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Ruger LCR

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by grant1265, Feb 25, 2011.

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  1. grant1265

    grant1265 Member

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    Just picked up a NIB Ruger LCR today and will not be able to shoot it for a while. Just want to hear some feedback on this gun and make sure it was a good choice in a snubbie. If you have this gun or have owned it before please give some info on accuracy for what it is and how it is overall.
     
  2. Jon Coppenbarger

    Jon Coppenbarger Member

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    have shot the 38 one and only at like 7 yards an it was a accurate and fun revolver. With the 357 out now alot of folks are really buying them.

    which one did you buy?
     
  3. Flint Ridge

    Flint Ridge Member

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    I have the .357 and really like it, though I shoot mostly .38 specials through it.

    Nice trigger. While you are waiting to shoot, why not get some snap caps and start getting comfy? I did about 2,000 dryfires (drop of oil each 1,000 per manual) and the trigger is even better - which I did not think possible.
     
  4. bikemutt
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    bikemutt Member

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    Great revolver, I love it. .38 special.

    Added XS front sight, nice.
     
  5. Flint Ridge

    Flint Ridge Member

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    +1 on the XS front sight I did that as well
     
  6. Magnumite

    Magnumite Member

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    It's a Ruger, no snap caps required.
     
  7. shootingthebreeze

    shootingthebreeze Member

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    My concern with the Ruger LCR and other "light" revolvers is the stress the revolver is sustaining especially with P+ loads.
    There have been failures reported relating to the Ruger LCR already. I'm concerned that aluminum frames just can't take the stress of sustained firing like at a range.
     
  8. shootingthebreeze

    shootingthebreeze Member

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  9. bikemutt
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    bikemutt Member

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    I agree the gun may not handle long term stress, especially with +P loads, then again it's really not intended to be a range gun.

    I would take mine to the range over say, a root canal. I find it unpleasant to shoot more than half a box through it.
     
  10. Flint Ridge

    Flint Ridge Member

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    Yes I know I don't have to have snap caps - I've got them and use them.
     
  11. DPris

    DPris Member

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    The .38 LCR can easily handle AT LEAST 5000 rounds of +P loads.
    At that point, you can expect some minor, but measurable, frame stretching.
    Should still be in specs.
    Denis
     
  12. shootingthebreeze

    shootingthebreeze Member

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    DPris, I'm still leary of such revolvers- I favor all around steel. Yes, these revolvers are not range guns-however, they need to be exercised at the range initially upon purchase to get used to their feel and so forth. My concern is failure at the wrong time during a defensive situation. Failure can never be predicted, and when I fire a weapon I want to be totally secure in the weapon's performance.
    In other words, I don't want a question mark in the back of me head when using it.
     
  13. bergmen

    bergmen Member.

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    Well, in the third sentence they claim that the "LCR is made of “aerospace grade” 7000 series aluminum."

    Since there is no such thing as "aerospace grade" aluminum of any type, I become suspect as to their credibility.

    Also, they indicate that it was likely fired with the cylinder out of time. Any revolver fired in this manner is subject to at least this amount of damage, maybe more. This can easily be induced by the operator if they are not indexing the cylinder after closure or turning the cylinder during closure.

    "It appears that the chamber was not properly aligned with the bore when the round fired, and that the bullet struck the forcing cone out of alignment. The bullet most likely took the path of least resistance, leading to the catastrophic failure of the barrel and frame subassembly."

    Dan
     
  14. shootingthebreeze

    shootingthebreeze Member

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    Perhaps I'm old school relating to aluminum frames. I just trust steel.
     
  15. DPris

    DPris Member

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    Shoot,
    I'm old enough to prefer walnut & steel myself, but I was actually surprised the LCR held up through that high a round count.

    I'm not trying to sell you on getting one, your choice entirely, I'm just passing on that the gun can handle AT LEAST that much use.

    I think too many people try to make it into a gun that it was never intended to be (as in regular extensive range use), but I agree that a defensive gun does need to be fired at least occasionally.

    I wouldn't have any doubts about the LCR with +Ps spread out over several years.

    Denis
     
  16. shootingthebreeze

    shootingthebreeze Member

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    Denis, I think that with the Ruger LCR, it would be prudent to shoot .38s at the range for practice initially, and of course occasionally, with a limited P+ just to get the feel for them if one elects to carry P+.
    I don't think it's wise to just shoot staright P+ all the time.
    After re-reading the post again it seems also that it was operator error, by not making sure the cylinder was properly seated. The article thus is a reminder for all of us to make sure the cylinder is properly seated when closed.

    Who knows? Perhaps my rigid thinking may change!! Just that firearm safety for me is really a big deal. I understand that Ruger over engineers their products, the LCR included. But I think that hot loads should not be fired all the time because of wear and tear. The .38 itself is a good defense round. Having the extra strength in construction should be a plus with .38.
     
  17. DPris

    DPris Member

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    Shooting with lower-pressure .38s will obviously extend the operational life of the LCR, but even with an exclusive diet of +Ps it'd take several years for most people to reach 5000, if used only occasionally.
    For most, I'd expect 5000 rounds to not even be reached.

    Ruger put 10,000 rounds (dunno how much was +P, if any) through one & said it began to wear the rifling, but was still shooting.
    Given the frame stretching at 5000, I'd expect 10,000 to be at the extreme edge of its lifespan.

    But- there's really not much need to be using +P at the range, aside from recoil familiarization.

    Denis
     
  18. Specs

    Specs Member

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    The KLCR 357 is steel, not aluminum. I have read that it is best to use snap caps with 1, I believe that some have developed trigger reset problems or something when dry fired without caps. They are cheap, why not use them? I do.
     
  19. grant1265

    grant1265 Member

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    I bought the standard lcr with the hogue tamers. .38+P only.
     
  20. DMZ

    DMZ Member

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    I predict you are going to like it.
     
  21. grant1265

    grant1265 Member

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    Thanks everyone, i actually just took it out to the range today shot about 125-150 rounds with my father and some guys we met at the range. It was unbelievably accurate for the less than 2" bbl. i was hitting bowling pins on a chain consistently from 25yrds with factory magtech, american eagle, and some reload 148gr wadcutters. The two guys there also let me shoot their baby desert eagle 9mm (accurate), romanian ak pistol(very fun by the way), and charter arms 1960's era undercover police i think(couldn't hit anything, but snubbies are always fun). Overall a great day at the range. The trigger on the lcr is the best da i have ever shot.
     
  22. BruiseLee

    BruiseLee Member

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    I haven't shot the LCR, but I checked out a bunch at the 2011 SHOT Show. I have to agree it has an excellent double action pull. I told the Ruger rep the action felt like an old Smith & Wesson K frame.

    BTW, I also checked out Taurus' similar polymer snubbie revolver. My friend and I agreed it had one of the worst trigger pulls of any gun I've ever handled of any type.
     
  23. not a pro

    not a pro Member

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    bought one in 38 spl. for the mrs. and she loves it. it'll be her ccw when we take courses this spring.
    we've been shooting wadcutters (mostly because the shop owner recommended them).

    any reasons why we shouldn't stick with wadcutters?
    other recommendations?
     
  24. Nushif

    Nushif Member

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    I got one when it first came out and it was my second gun I ever bought. That was the .38 variety.

    Put a lot of non +P through it, as I never got the tradeoff in shooting speed and comfort as compared to +P.

    It held up just fine and worked every time. Good to carry, fun to shoot, and a real conversation piece. What's not to like?
     
  25. Magnumite

    Magnumite Member

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    That LCR failure was most likely a barrel obstruction from a squib load. Any good DA revolver will properly index the cylinder no matter how it is closed. It is a function of the hand and extractor star timing. It cannot fire without the cylinder fully in battery because of the cylinder bolt interlock. The frame failure is unlikely because that would have been cumulative over a high round count, and the amount out of time caused by frame stretch would be negligible, the forcing cone would compensate for that. Furthermore, if the cylinder would have been that severely misaligned, the highest pressure would have been in the cylinder, with the cylinder showing signs of overpressure and impending/catastrophic failure.

    I tried this on my own LCR and over decades of working with my own revolvers. A revolver in good repair will not misalign that severely.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2011
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