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Removing the pitting on a Winchester .22

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by loose noose, Nov 28, 2012.

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  1. loose noose

    loose noose Member

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    I've been doing a complete restoration on a model 62 slide action .22 rim fire rifle. When I got it it was a complete hunk of rust and abuse, I've got the stock complete and it looks really good, however allthough the steel is mostly done (polished) the barrel and receiver still have some imperfections in it, is there any way to quickly remove these blemishes, pics wouldn't help cause it looks really good. Please don't tell me to keep polishing it.:scrutiny::confused:
     
  2. Kp321

    Kp321 Member

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    Keep polishing! Seriously, the only way to remove pits is to take the metal down far enough to clear them. A few small deep pits could conceivably be welded and polished but widespread pitting is hard to deal with. All of the rust must be removed before reblueing, otherwise the new finish will be freckled. This can be done with rust remover or grit blasting. My preferred method is a blast with fine media before polishing. You can still see the pits after the gun is blued but it looks better. Don't try for a mirror polish, the pits don't show so bad with a more satin polish.
     
  3. loose noose

    loose noose Member

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    Thank ya Kp321, reckon I'll try that method, I don't believe the feller that owned it is too concerned about the finish any way, allthough I myself like the mirror s type of finish.:)
     
  4. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    The traditional way would be to draw file it down past the surface imperfections, then polish it.

    rc
     
  5. Flyincedar

    Flyincedar Member

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    Depending how bad they are, there are some Scotch wheels for buffers that will work. Mine is a fairly fine wheel and will remove light pitting. Maybe a slightly more coarse wheel would work if the pitting is deeper
     
  6. hq

    hq Member

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    Be careful with power tools. Flat surfaces can be hand-sanded by placing a large piece of fine sandpaper on a glass plate and sanding the parts on it, in a figure 8 pattern. Not exactly quick but the results are worth it. Preserving roll markings is difficult, though.
     
  7. loose noose

    loose noose Member

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    Thanks guys, I've allready draw filed the receiver, and I've got that polished out and ready for the bluing process, the major problem is the barrel, toward the muzzle it is paper thin. Reckon I'll just go ahead and finish polishing it and let the chips fall where they may. The scotch guard wheels seem to work really well, but I'm afraid the muzzle end of the barrel is going to show some pitting. :(:uhoh:
     
  8. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    I have a gun in a satin semi-gloss rust blue. There are some imperfections showing through if you look closely, but getting them out would have thinned some of the roll marks more than I was willing to give up.
     
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