Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Rust Never Sleeps! (Brownell's tests)

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Nathaniel Firethorn, Jul 24, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Nathaniel Firethorn

    Nathaniel Firethorn Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    1,672
    Location:
    Exit 8A, Peoples' Republic of Corzinistan
  2. cracked butt

    cracked butt Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    6,986
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    The results from WD-40 actually came as a big suprise to me. I don't allow that stuff anywhere near my guns, but now I'm reconsidering that position.
     
  3. Atticus

    Atticus Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,794
    Location:
    Ohio
    Interesting. I think WD40 gets a bad rap. I know people who have used it exclusively for years without a problem. A few weeks ago I was bored and curious.. so conducted a test. I had some old .38 rounds lying around, so I put them in a ziplock bag and sprayed them down with WD40. I soaked them overnight. The next day, I pulled the bullets, dumped the powder, and fired them in my model 19. All six primers detonated. Not scientific maybe...but it satisfied my curiousity about the persistant tales of a drop of WD40 ruining a primer.
     
  4. Bob F.

    Bob F. Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    Messages:
    1,118
    Location:
    Princeton, WV or thereabouts
    I really don't doubt a drop of any petroleum based solvent would ruin a primer---in a bit of time. I've used it(WD-40) a lot without problem. Clean the gun, spray and wipe dry. Don't leave liquid in the chambers or action!
    I like Tetra real well.

    Stay safe,
    Bob

    edited to add WD-40
     
  5. oldgold

    oldgold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Messages:
    434
    Location:
    ohio
    A family emergency resulted in me leaving my muzzleloader , uncleaned in the back of my car for three weeks. I had ran a couple of patches down the barrel and then wiped the lock and barrel down with a Rig soaked patch and then ramed the patch down the barrel with the range rod. Zero rust ! I was sure I had ruined a good gun. Rig saved it.

    Also I've been using WD-40 for years against all the 'expert' advise to the contrary.

    Rig for long term storage, WD-40 for everyday guns. Maybe this old dog has been right about something.

    Thanks for the link. Goldy
     
  6. mete

    mete Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    3,579
    Location:
    NY
    The original WD-40 was just a penetrant. Therefore it would penetrate around the primer and kill the primer mixture. Originally also WD-40 had no rust preventative and people who used it on guns or other steel had serious rust problems. After many complaints they changed the formula. Knowing it's history I have never used it.
     
  7. lee n. field

    lee n. field Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    3,731
    Interesting. I'd never heard of Boeshield before seeing review this morning. I spotted some at a hardware store today, and picked it up. I'll be giving it a try.
     
  8. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    12,349
    Location:
    DFW Area
    I've never had a bone to pick with WD-40s rust preventive abilities. I don't like it because it's a lousy lube and because it dries to a gummy varnish.

    I HATE it that they used Break-Free LP instead of CLP. The tests I've seen say that the CLP is a better rust preventive than the LP although I'm not exactly sure why that should be true.

    Also, exposing the test plates to direct rain means that this experiment tested the durability of the various formulations more than the rust preventive capabilities. Anything that dries hard or is thick and sticky is obviously going to do best because the rain drops won't be able to wash it off. Not surprising that the greases, the wax-like Boeshield and WD-40 which leaves a varnish like coating did the best.
     
  9. sm

    sm member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2002
    Messages:
    28,389
    Location:
    Between black coffee, and shiftn' gears
    RIG

    I have used RIG - since as long as I have been around.

    I do TREAT bores with RIG , always have, still do and will continue to do so.

    When I get new firearm, or actually clean the bore of one, I treat it with RIG. Now I don't get anal as folks do about cleaning bbls, I concern my with chambers. I do shoot in rain, get muddy, expose to snow,...etc.

    I do what it takes to remedy whatever I have exposed the firearm to. I have had to separate the metal from wood...dissassembly...because for instance shooting in 30* F temps, with rain, sleet and snow during a tournament...everything gets soaked. I do mean everything.

    A light film of RIG is all it takes. I do internals as well. I have used in 125* F with the Heat index...and -5* with the wind chill factor.

    Under stocks, grips ...etc. as well.

    Now what I discoverd by accident...and shared with CRSam...I needed to clean a gun and had no solvent ( like I said, I don't get wrapped around the axel about all this stuff). I applied RIG using a long Cotton applicator, swabbed bbl, let sit and we went to eat. We did stop and buy solvent while out. Didn't need it...could have saved money...

    I used a Otis pull through on the revolver bbl...removed the RIG and all sorts of fouling came with it. I knew RIG "seeps under and into metal"...well by golly, I knew the stuff was good ( never had a problem with RIG) but this was incredible! I used nothing else, the bbl was clean . I treated bore like always , as I did the rest of the gun. It does not take much.

    The RIG+P does this too. WE kept trying to tell ya...:p
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page