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Rust-Oleum is better stock paint better than Duracoat…

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Ru4real, Nov 20, 2022.

  1. Ru4real

    Ru4real Member

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    I’ve used multiple types of paint for stocks. Duracoat seemed to be the best until I tried this new Rustoleum.

    I’m not sure what the glue binder is that holds the sand but it forms a super hard shell and binds to the base much better than even Duracoat.

    A few examples of turning plane Jane black plastic stocks into a wood like feel. Tikka, Savage, Rock Island.

    View attachment 1116156
     
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  2. drband

    drband Member

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    Certainly looks great!
     
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  3. CoalCrackerAl

    CoalCrackerAl Member

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    Well done they look great. :thumbup:
     
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  4. rbernie

    rbernie Member

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    Looks great! Textured paint is great for hiding surface or application flaws - I'm a cosmetic fan, as long as it doesn't make cheekweld uncomfortable in the process. How do they feel when you shoot 'em?

    Oh, and let us know how they weather; it'll be interesting to hear if they chip more than scuff.
     
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  5. Ru4real

    Ru4real Member

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    When shooting, no change on the cheek. The surface feel is very similar to a factory textured stock.
     
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  6. Robert

    Robert Administrator Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    I'm a huge fan of rattle can paint jobs. They are just, more authentic to me. Rust-Oleum makes a great product. I used their paints for the majority of my AR308 paint job. I coated it all in a flat clear coat and it looks great, and is holding up great too.
     
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  7. CoalCrackerAl

    CoalCrackerAl Member

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    Nice Rob.:thumbup:
     
  8. Bfh_auto

    Bfh_auto Member

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    I've have to give it to you. That is a 5 star rattle can job. I always hated painted guns. But I may change my mind.
     
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  9. Remington1911

    Remington1911 Member

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    I freely admit that I just don't get it.....why paint it. Then I think and oh yea 99% of my stuff is wood. I think I have one plastic firearm, I have about 3 air rifles that are in plastic....everything else is wood.

    I understand painting the plastic, you really can't make it any worse, and as these photos show you can make it darn good looking. I even bought paint several years ago, read up on doing it, cleaning the stock and all that.....just never did it, afraid of screwing it up.
     
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  10. Sav .250

    Sav .250 Member

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    Good job..............
     
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  11. GooseGestapo

    GooseGestapo Member

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    I’ve used the Rustoleum textured paint for several years.
    The nice thing about paint is that if it does get defaced, it’s easily stripped and redone.

    I’ve even done the furniture on one of my AR15’s as the black really stands out in our foliage during hunting season as everything turns shades of tan and brown...
     
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  12. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

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    Exactly which Rustoleum product are we talking about? What’s it labeled? Thanks
     
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  13. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    I've used the textured paint on a few rifle/shotgun stocks over the years. It is good stuff that provides a sure grip on the firearm all over, not just where the checkering is. I've camouflaged a few shotguns for turkey hunting too, but prefer not to use textured paint on metal.

     
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  14. dekibg

    dekibg Member

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    Can you please tell us about prepping surfaces and how many layers you did, drying times etc?
    Is there a way to add a little bit of wood grain appearance by using a brush with maybe a little bit of black paint ?
     
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  15. Jimster

    Jimster Member

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    9D0E6FC3-BDBA-4D0C-96A1-B1C94CEC758F.jpeg My Rustoleum painted AR is holding up very well. I used the rattle cans and dabbed with a couple of torn sponge pieces. It was fun and I like the look.
     
  16. GooseGestapo

    GooseGestapo Member

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    See the photo in post #1.
    Multi color Brown. Textured.
     
  17. Aim1

    Aim1 Member

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    Although I appreciate beautiful wood and blued guns I prefer stainless and black plastic.


    I remember in the late 1990's Shooting Times doing a cover and it showed 2 stainless rifles and the title was, "The Stampede to Stainless".
     
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  18. Ranger99

    Ranger99 Member

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    I've painted several shotguns and rifles.
    They were used for hunting, and painted
    to reduce glare and and help to break
    up the outline of the gun since it's the
    thing about me that's closest to the
    animal/bird's eyes
    Just me- I use krylon spray paint.
    The animals and birds can't tell the
    difference between a $10.00 shake
    shake spray job and $100.00 + of
    professionally applied coatings.

    Probably already posted these
    in past days
     

    Attached Files:

  19. Pat Riot

    Pat Riot Member

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    Just don’t rattle a paint a Parkerized gun then expect to get it all off if you don’t like the outcome. I have a black Mossberg 500 that has the loveliest green hue in the sun. :rofl:

    I have tried to capture this green hue with a phone camera. It just doesn’t show up in photos the way it actually looks.
    Here’s the best shot I have showing done hue on the metal parts of the gun.
    5E66EC30-902F-494E-A752-7336F88E8DF5.jpeg
     
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  20. kje54

    kje54 Member

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    Rattle canned my Norinco M37.

    Ec4zhcshHWsDbKlBrQawU809ypORIomZlHloV3WB7adVMg0TWfEWk1KMDy9mxj_e8Rv2jdw=w1102-h826-no?authuser=0.jpg

    pJ5X1YK9at2XhTGzB85gURkxYkjR36qACfqRr8dqcqJCfbEyskgwG6ms1nj0UWSw0GNaaJA=w1102-h826-no?authuser=0.jpg

    RWj1-z1ujnJdv7Qv37YN0l2aoVw_O3QnPhcz0H2WnERD4KQSnxg2F6W27waEzCVFixqp1Yw=w1102-h826-no?authuser=0.jpg
     
  21. trackskippy

    trackskippy Member

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    Brownells has, or at least used to have, a couple of good videos on painting and prep. Was mainly geared to their Aluma Hyde II paints, but it applies to any of them really.

    The main thing is to degrease everything well (I usually do it twice, with the second round just before I paint) and that includes your hands while youre painting and handling the gun.

    Before you start, plan out how you will hang or allow it to dry, otherwise youll be looking silly standing there holding it while it drys. :p

    I used to break things down into parts and paint, but thats really just a PITA and unnecessary, unless youre not going to paint all of it. For camo jobs, the whole gun gets painted, and I just tape off whatever I dont want painted, like the sights, glass, etc.

    A hairdryer is a big help in "setting" the coats.

    Your best bet is to paint the whole gun with a base color, which is usually the lightest and most prevalent in the pattern, and then go with the next darkest as you go down the line. I know its hard not to, but, dont get too carried away and "busy" with things, less is better and its easier to add later than it is to do it over.

    If youre experimenting, trying something new, do it first on a piece of 2x3 or something similar and see how it goes. If youre looking for a wood grain look, Id check out some of the antique furniture restoration sites for hints. My grandmother used to do that sort of thing, and while it wasnt actual wood grain, it often had that look.

    Ive been painting things since the late 60's, and we always painted our hunting guns, especially the bird guns. It just naturally carried over to other things as well.

    This is a rough version of Multicam, which is one of the easier spray patterns to do.

    8WJYzQR_q_dc-F5BNyntOLdWDP5ZdA7LI-ODz9UWaXj6Idy1V-UvJvcnuGk?cn=THISLIFE&res=medium&ts=1298229627.jpg
    Started doing it when I switched over to the pattern back in the late 90's.
    8WJYzQR_q_dc-F5BNyntOLdWDP5ZdA7LI-ODz_RE3sAHUCOnqvSk39rdhFw?cn=THISLIFE&res=medium&ts=1298229658.jpg
    This is the same gun (different light) about 10 years out now. If you look close, you can see where things wear, but considering how much use its gotten in that time, it holds up well.
    y8WJYzQR_q_dc-F5BNyntOLdWDP5ZdA7LI-ODz8zy4BGvmnmocprDJnLnODO?cn=THISLIFE&res=small&ts=1558100498.jpg
    y8WJYzQR_q_dc-F5BNyntOLdWDP5ZdA7LI-ODz-HIGanMrPYPph2jOi4Peow?cn=THISLIFE&res=small&ts=1558100516.jpg

    Ive stripped the paint off of guns Id painted 25 years before, that were hard use guns and used heavily as hunting/truck guns, etc, and except for maybe one or two spots where the paint had worn completely off, and the finish was exposed, the original finish underneath was pristine, wood and metal. Paint is a great preservative in that respect. You just need to use paints that are completely removable if you plan on stripping them later.

    Dont use Aluma Hyde II for that. :thumbup:
     
  22. Ru4real

    Ru4real Member

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    1. Remove hardware, action, butt pad, etc.
    2. Rough the stock up.
    3. Mask off barrel channel, trigger channel, emblems, etc.
    4. Hang stock in garage or similar.
    5. Degrease. Duracoat kits come with a spray can degreaser which flashes off quickly. I spray a clean rag and
    wipe down with rag. I’ve bought several kits thus had degreaser on hand. Brake cleaner would work.
    6. Shoot it with textured paint.
    7. Half hour later bring in house for 24 hours.
    8. Reinstall hardware, etc.

    The Savage stock had a Duracoat finish already. I painted Rust-Oleum textured paint over the Duracoat but also masked the Duracoat in a few spots to create effect. When I pulled the blue painters masking tape, the Duracoat came off in spots. When I sprayed the Duracoat I prepped properly. Just an “oily” cheap synthetic stock.

    I thought, going to be a waste because the Rust-oleum layer will be crap due to the bad Duracoat layer. I gave it two weeks and then tried to chip and peel the Rust-Oleum off to test its weakness. It formed a shell, like on an M&M and is tough!
     
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  23. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

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    I used Duracoat on an aluminum 1911 frame. Doesn't surprise me that Rust ollum works better. Eventually I am going to redo it in a different finish. Either Aluma-hyde, Cerakote or something.
     
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  24. BushMaster-15

    BushMaster-15 Member

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    Location:
    Planet Earth
    Aerowave 5001 ;

    Aerospace Urethanes type 1 type ll are Nasty tough stuff . Be sure YOU know what you want before application because aircraft stripper WON'T remove it not even acetone lacquer thinner nor T18 hot thinner . It can be BURNT off but more than likely your rifle would melt before that happened .

    https://aerospace.akzonobel.com/en/products/aerowave-5001-arc

    Deft Aerospace ,now a division of PPG also manufactures Type 1 & 2

    https://www.aerocoat.com/deft/

    Sprayed barrels of the stuff ,but NEVER over 64 O/Z per 24 hr. period ,as Aliphatic Isocyanate Polyurethanes Type 1 & ll can be deadly with regard to respiratory system ,aka airborne . Even with PARE full suits . It doesn't get tougher than that stuff unless you go DLC BAM or Ceramic :)

    MIL-PRF-85285 Polyurethane Coating is an aerospace grade, multi-component chemically cured product that forms a film that is resistant to chemicals, solvents and abrasion. This coating has excellent adhesion to most substrates and is recommended for heavy duty industrial applications where a tough, resilient finish is required.
     
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  25. wesmonster

    wesmonster Member

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    +1 on Rustoleum. They have a good selection of colors in flats & semi flats.
    Used on both new & old firearms, bare & previously painted. All are holding up well.

    For me the easiest/quickest prep is a wipe down with alcohol wipes. Ready to shoot in 10 min. If you don't have any wet nap style pre-packaged alcohol wipes there are alcohol based wet wipe/baby wipes.
    If you're serious, wipe down with paint thinner or lacquer thinner or mineral spirits. Once dry blow off any bits of threads or fluff from your wipe down rag with canned air or a compressor. Wear rubber or nitride gloves to keep fingerprints off.

    I'm lazy and use an old round grill grate set on top of a trash can in my shop. It's probably got a hundred coats of spray paint by now.
     
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