Request Finish "Repair" Suggestions

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by 1SOW, Nov 18, 2011.

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  1. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

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    CZ Pistol, Black, with a few small wear marks to metal and a couple of small "oops" chips in the finish.

    What I want is a black durable "protection from corrosion" not a like-new finish. I'm not going to smooth/level it.

    I've tried paint and markers, but they are removed by gun and brake cleaners after a short while.

    Thanks in advance for anyone who has an experienced suggestion. That could include "can't be done", but I hope not.
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I have no idea what the CZ finish is, but it looks suspiciously like powder coat.

    I don't know of any solvent base touch-up paint that will stand the solvents used in gun cleaning like powder coat.
    Or build up to that much thickness.

    Maybe some sort of two-part epoxy finish, maybe.

    rc
     
  3. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

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    Thanks RC. CZ calls the finish "Polycoat". It's a blend that includes ceramics and heated to bond with the steel. It is very durable. But 'enough' mileage, holster use and clumsy DIY'ers can mar it.

    I'm not going to try "levelling" the dings once they get protected by something black and durable. I just want a protection that won't "wash" off..

    EG. I would be totally satisfied with black laundry marker IF it wouldn't wash off. This is my fun-gun and it's used as a "tool" I want to keep serviceable. To me, it's real beauty is in how it shoots, not how it looks in the box. It's over 50K rds.

    A tough solvent-proof matte/flat or satin black is what I'm really after. I should/will look into your epoxy suggestion.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2011
  4. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Polycoat sure sounds like Powdercoat to me.

    The most common polymers used in powder coating are are polyester, polyurethane, polyester-epoxy (known as hybrid), straight epoxy (fusion bonded epoxy) and acrylics.

    rc
     
  5. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

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    You're correct. The total contents of the "powder" is not defined.
    Polycoat: Black polymer is electrostaticly applied powder coating that is then oven cured to a hard shell. The coating is applied over a Parkerized or Phosphate finish which is very corrosion resistant in itself, the parts are then racked and given a negative charge and sprayed at the guns components. This charged attraction literally draws the coating to the parts, this gives the parts a uniform finish and reduces overspray. The parts are cured in a oven and this produces a tough Mil. spec. finish.

    Now, what will stick to it and be chemical resistant?
     
  6. aminyard

    aminyard Member

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    I would try Brownell's Gun Kote. It is a bake on finish that is pretty tuff. You can get it in a spray can, but it is best applied with an airbrush. It is available in a number of black and blue/black colors.

    Good Luck
     
  7. CCR

    CCR Member

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    If you are going to do it it yourself I would suggest using something like Gunkote you can buy from Brownells.

    The key to refinishing is the prep work. If you want rust and corrosion protection I would also suggest parkerizing it first.

    If I can help or answer any questions feel free to ask
     
  8. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

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    Thanks guys, I'll probably give Gun Kote a try even though less than a "thimble-full" is all I need.
     
  9. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    You will find that Dupli-Color auto body touchup paint in matte black is an almost perfect match. (Most auto paint in matte black is a good match.)

    Get a small spray can of the touch-up paint ($6-$7), spray some onto a sheet of aluminum foil or a aluminum pie plate, and use a fine brush to apply to the scratches or chips. (The spray paint is thinner than the small jars of touch up paint and will apply more easily without ugly raised areas.)

    I've done it a couple of times and it's almost impossible to see the repair if you take your time and do it right. Let it dry thorough and treat it as you would a car paint repair -- maybe even lightly wet sanding the problem area when you're done...

    If you aren't able to get the look you want, you'll only be out about $10 or so.

    Note: The polycoat finish is bonded to the parkerized base steel. (I don't know if the alloy frames are parkerized or not.) Removing the polycoat and getting the surface ready for any other finish is no easy task.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2011
  10. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

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    Walt.
    I've tried BBQ hi-temp paint and one other that "washed off" when hit by solvent, but I'll give the Dupli-Color a shot (pun).
    Even if it washes/wears of, it'll be "available" and easy to re-do.
    I sprayed into the paint can lid and used an artist's brush.
    Good idea. Thanks
     
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