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Ruger LCR Durability

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by USBP1969, Aug 6, 2011.

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  1. stinger 327

    stinger 327 Member

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    Well the .38 +P or regular .38 special loads were enough for me in the LCR .38 gun. That LCR .357 I believe is 4 ounces heavier than the .38 LCR counterpart. Let us know how bad the recoil is.
     
  2. ForumSurfer

    ForumSurfer Member

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    I recently decided to switch from bottom feeders to a snub nosed revolver. I just need something I can slip in my pocket if need be and I'm not a fan of the sub-sub-compact bottom feeders (although my girlfriend appears to be, so I'll be purchasing some sub-sub-compact for comparisons sake once she makes up her mind). I had my heart set on an airweight. I went to pick one up and pulled the trigger on an LCR. Well I'm no revolver aficionado and I have no preferences, but the trigger feel and rock bottom used price sold me on the LCR.

    I'm not carrying it, yet. Lots of training since I've never really attempted practical revolver shooting. Things have been bust over the past two weeks that I've owned it, so I've only put about 300 38sp+p rounds through it of varying bullet weights and all of them were comfortable. I've reloaded it with snap caps about ten million times trying to get my technique down (reload, fumble, watch Jerry Miculek on youtube, wash, rinse and repeat). I've dry-fired it to death.

    I love the hogue grips and recoil isn't something I consider worth mentioning, honestly. I consider it a soft shooter, but recoil is so subjective that it is hard to discuss.

    Reliable? Who is to say? Ruger claims to have gotten an absurdly high round count out of one with no issue...but it IS ruger doing the testing. I'm happy with it, and for $300 I feel I'll have spent that many, many times over by the time I wear it out...if I wear it out. It is what it is, though...and that is a small revolver made out of polymer, aluminum and a little bit of steel here and there. I'd be hard pressed to argue that it will reach the same round count of an all steel revolver of the same size. It is what it is, though...and that is small, affordable and lightweight. I don't see why it won't last 10,000 rounds and well beyond.

    My only complaint is that although I am completely satisfied, I still want a s&w airweight and something sized similarly with a hammer that can handle 357's. Dang...now I'm getting back into revolvers, only a little more seriously this time.
     
  3. stinger 327

    stinger 327 Member

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    If you want real good concealment and comfort get one of those American Arms mini revolvers in either .22 LR or .22 Magnum. Very well made guns.
     
  4. Pegwedge

    Pegwedge Member

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    Just got home from the range a few minutes ago. The recoil with .357s was...tolerable. It stung the web of my hand a little bit but I don't think I'll be sore. I'm going to have to try some different loads to see if carrying it with .357s would be manageable. Need some more range time definitely.

    I need to thank USBP again. Those dry fire exercises definitely paid off. I was remarkably more accurate this evening than the other day. I'm loving this little gun more and more. Now if my holster would just get here...
     
  5. USBP1969

    USBP1969 Member

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    Thanks Pegwedge, that's really great to hear.

    Some additional thoughts:

    1) Using snap caps was a great idea. It's a lot easier on your LCR that-a-way.

    2) Please keep on practicing (dry firing). It can't help but help.

    3) If at all possible, dry fire and shoot with both eyes open. Closing one eye cuts down your tactical vision by ~ 33%. Additionally, if you are startled, both eyes will open as wide as possible, making it impossible to close one eye for accurate shooting.

    How does one determine which eye is dominant? Just form a small circle (about 2”) using the thumb and index fingers of both hands. Extend both hands a far as possible from your face and look at a distant object through that opening. Then, keeping that object in the center of that circle, move you hands back to your eye. The eye that ends up looking through the hole is your dominant eye. For shooting a hand gun it makes no difference which eye is dominant, regardless of whether you are right or left handed. The late Jeff Cooper of Gunsite once told me that he was “cross dominant.” That is, he shot with his right hand, but his left eye was dominant. He added that for photo shoots he pretended to be right eye dominant.

    If you see two targets or two sets of sights you can train your dominant eye to be more so by putting a piece of clear Scotch tape on the non-dominant eye’s shooting glass lens so that it makes that eye less able to focus on the target. Your brain will pick the eye with the better vision and train itself to use that eye over a period of time.

    3) There is a tendency to only practice with the strong (shooting) hand supported by the weak (Non-dominant) hand. That’s great for recreational shooting, hunting and self defense under optimum conditions. However, for saving one’s bacon in less than optimum conditions I highly recommend that you dry fire (and shoot) strong hand only as well as weak hand only, with 2/3 of the time spent with the gun in the weak (non-dominant) hand.

    4) Also, please spend time each range day shooting without sights. It’s easy and natural to do. This needs to be done live fire in order to get feedback from the bullet impact. A dirt bank with a small target is best, but if you are limited, as I am now, to an indoor range, then just reverse your target and point shoot at small 1” dots that you make with a felt tip or Sharpie. Starting at five to seven yards works best.

    Using two hands, simply reach out and try to touch the dot on the paper or the small target on the back stop with the tip of your barrel with your focus on the target. Whether you draw each time or come up from ready pistol, fire only one shot each target engagement. “Hosing” (multiple shots) is not beneficial to learning accurate point shooting. You will be surprised how quickly you become accurate firing one shot at a time. And…don’t forget right and left hand only point shooting. (Note: If using a paper target, fire no more than a cylinder full at each dot before pasting up the bullet holes. Firing more than that decreases the training value.)

    There are folks who say, “In the fight, front sight,” and they are absolutely right, if you can. If you are caught in what they call a “startled response” situation where your vision is riveted on the threat, or if you have an armed encounter in low light conditions, practicing point shooting can save the day. (or night)

    Just some old Firearms Instructor’s additional thoughts,
    -kent
     
  6. stinger 327

    stinger 327 Member

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    So it's bad to dry fire a LCR? I was told it was ok.
     
  7. USBP1969

    USBP1969 Member

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    Stinger - it's OK. :)

    It's just easier on the gun with snap caps as it cushions the impact of the hammer on the frame.

    I dry fire on a daly basis without them.

    -kent
     
  8. stinger 327

    stinger 327 Member

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    Had me worried there for a moment as I love to play around with this little toy. I guess one could also use the spent .38 shells also.
     
  9. DPris

    DPris Member Emeritus

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    Using fired brass is only good for one or two tries, after that the primer's so dented it provides no real cushioning.
    Denis
     
  10. stinger 327

    stinger 327 Member

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    I can see that happening.
     
  11. jkulysses

    jkulysses Member

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    I've put about 300 rounds through my 357 LCR with 200 of those being 357 mag rounds. The 38 and 38+p rounds can be shot all day long without it hurting my hand and barely any recoil. Depending on which 357 mag loads I shoot it varies from barely a sting that lasts for about 2 seconds to a sting that lasts about 10 minutes. I've never left the range with my hand still hurting. I love this gun and it is now my ccw of choice and I love the Mitch Rosen holster for it that I bought from the Ruger Store. Forget it's even there most of the time. The key to shooting this gun without it hurting your hand is make sure the web of your hand is up high on the back of the grip where the soft gel stuff is in the back of the grip. My 357 mag SP101 with the stock grips hurts the hand more than my lcr 357 mag. Put the Hogue grip on the SP101 and thats another story though. If you aren't concerned with weight and want more of an everyday shooter then the SP101 with hogue grips is what I would recommend. I carry my lcr with 357 Magtech hollow points because they only sting for a couple seconds. Even if you miss the blast of sound and fire is going to make them flee lol.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2011
  12. stinger 327

    stinger 327 Member

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    You have got to try the .38 +P 158 grain Buffalo Bore Ammo or better yet the Buffalo Bore Ammo in .357. There are a few different loads in .357 but the 125 grain 1,700fps? is a real kicker.
     
  13. Cop Bob

    Cop Bob Member

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    I can't speak to torture tests, or high round counts.. But I did buy an LCR for the Wife..

    Great fit n finish, light weight, Really nice trigger right outta the box.. I have put only 50 rounds through it, and they were wadcutters, but one thing I will say...

    It shoots to point of aim on the 11 yard line.. It appears to be all that and a bag of chips for a nice pocket pistol lightweight CCW, Boot gun etc... I cannot knock it at all, Well the sight could be a little sharper, but so could my eyes..

    I think Ruger did a nice job with this one.. It is small and light enough to were the wife actually carries it about all the time, and doesn't complain about the weight or it bothering her.. What more ya want?
     
  14. USBP1969

    USBP1969 Member

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    Well, sad to say it's a week later and I had to for go any shooting today due to pain and swelling in the web of my right hand. Maybe something was damaged last Friday shooting the 442's. And to think I just traded a S&W 351C .22 Magnum for a 442.

    -kent
     
  15. Strykervet

    Strykervet member

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    I have a 340PD. I think it is the best thing ever made for what it does. It weighs 14oz. loaded, and I've put it in my pocket and forgot I had it a few times. I don't care how big you are, carrying a heavy piece isn't as comfortable as a light one. If you need a high quality super light snub, this can't be beat. For everyday carry, I have a G29, but when I need something for the pocket in light shorts, I grab the 340.

    The 340PD is a .357mag, it'll handle 'em, but you won't like 'em. The thing is brutal, but that is what you get for super light weight. Most recoil of anything I've ever shot. Target practice with .38spcl., 158gr. non+P, is okay though. The lighter bullets hurt the worst. You anyway. It is fairly accurate for what it is, and it fills a specialty role better than anything else could: durability, firepower, size, and all being as light as possible, there isn't anything else quite like it.

    Now they make this think in several flavors now. There is the 340PD, scandium frame, titanium cylinder, this is the lightest one. I think of it as a specialty gun. Then there is the 340NG, the night guard, and it is the same frame with a stainless cylinder. Probably not AS brutal. There is the 640, and it is all stainless. All are hammerless, the low profile kind. There is also one like the 640 that is hammerless with the higher profile. Then all of these are made with hammers, just 360 instead of 340. That is in J-frame.

    I also have a 686+6", but they make it in 3" and a snub too. That would be my first choice for a carry revolver if I were to carry it exclusively. 7 shots and the trigger can be made into a world class setup. I got mine for a little over $200 in the late '90's and I wouldn't take $1000 for it today.

    The Smith and Wesson Night Guard series has a lot to choose from. All snubs from 2.5-2.75", all calibres from .38spcl.-.44mag, including 10mm and .45ACP. 5 shots to 8 shots in .357, all frame sizes, and 6 shots in most of the other ones.

    Oh, and Smith also makes this 8 shot .357 snub, a large frame snub. It is a custom shop piece. Scandium frame, titanium cylinder.

    The Ruger revolvers are well built, that they are, but I think the Smith revolvers have a better feel and a better trigger, and they come in soooo many flavors, it is hard not to find one that you like.

    I think plastic has no place on a revolver. That is where I draw the line plain and simple.
     
  16. snooperman

    snooperman Member

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    I agree parisite, my wife loves the LR too...

    it is a great gun for women... and men. The trigger is the best of the snubby guns out there and it shoots to point of aim at 30 feet. Ruger hit a "Grand Slam" with this one.
     
  17. stinger 327

    stinger 327 Member

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    One other reason I got one was that the trigger pull was very smooth and felt good. This gun also felt real good in my hands.
     
  18. browncoatdawn

    browncoatdawn Member

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    357 lcr?

    I have been out of action for a year now, and find myself in a wheelchair due to a nasty accident. Maybe I will walk again, but I know I am going to carry again. Finding options that work with a wheelchair are slim, I turned to the LCR. I love the feel so far, and will be picking up a 357 model as soon as I can. I figure it will handle all the 38 +p I can throw at it. My uncle gave me 9 boxes of old NyClad rounds, and I always favored Remington and Hornady ammo.

    This little giant seems to be the way to go in its class of CCW. The smith seemed to have a poor trigger, and the charter arms and taurus both lost out on feel.

    For range work, I have my Taurus 627ss and Ruger GP100 in the 357 mag, so I don't really mind an over built 38sp lol
     
  19. antiquus

    antiquus Member

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    Lost the LCR to the wife, who in spite of being a little arthritic has no trouble with with standard .38 rounds, I loaded it up with Nyclads.

    I have a 686+ 6" as well, and my daily is a 242 - trigger almost identical to the 686+ and same speedloaders. But as much as I like S&W, Ruger probably extended the life of the revolver 50 years with the LCR, and if imitation is the sincerest complement, S&W and Taurus must like the idea too.
     
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