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Ruger LCR 357 and difficult extraction

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Flfiremedic, Apr 4, 2011.

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  1. Flfiremedic

    Flfiremedic Member

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    Fired my LCR 357 for the first time, and there was notable difficulty in extraction of empties. Anyone else having this problem? No case damage or bulging that I can see.
     
  2. shootingthebreeze

    shootingthebreeze Member

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    East Lansing MI
    Question: Did you fire .357?
    My take is that if you observe the cylinder, the chambers are close together-and, I suspect being a new firearm, that problem will eventually go away.
    Metal is strange when stessed and possibly a break in is necessary. All of this is speculation though, but I suspect this is a transient problem.
     
  3. rich642z

    rich642z Member

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    Its brand new and,,,,,,,, you are going to have to work with the gun. When you take your LCR to the range and fire all 5 rounds in it turn it upside down and give a good wack on the ejector rod each time. Put a very tiny bit of oil on the rod to make it smoother and then it will work allright.
     
  4. Flfiremedic

    Flfiremedic Member

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    Ok...will go that route...gonna boresnake the chambers a few times and run some kinder gentler 357s at the range...then boresnake it and run one cylinder of hot stuff see how it goes.
     
  5. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    Cylinders won't "break in". Sticky extraction is a sign of either dirty cylinders, incorrect or bad machining of the cylinders themselves, brass that wasn't sized correctly or excessive pressure due to hot loads. Was it factory .357 or handloads? If it was standard factory ammo, you may have tight or rough cylinders. If it continues to be a problem, you should contact Ruger. Did you clean the cylinders before shooting? There may have been excessive oil or other crud in the cylinder. Was there any .38 special shot before the .357? Shooting .38s with their shorter cases will leave a carbon ring that can make extraction difficult. Look inside your cylinders. If the surface appears rough and pitted, you may need to have them polished.
     
  6. bayhawk2

    bayhawk2 Member

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    Jan 8, 2011
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    Location:
    S/W Texas
    Agree with Buck-Cylinders come factory shipped
    most of the time with a shipping grease.I would
    take a bronze brush and run through the cylinders
    and barrel.Some bore cleaner after that.Then a clean
    swab.Give them a really good cleaning.B/H
     
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