluing is not worth the bottle it's stored in there is one very good cold bluing available that works extremely well, especially for touch-ups.

    Brownells Oxpho-Blue is a good product. All you need to do is remove all the oil, dab on the Oxpho-Blue with a Q-tip and when the color matches wipe it off with a soft cloth. If you're happy with the color oil the gun and you're done. If not retreat the spots. Really, it's very easy and it's probably the best cold bluing product on the market. (no fuss, no muss and no terrible smell)
    http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...ld-bluing-chemicals/oxpho-blue--prod1072.aspx
     
  15. Field Tester

    Field Tester Member

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    Thank you for this. I'm going to keep this product in mind when I clean up my Dad's .38.
     
  16. boom boom

    boom boom Member

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    Try Blue Wonder cleaner which Brownells, Midway, etc handle. Oil combined with a mild cleanser in a gel--however you do need to clean and oil afterwards. It handles some pretty tough rust without harming the blueing underneath (of course it will not fix rust pitting) on old milsurps and also gets rid of old hardened cosmoline/dirt/oily gunk with aplomb. Use it with 0000 steel wool or nylon type brushes for small crevices as mentioned above and don't try gorilla type scrubbing. Follow the directions then cleanup/oil as the solution is mildly alkaline-I have used Kroil or CLP to equal effect afterwards.

    Another plus 1 for Oxpho-Blue-just follow the directions and it does a good job for touchups and is relatively durable. Use the thicker version for things like rifle barrels and the thinner mix for small parts or places where it won't run off.
     
  17. old fart

    old fart Member

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    i have had several messages wanting to see exactly what i mean by freckling, i couldn't get a good enough pic on my own gun but found a pic online that is just about exactly like mine. except for the trigger and hammer, in the pic this gun has a rusty trigger and hammer mine is nice and clean and shiny. but on the cylinder and frame are what mine looks like, just spots here and there, now after cleaning, the spots are smooth and can't be felt. here is the pic, thanks
    gunnnnnn_zps37e61c67.gif
     
  18. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    That's an excellent description and supplies the last bit needed to finish off the instructions.

    Old fart, it is what it is now. There's no treatment or cold blue that will remove the last of the freckles you are feeling. The next step would be a full on removal of the existing bluing, a polishing job to remove the last remnants of the freckles and then a full re-blue.

    Chances are though that at present the freckles are all but unnoticeable except under bright light and with good eyes.
     
  19. old fart

    old fart Member

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    thats true, if i just hold it up and look i can barely see any spots, but if i shine a light on it they can be seen better.
     
  20. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    The Oxpho-Blue treatment I suggested above is more for protecting the now bare metal than cosmetic reasons. It's the only cold bluing I know of that will do a decent job.
     
  21. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    So don't bring along the movie set lights when you go to the range.... :D
     
  22. old fart

    old fart Member

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    i wanted to thank everyone for their help, i got all the little specks down smooth. i went in my back yard today and fired a few rds of 158 grain sp and 125 grain sp, the 125 were about 1 inch lower at 10 yds. this gun is really something, its a fixed sight but it hits dead on. i put either the 158 or the 125 in less than 2 inches at 10yds off handed using 2 hand grip. the remington 125 soft point are accurate and i'm glad my friend let me get them at a good price. i still prefer the federal 158 soft point tho. thanks again
     
  23. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    The old revolvers are good revolvers and every time I see a thread like this one it shows it's still true. I'm glad you got everything worked out on that revolver...
     
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