Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Revolving Rifles

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by GunsBeerFreedom, Feb 24, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. GunsBeerFreedom

    GunsBeerFreedom Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Messages:
    335
    I've been toying with the idea of a revolving rifle. I've seen several available, but only in pistol calibers. I want a rifle caliber. But my biggest concern is, is such a thing even possible? Could a revolver cylinder hand the pressures that modern rifle rounds deliver? I know there are 45-70 revolvers, so I wouldn't think a revolving rifle in that caliber would be too far fetched. But most loads I've seen in reloading manuals don't go past 35K.

    So in short is it possible to make a revolver cylinder that can handle say, 308 pressures?
     
  2. Balrog

    Balrog Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    1,980
    You know with a revolving rifle, you have to put your left arm on the forearm of the stock, which means it will be exposed to the cylinder gap and hot escaping gases. Does that sound like a good idea?
     
  3. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    4,910
    You know with a revolving rifle, you have to put your left arm on the forearm of the stock, which means it will be exposed to the cylinder gap and hot escaping gases. Does that sound like a good idea?

    Rifle pressures would make the blast worse. It's even a worst idea with a cap and ball revolving rifle. If you get a chain fire you're supporting hand gets hit by up to 5 balls. That would be a surgeon's nightmare trying to put it back together.
     
  4. GunsBeerFreedom

    GunsBeerFreedom Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Messages:
    335
    I've never heard of such problems with the MTs-255, but granted, I've heard little at all about them.
     
  5. Balrog

    Balrog Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    1,980
    Actually it would be simple. Just snip off any bits left attached, and apply a dressing. Hand goes in the bucket.

    If I am not mistaken, that shotgun has a metal shield that covers the cylinder gap.
     
  6. Vicious-Peanut

    Vicious-Peanut Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2007
    Messages:
    670
    Location:
    Texas
    This is the first thing that popped into my head, but you must remember, shotguns operate at ~12K psi, a lot less than the ~60K a .308 operates at. Plus, I think they might have a shield, but its hard to tell.
     
  7. Balrog

    Balrog Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    1,980
    I am pretty sure they have a shield.
     
  8. Nick5182

    Nick5182 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2009
    Messages:
    583
    Location:
    Iowa
  9. GunsBeerFreedom

    GunsBeerFreedom Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Messages:
    335
    Hence my question. And they do have a shield.
     
  10. VA27

    VA27 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,854
    Location:
    Slovenly Manor, Dungheap-Upon-The-Hill
    With the right steel the pressures wouldn't be a problem. Base the design on the Nagant revolver and the cylinder blast problem is solved.

    Draw yer money gun and start shootin' out hunnerd dollar bills 'til yer gunsmith says "Whoa!"
    (Make sure you've practiced your speedload!)
     
  11. Col. Plink

    Col. Plink Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2009
    Messages:
    1,750
    I don't mind tellin' you that Circuit Judge is one sexy gun! I don't go out for looks much with firearms but that's a fetching piece right there.
     
  12. Nicodemus38

    Nicodemus38 Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2009
    Messages:
    583
    the true issue is mechanical in nature, not a function of structural strength.

    the mechanical issue is that when the cartridge goes up in size and pressure, the cylinder must go up in size and weight. there then appears a mechanical issue between cylinder, hand, and cylinder bolt. slow operation would be ok for a reasonable round count. however as some people have discovered with SOME models of taurus judge is that the longer and heavier cylinders have to much mass to be stopped in time for proper alignment with barrel and firing pin at moment of ignition. that makes issues appear.
     
  13. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2007
    Messages:
    5,020
    Location:
    Northern Orygun
    You well only place your hand in front of the cylinder one time.

    If your shooting a true revolving rifle with a rifle length barrel you pretty much have to hold forward of the cylinder, back in the day heavy gloves with long gauntlets were used.

    If shooting a carbine or pistol length barrel a two hand hold at the grips works very well. These are a blast to shoot.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Lovesbeer99

    Lovesbeer99 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    Messages:
    1,413
  15. BsChoy

    BsChoy Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,344
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Taurus is actually making a judge rifle this year....A revolving rifle!
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page