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Ruger Distaste

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Blue Brick, Nov 2, 2012.

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  1. huntsman

    huntsman Member

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    nope just the sorry state of manufacturing and I learned my lesson and don’t sell anymore.
     
  2. Pointshoot

    Pointshoot Member

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    "Ruger Distaste" - - -not from these quarters.

    I have Redhawks in 45 Colt and 44 Mag. Various Blackhawks including a Bisley and a Flat top 44 Special. And, one of my first revolvers was (like a lot of guys) a Single Six. Theyre all excellent revolvers.

    Nowadays new Smith wheelgun prices are pretty high. (I prefer the older guns). The only gun that I would consider half reasonably priced are the J frames. I have several S&W wheel guns - - - -I'm glad I bought them years ago. New versions are too much money IMO.
     
  3. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

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    Mine taste like steel.
    Except for the SR9. It tastes like steel and tupperware.
     
  4. 76shuvlinoff

    76shuvlinoff Member

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    The wife's bedside comforter is a 4(.2) stainless sp101. It fits her and with a bit of trigger work she runs it well. Can't argue with that. IMHO out of the box Rugers have crappy triggers that were built to go bang EVERY time.

    As mentioned above if you wanna see "hate" talk Taurus. Yeah, I have one of those too. I have not found anything to hate yet.
     
  5. harmon rabb

    harmon rabb Member

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    Distaste? There's pretty much no quality difference between ruger and Smith these days, there is less than zero durability and longevity difference, yet there is still a price difference.

    So, no. Only distaste in my mouth is what Smith has left. My gp100, sp101, and lcr are not only better guns than their Smith counterparts, but also cheaper.
     
  6. harmon rabb

    harmon rabb Member

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    My wife likes the sp101 and has claimed it too. Can't complain. Not the 1911 or xd I leave out for me, but also not worried about her when I'm gone. A man may have to answer for the intruder he shoots. A woman alone with her 2 kids, in Texas? Find me a jury who will convict that. She knows to shoot first, ask questions later. Wouldn't want to be hit with what she has in that sp101
     
  7. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Member

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    The folks still complaining about Bill Ruger Sr.'s comments on magazine capacity need to give it up already.

    Bill Ruger Sr. is no longer running Ruger.
    Bill Ruger Sr. is no longer alive.

    Bill Ruger Jr. is no longer running Ruger.
    There is no Ruger family member running Ruger.

    What Bill Ruger Sr. said about the AWB is about as relevant to the current Ruger company and products as Henry Ford's anti-semitism is to the current Ford company and their automobiles.
     
  8. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    John, nicely put. :)
     
  9. fastest45ever

    fastest45ever Member

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    Some of the guns have weird specs. .45 Colt, Single Six, and, they don't go out of their way to let you know what they are. 226" throats on a .22lr cylinder?

    How are the .45 Colt specs, CraigC?

    Weird part is even calling Ruger can get you contrary information, depending on who you talk to.

    It also appears they are finally targeting some pretty big markets. The Single Ten appears to have tighter 22lr specs, and a tighter barrel, but that depends on who you talk to.

    In essence Rugers SA's in oarticular, are expensive for what they are. I don't want to dump another 500 dollars into a gun to get a barrel that is tight enough for .22lr, with a decent cylinder.
     
  10. hq

    hq Member

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    From a personal point of view, I can and do appreciate Ruger products. A long time ago my first gun was a 5½" Mk.II .22. My favorite plinker is a custom 10/22. Even one of my favorite deer rifles is a .44 Deerfield Carbine.

    But... when I buy a revolver, it's even more of an emotional thing than with other firearms. My excuse is purely cosmetic, I don't like the looks of Ruger revolvers, with the possible exception of early Redhawk. I've much rather bought Colts and Smiths, even though some of them aren't nowhere near as durable or strong as Rugers, just strong enough and IMO much better looking guns.

    In a purely utilitarian world the only revolver you could ever need is a Ruger and the only semiauto is a Glock. Fortunately much of this gun enthusiasm we all share isn't about need but want. And at the moment I want another Colt, preferably a 6" nickel Diamondback. ;)
     
  11. Kynoch

    Kynoch member

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    Due largely to the Gun Control Act of 1968...
     
  12. 45_auto

    45_auto Member

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    There was 1 Ruger and about 250 S&W's in the International Revolver Championships this year.

    These are the best and most competitive revolver owners in the world. You really believe that over 99% of them would choose equipment that was not the best available?

    The reason you don't see many is the same reason that you don't see many Highpoints at the IDPA or IPSC championships. They're OK for the money, but not competitive performance-wise at the top levels. I own about a dozen Rugers, and they're fine for what they are and I have no intention to get rid of them. But I own about 3 or 4 times as many S&W's. Personally, I prefer to pay a little more for a better product.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2012
  13. j1

    j1 Member

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    Own and shoot both Ruger rifles and Ruger handgins and have liked each and every one of them. Good guns with absolutely no problems. Do I also like
    S & W? Yes I do. Am I selling any Rugers? No I am not.
     
  14. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    Which probably has more to do with S&W's faster action than anything else.


    What are their other choices???


    Given the cost-cutting going on at S&W, I find it laughable to compare Rugers to HiPoints and such high praise for S&W. :rolleyes:
     
  15. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    Same as everybody else's, sometimes not very good.


    How do you figure? In particular, I've got two $400 Rugers that shoot into 2"@50yds. You're picking two extreme examples. IMHO, way too much has been made about Ruger's bore size on the Single Six. Do we really think that 0.001" makes that much difference? Their reputation for less than stellar accuracy probably has more to do with the way they cut their chambers than anything else. These were never meant to be target guns and should not be expected to shoot alongside K-22's and Colt Officer's Models. That said, mine shoot under 1½"@25yds with preferred loads.
     
  16. 45_auto

    45_auto Member

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    I prefer to base my opinions on documented performance rather than feelings. But maybe we'll see you there next year with your Highpoints and Rugers! :neener:

    (But I doubt it, talk and internet bandwidth is cheap!)
     
  17. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    Feelings? No. At least I do not throw out such "evidence" without looking at "why". The why is S&W's action and faster trigger return. Period. Doesn't have a damn thing to do with quality or performance and you should know this.


    Indeed.
     
  18. 45_auto

    45_auto Member

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    Yeah, there's no real reason for slugging your bore and sizing your lead bullets to fit .001 oversize. Maybe you can get in touch with Dardas, Missouri Bullet co, etc, and let them know that your vast knowledge has determined that they don't really need to offer all those sizing options.
     
  19. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    We're not talking about centerfires and cast bullets, smart guy. Again, what is your problem??? Are we talking about guns or are we getting personal???
     
  20. 45_auto

    45_auto Member

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    No problem here. Just wondering how a bullet knows whether it's a centerfire or rimfire? Or maybe you don't use lead bullets in your rimfires, only jacketed?

    I find it laughable to believe that the type of ignition has any influence on whether a bore tolerance is important or not. ;)
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2012
  21. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    Apples and oranges. I'm sure you've rebarreled Single Sixes to find they shoot vastly better than before?

    My point, if I may reiterate and be more specific for the argumentative among us, is that people make a big deal about the Single Six's "compromise" bore diameter. It is my opinion, that this is blown greatly out of proportion and that the way Ruger cuts their chambers (all six at once) probably has more to do with the inaccuracy reputation than the bore. In my opinion, if the bore were oversized enough to cause problems with accuracy, it would also cause leading. It does not. Hence my point. :rolleyes:

    In my opinion, the Single Ten will probably prove to be a better shooter because they are no longer gang-cutting chambers. As far as I know, bore dimensions remain unchanged.
     
  22. 45_auto

    45_auto Member

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    Why would I? I'm sure that if there was any reason to or market for it, there would be literally hundreds of different aftermarket suppliers of them, kind of like 10/22 barrels. For what they are (a .22 plinker) they work fine.

    I'm sure the Single Tens will also.
     
  23. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    The most obvious answer would be because the end user can't change a Single Six barrel with screwdriver and an allen wrench. Changing the barrel on any revolver that is not a Dan Wesson requires gunsmith intervention. The market is there and would be an easy chore for any of our competent gunsmiths. In your vast intellectual superiority over we pitiful Ruger shooters, you should know this. Most folks are just happy to blast tin cans with them. As evidenced by Ruger selling all they can make for the last SIXTY YEARS.


    The one Jeff Quinn tested shot very well.

    http://www.gunblast.com/Ruger-SingleTen.htm
     
  24. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    There is a feature in Smith & Wesson's lockwork design that gives it an advantage in the double-action trigger pull department over Ruger's hand ejector revolvers.

    However their new LCR which is noted for it's exceptional D.A. pull, they "borrowed" and incorporated this feature.

    If one goes back to 1946 and backwards to 1905 Smith & Wesson's double-action trigger pulls really excel.

    Also if a competitor wants to use a cartridge with a bore diameter over .38, Ruger's Red Hawk and Super Red Hawk are seldom available in 4" barrel lengths, and are excessively heavy for these combat games. This is not to suggest that they aren't satisfactory for many other purposes.
     
  25. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    And Ruger has never really tried to compete with sixguns like the 625. Their large frame DA's have always been more sportsman-oriented. Personally, I'd like to see them expand the Super Redhawk platform to include other configurations and chamberings. Remove the frame extension such as this Bowen custom with standard Redhawk barrel.

    Super%20Redhawk%2001.jpg

    But it'll never compete directly with the 625 or 627 as used in competition.
     
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