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Rifle Grouping

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by JimKirk, Sep 29, 2009.

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  1. JimKirk

    JimKirk Member

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    I'd like to give credit to who it belongs, but I don't remember who or where I read this. About thirty-five plus years ago I read about how one of the big time magazine writers tested the grouping of his rifles. This was his method as best as I remember: Go to the bench and sight rifle in. Go out the next day and shoot one shot. Go out the next day and shoot one shot. Continue until you shoot the number of shots that you normally shoot for groups. Five days one shot per day for five shot group, ten days for ten shot group. Now this was for a HUNTING RIFLE. He shot about the same time each day. I adopted his method with some modifications. I shoot two shots per day at different times of the day for five days for a ten shot group. I do the different time because I shoot deer at different times of the day. Before you pour the gas on and lite the flames, let me explain. His explaination first, by shooting the once/day, this would give you the "most likely group" that you could expect form your rifle and bullets combo. I may not be as a good a shot as those magazine writers so I added the second shot per day, that allowed me a backup shot. I also moved my times around because I shoot deer morning, evening and sometimes midday too. By shooting the ten shots I get a "most likely" ten shot group. This method does away with the waiting for the barrel to cool and adds in the different temperatures of the day. And if I miss, I can't blame the rifle! Any Thoughts?
    Jimmy K

    Jimmy K
     
  2. PT1911

    PT1911 Member

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    I can understand the concept behind this... could be time consuming of course... but not a bad idea at all...
     
  3. JimKirk

    JimKirk Member

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    I used to shoot just evenings when I got off work, I'm lucky I have my range jsu 50 yrds from my house. I know it would not work for everybody. Now that I retired I can shoot most any time.

    Jimmy K
     
  4. flashhole

    flashhole Member

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    Do you always shoot at the same target with the same bench set up?
     
  5. JimKirk

    JimKirk Member

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    Yes I do and yes I know it does not equal the same type shots as I would hunting. However I try to have some type rest whenever I shoot at any deer or hog, such as a tree or forked limb, which has worked well for me. I do feel this type shooting gives a better(maybe a truer) group then going and shooting 10 shots all at once. Or you can do like a lot of folks .... shoot 30 or forty rounds and circle the closet five and say that my rifle will shoot 1/2" all day long. Give it a try and see what you and your rifle will do!

    Jimmy K
     
  6. 243winxb

    243winxb Member

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    Rifle Holding Zero.

    Shooting over a long period of days is a test to see if your rifle holds 0.This is why we sight in our hunting rifle every year. Wood stocks that are not free floated and glass bedded can, and do change 0 over time. Wood takes on moisture moving the non-floated barrel. Lots of rifles have the pressure point riding on the front of the barrel, about 8 lbs of up pressure. Soon or later the wood stock bends to the constant pressure, and the 0 mover lower. Not a problem today if using plastic stocks, newer bedding methods, with free floating barrels. Even a gun like a Marlin model 39 22 LR can change 0 because how the forearm is installed. The first shot out of a clean barrel is very different. Most shoot a little high.
     
  7. dagger dog

    dagger dog Member

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    One from a cold rifle barrel is in essence what happens when you hunt, so the type of testing JimKirk does seems valid, if you want a true picture of what your capabilities are with a cold barrel. The only drawback is it should be done from a hunting stance,using a sling,tree branch to steady your shot or if you're the Crockett type, freehand.
     
  8. flashhole

    flashhole Member

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    I was hoping you would post a picture of your target. I put a lot of creedence in the first shot out of a cold clean barrel and pay close attention to where it hits the target. A clean barrel to me is one I've run a Bore Snake through after I've fired it a few times. During hunting season I don't oil the inside of my barrel, I just make sure it is free of powder residue after I've fired it.
     
  9. JDGray

    JDGray Member

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    Your cold bore shot shouldn't be to far away from the rest of the shots, if you were to shoot more than 1 shot at a session. For hunting purposes, your cold bore is the money shot, but the other shots , if taken, would be within an inch or so, and also a kill.;)
     
  10. JimKirk

    JimKirk Member

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    Sorry no photos from past. I will start this years firing next week, then I post some photos. Glad to see that some of you all get the reason behind this method. Like I said it is from a steady bench rest so I give up that when hunting, but If I miss I can't blame the rifle! Cold bore first shot is what counts when deer hunting.

    Jimmy K
     
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