Quantcast

Rolex and Handgun Shooting

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by Paul7, May 29, 2020.

  1. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    27,024
    My grammar school graduation watch lasted through high school and a couple years of college.
    When it quit, my Dad loaned me his Girard Perregaux which I managed to get stolen.
    Mom said she would get me a new watch for Christmas 1968, what did I want?
    Rolex GMT Master, of course.
    But she couldn't afford that, a whopping $150, so I settled for an Omega Seamaster at only $85.
     
    bannockburn and Speedo66 like this.
  2. Dframe

    Dframe Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Messages:
    1,216
    Location:
    Central Illinois
    Rolexes are built like tanks. I've shot with mine for over 20 years.
     
  3. danez71

    danez71 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Messages:
    4,692
    Location:
    CAAZ;TX?
    I would venture to guess a watch sees more G force shock from being whacked against something in daily use than from gun recoil.

    Its only barely snug and a lot soft fleshy stuff between it and the gun.



    I came to realize that there are clocks everywhere or I'll see one in very short amount of time.

    And where/when that isn't the case, good chance that it's not that important.
     
    Demi-human likes this.
  4. Paul7

    Paul7 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,308
    Location:
    New Mexico
    That was a lot of money back then, and at the time Omega was certainly considered the equal of Rolex. Still a great watch.
     
  5. Paul7

    Paul7 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,308
    Location:
    New Mexico
    No apology needed, this is a gun forum, not a watch forum.
     
    chicharrones likes this.
  6. Paul7

    Paul7 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,308
    Location:
    New Mexico
    That makes sense, especially if the watch is worn on the off hand.
     
  7. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Messages:
    6,357
    Location:
    Flatlandistan
    That's not much settling, the Seamasters are beautiful watches. Omega's have a great history, people on watch forums are all excited about the new space launch because Omega was one of the watches the early astronauts wore.

    One snuck his personal watch on board, and that watch is now a collectible. The Pogue model Seiko.
     
  8. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Messages:
    6,357
    Location:
    Flatlandistan
    Watch collectors are like gun collectors, they want originality and patina. If you notice on that watch the painted lumination on the dial has turned from white to a mocha color, collectors love that. Same for original hands, even if they've lost the lumination.

    Funny thing is, Rolex is not considered a very expensive brand among serious collectors. There are Swiss brands out there most of us haven't heard of, extremely expensive, that go for 3-5 times and more than the price of Rolex.

    The public knows of Rolex because they advertise a lot, sponsor racees and yachting events, and hey, James Bond wore one.
     
  9. Paul7

    Paul7 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,308
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Similar to a Colt SAA 1st gen. with patina.
     
    Speedo66 likes this.
  10. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    6,320
    The only time I ever heard of shooting a gun damaging a watch was when a cop was in a gunfight and the other guy managed to hit the cops watch.

    This is not all that unusual, often people involved in gun battles have bullets hit their gun and hands.
    It's instinctive to focus on the threat, and the gun IS the threat. The threat is where the bullet goes.

    One way to make a good watch last is to have the case and crown gaskets replaced every few years, and don't expose the watch to hot water, as in taking a bath or shower with it on.
    The heat causes the neoprene gaskets to deteriorate and leak.

    The amount of force needed to damage a modern mechanical watch is more then the amount needed to damage YOU.
     
    Obturation and bannockburn like this.
  11. Old Dog

    Old Dog Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2004
    Messages:
    6,757
    Location:
    Back on Puget Sound
    Not to further skid off the tracks, but Bond wore an Omega mostly, at least in the movies ...
     
  12. Mike OTDP

    Mike OTDP Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    1,994
    Location:
    Somewhere in Maryland
    Yes, but in the books Bond wore a Rolex Oyster Perpetual.

    Me? I switch around. IWC Fliegerchronograph or a Bremont ALT-1Z.
     
  13. Paul7

    Paul7 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,308
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Not only in the books but in many of the Bond movies. See https://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/article/james-bond-rolex-submariner-explorer

    In one of the Bond movies the budget was very tight, and Rolex at that time didn't want to give away a watch for promotional purposes, so one of the stage crew handed Connery his own Submariner right before filming started.
     
  14. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Messages:
    6,357
    Location:
    Flatlandistan
    In one of the books, at least, he removes his Rolex Submariner and uses it as a form of brass knuckles.

    I'm not going to say Bond was the reason I bought a Submariner, or my PPK/S, but I couldn't say it didn't somewhat influence me, either. lol
     
    bannockburn and kidneyboy like this.
  15. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Messages:
    6,357
    Location:
    Flatlandistan
    Sounds like part of a very nice collection! Do you fly?
     
  16. .308 Norma

    .308 Norma Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2016
    Messages:
    2,392
    Location:
    SE Idaho
    Something Old, Something New (kinda new anyway)
    Something Old, Something New.jpg

    Without going into too much detail, this Tudor Oyster (case by Rolex) watch has been in the water in 2 oceans and 3 seas, and it was on my wrist as I ran many thousands of rounds through a few M-60s. Later on, it was on my wrist as I ran thousands of rounds through various big game rifles, and tens of thousands of rounds through dozens of different large bore handguns. It still works.
    In fairness though, I haven’t worn it much in the last 40 years or so, and hardly at all during my 30+ working years. The electromagnetic fields surrounding the high-amperage bus bars I often worked around would ruin any watch in short order.
    One other thing that could have ruined my Tudor Oyster watch in 1971 (about a year after I got it) was shorting its band across the ammeter terminals in my classic ’55 T-Bird. I was installing an 8-track (remember those?) in my T-Bird, and I was reaching up underneath the dash when I managed to short-out the car’s ammeter terminals with my watchband. Which in turn, spot-welded the band’s clasp shut, and it got real HOT, real FAST! Amongst a shower of sparks, I yanked my arm out of there of course, but I couldn’t get the band’s clasp undone because of the spot-weld. So I grabbed the band with my other hand and tried to break it. It blistered all 4 fingers on that hand. While yelling and dancing around, I managed to pull my shirt off and run it down my arm to tuck under my watchband until it cooled.
    Anyway, I had 2nd and 3rd degree burns all the way around my left wrist (which left me with a wrist-watch like scar for many years) and 2nd degree burns on my fingers on my right hand. However, the watch itself was okay, and except for a few arc-weld spots, the band was okay too once I broke the welds loose. The band finally gave out a few years back though, and I need to replace it.
    I can’t. Genuine Rolex bands are terrible expensive (a lot more than I paid for the whole danged watch in 1970) and there’s just too many sentimental things about those arc-weld spots on that old watchband. I was still wearing a bandage around my left wrist when I asked my wife to marry me in May of 1971, and even if I have to tape the band together, I’ll be wearing my Tudor Oyster watch when we celebrate our 50th wedding anniversary next June.:)
     
  17. readyeddy

    readyeddy Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Messages:
    1,595
    Impacts and shocks should be avoided with mechanical watches. It includes activities like golf, tennis and shooting recoiling guns.

    Next time you take your mechanical watch in for service ask them about high impact activities and the risks. I would tell you if I could, I just know my watch guy told me to avoid impact activities when wearing my watch.
     
    drband likes this.
  18. Plastikosmd

    Plastikosmd Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2011
    Messages:
    782
    Never had an issue after years of shooting w Rolex

    they do require periodic cleaning and maintenance
     
  19. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Messages:
    6,357
    Location:
    Flatlandistan
    Have you considered the Rolex Miligauss? Very attractive watch capable of working in a 1000 gauss field.

    https://www.rolex.com/watches/milga...=AL!141!3!407381912371!b!!g!!+rolex +milgauss

    Happy Anniversary!
     
    .308 Norma likes this.
  20. Paul7

    Paul7 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,308
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Do you know of this actually happening? Because that was my OP question and those who responded said they've shot many thousands of hi-power handgun rounds while wearing a mechanical watch with no problems. I think your watch guy is wrong, Jack Nicklaus wore a Rolex for 50 years during his playing career:

    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/12/10/jack-nicklaus-gold-rolex-watch-sells-for-1-million-at-auction.html

    Roger Federer wears a Rolex while playing tennis:

    https://hk.asiatatler.com/style/5-rolex-watches-worn-by-roger-federer
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2020
    .308 Norma likes this.
  21. Robbins290

    Robbins290 Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Messages:
    2,070
    Location:
    Limerick, maine
    As others said, i shoot with a citizen watch. With high volume shooting, i never had a issue.

    The rolex?? i can not answer that. i do not own one.
     
    .308 Norma likes this.
  22. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    3,099
    full.jpg

    I'm not actually a "watch guy" and would never have bought this for myself, but it was gifted to me 20 years ago and, like the commercials say, I have worn it mountain climbing, scuba diving, etc.

    I often remove it and slip it into a pocket while shooting, but just as often forget to, so it has withstood quite a few rounds, including things like the .500 S&W. Still works, and I never have had it serviced.

    <edit> And it is just now that I realized it must have been telling me the wrong date for the entire month of May, at least. The days do all run together during quarantine.:cool::D
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2020
    .308 Norma likes this.
  23. kidneyboy

    kidneyboy Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2018
    Messages:
    840
    Location:
    SE WI
    I have 2 Timex watches. One has survived 1000s of rounds of shooting, 2 motorcycle crashes at Road America, maybe 500 or so zero to 150MPH runs at the dragstrip, a couple of years hanging off the handlebars of various bicycles etc, etc. Still works. The other is my good watch.
     
    Ernie Bass and .308 Norma like this.
  24. .308 Norma

    .308 Norma Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2016
    Messages:
    2,392
    Location:
    SE Idaho
    Thanks!
    Yeah, I don't know how strong the electromagnet field was around those bus bars where I used to work. The bars were carrying 3-phase current to 4, large electric furnaces for melting phosphate ore. The furnaces drew somewhere around 200 mega-amps per phase, and when I walked under the bus bars (7 or 8 feet above my head) I could feel the metal buttons on my overalls vibrate. Anyone wearing a watch could watch it go so fast that the minute hand was moving almost as fast as the second hand usually moved, and the second hand would be going around every few seconds.
    It doesn't matter now. I've been retired since 2005, have lots of time for shooting and goofing around on the internet, and the elemental phosphorus plant where I used to work isn't even there anymore.
    I wear a "Cabela's" (I don't know what brand it is) watch nowadays, and because I'm not very careful with it while working around the place here, I've had to replace its leather band 2 or 3 times in the last 5 years or so. However, shooting hard kicking handguns doesn't seem to bother the watch. But then again, I don't see why it should - I'm right handed, and wear my watch on my left wrist of course. A cylinder full of "Ruger Only" 45 Colt loads in my Blackhawk will have my 72 year-old tendonitis right elbow scolding me for a week, but it doesn't bother my wrist-watch arm one bit.;)
     
    Obturation likes this.
  25. readyeddy

    readyeddy Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Messages:
    1,595
    Mechanical watches have shock absorbers but impacts should be avoided if possible. Here's an article that helps explain mechanical watch maintenance. https://gearpatrol.com/2018/11/20/mechanical-watch-maintenance-guide/

    FWIW I wear my mechanical watch while shooting and sometimes it takes impacts from daily wear. I treat my watch like I treat my truck. Both are not delicate and can take use and some hard use, but they are machines with moving parts and their repair can be costly.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice