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Rifle Identity

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by maineac, Oct 15, 2008.

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  1. maineac

    maineac Member

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    I have this rifle I inhereted and want to ID it as to make and caliber.I think it is possibily Swiss Military but not sure.Looks to be very shootable still,if ammo is available would like to try.I'll try to put in some pics and possibly links to more.
    Gun has what looks to be military serial number stamped on stock and barrel(0 9752).Also has emblem stamped on stock,oval shape,inside edges have(RIPARZE on left,TORINO on bottom and left I can't make out.In center of oval looks like (U) with possible a crown on top ,looks almost like acorn.Gun is 53 1-2" long with 34" barrel.Bore measures approx. 7/16" dia. at end of barrel.
    Bottom of stock at fore end has groove in itr that maybe held a cleaning rod.Has mount for dagger on barrel.Not fancy but some type of checkering lines at grip.
    Thank you for any help.




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  2. nambu1

    nambu1 Member

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  3. Vaarok

    Vaarok Member

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    Fairly valuable, say about $400-500. Fires a big old blackpowder cartridge.

    The Italians went from muzzleloaders to breechloaders in 1870, and in 1887 finally realized that single-shot rifles sucked compared to a magazine rifle, and upgraded all their guns accordingly.

    Most of these rifles got upgraded in 1915 and 1916 into a emergency last-ditch only-for-cooks-and-medics version that could theoretically fire smokeless 6.5x52mm Carcano ammo... Once or twice. In an emergency.

    Obviously, as a result, the 70/87/16s are commonly encountered in great shape. The unconverted 70/87s are consequently rare.

    http://personal.stevens.edu/~gliberat/carcano/history.html
     
  4. maineac

    maineac Member

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    Thankyou,pictures look identical.Now to see if ammo available and not too expensive.
     
  5. maineac

    maineac Member

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    I also have a 1938 carcano in 6.5mm,maybe ill wall hang them togather.
     
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