Rust Question

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by bsparker, Apr 10, 2022.

  1. bsparker

    bsparker Member

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    I’ve got a .410 O/U that I inherited about 15 years ago. I took the fore-end stock off and found a small patch of rust developing. At longest it’s just under 1/2”. If I recall, it’s been like this for at least ten years (when I first noticed it).

    What’s the best way to clean this and keep this from getting worse?

    It’s not deep, so I assume it’s still safe to shoot, but correct me if I’m wrong.

    BA518685-8490-473C-A3CD-B64CA9DDF449.jpeg
     
  2. Airborne Falcon
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    Airborne Falcon #AATW 2/325 1/509 4/325 Jumpmaster

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    Whatever you do don't use wire or steel wool.

    Go lightly with one of your old tooth brushes and some WD 40 and/or maybe very very lightly with some WD 40 or CLP and little cut piece of a green scotch brite pad. Get the fine one and tread lightly. Don't scratch.

    I'd start with the toothbrush and WD 40 and then cut about a 2" square piece of green pad and try to to get down in that corner then go back with the tooth brush. Careful not to remove any of that beautiful old patina.

    Then wipe the whole thing down with CLP or similar.
     
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  3. doubleh

    doubleh Member

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    You have to completely remove the rust or kill it or it will just return. It's going to be difficult to completely remove all of it because of where it is located. There are chemical rust converters available that will kill it by converting it into black oxide. You might research that. I have successfully used one called oxpho in the past, just not on a very small spot like on your gun.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2022
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  4. Shanvanvocht

    Shanvanvocht Member

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    Goood advice. Look in your LGS (or hardware store) for a set of cleaning brushes. Usually there will be one steel, one brass/bronze, and one nylon; they are narrower than a toothbrush and will get into narrow spaces. As for the Scotch-Brite pads, the blue ones are not as course as the green and you can find even finer ones in an auto parts store that has body shop supplies. Auto stores also carry a product called rust converter which chemically bonds with iron oxide and will prevent further corrosion in case you are unable to remove all the rust.
     
  5. Deus Machina

    Deus Machina Member

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    That's about my Hierarchy of Removal. Scotchbrite, nylon and then brass brush (after a careful test on a hidden spot), and I've used the ultra-fine steel wool on modern guns. The bluing may be tougher on those.
    Lubricate any of these methods with WD40.
    If those fail, try a rust converter. DO NOT try a rust remover unless it's confirmed safe. Many target all oxides, and bluing is a controlled oxide application.

    My great-uncle claimed it was possible to put the part in boiling water and it would blacken and become passive. There is indeed a bluing method called 'rust bluing' that does exactly that, but I think it depends on the controlled conditions that's done under. He was a tool and knife maker, my dad still has a few pieces he treated that way, but I'm betting he left out some details when he told dad he "could just boil it" if he had a container big enough. Uncle Jim did, and probably intended to refinish the rusted parts completely but was playing it down as his way to refuse payment.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2022
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  6. Legionnaire
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    Legionnaire Member

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    Be real careful with chemical rust removers; they can take the blue as well. I disagree with the advice against steel wool; that's exactly what I'd use: very fine steel wool and some gun oil.
     
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  7. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    Bluing IS rust, so no rust removing chemicals. I'd scrub it clean as possible with a pick and 0000 steel wool, then Rustoleum paint to protect it.
     
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  8. Waveski

    Waveski Member

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    Bronze wool is useful.
    Steel wool can get you into trouble right quick.
     
  9. dcloco

    dcloco Member

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    Toothbrush and a product called "Gun Brite" - made by Iosso.

    Stops rust and prevents future rust.
     
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  10. Remington1911

    Remington1911 Member

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    IMHO that is a rough spot to get to, right in the corner.

    Only thing I will comment on is I have used 000 and 0000 steel wool on many guns, as well as the old penny trick, I think you need a pre 1980 penny, whenever they quit using all copper. Nice and oily and not much pressure, can do wonders.


    Story time......

    Guy across the road left a shotgun out leaning against my shop. He came over and we are busting clays in my back yard.....I never saw it. He called me that next weekend, did I leave my shotgun over there.....no, I go to get the mower out and guess what leaning next to the door is his shotgun....oh god. I called him and said yea it is here and leaning against the door I found it when I went to get the mower....it looked like hell. Little rust everywhere and the wood looked horrid. It was his fathers and he was just heart broken. He was just going to stick it in the back of the safe and just cry over it.

    Let me work on it for a bit, I think I can help it.

    The wood got cleaned, ballastol, wax. The metal got the oil and penny trick as well as the 0000 (I think) it was not that bad, just looked bad and oil as well as a total tear down, and little parts tossed in the sonic cleaner.

    Really I was shocked at how well it came out. My wife and his wife quilt and she picked it up, she said it never looked so good and he had been down all week. S happens, not to worry and anytime.

    He was really happy with the results, but he is careful to put in his car what we are finished with that day.

    There is a downside to this story however, you will endup getting more stuff to make work, and or clean up.
     
  11. rust collector
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    rust collector Moderator Staff Member

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    The worrisome part for me is the location right at the monobloc/tube junction. While there is plenty of metal there in a .410, it is likely that the moisture got into the joint. My suggestion would be to remove the ejector, apply the old WD-40 and 0000 steel or bronze wool to knock down the worst of it, and periodically apply Eezox or some other rust protectant. Be sure to scrutinize the chamber area to ensure no rust has made its way in.

    I was tempted to recommend rust converter, but I have no experience in using on a gun and some warn against high temperature use. The most important thing is to stop the rust from spreading, and the best way is to remove existing moisture and keep new moisture out.
     
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  12. sonora

    sonora Member

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    I agree a small wad of Bronze Wool and couple drops of gun oil. Go lightly with a small circular motion.
     
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  13. theotherwaldo

    theotherwaldo Member

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    I've used the copper penny trick many a time.
     
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  14. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    I wonder, if you scraped a patch of rust with a zinc penny, would it Sherardize the steel?
     
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  15. Remington1911

    Remington1911 Member

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    Like so many said, rust is just like cancer, you must get all of it. It is not called car cancer for nothing.
     
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  16. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

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    A little wd40 wipe down every 2-3 months will keep from happening again. Wipe on, lightly wipe off. Good stuff.
     
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  17. J-Bar

    J-Bar Member

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    After removing the rust with the method that appeals to you, I would cover that area with a thin coat of Mobil 1 grease. The goal is to keep oxygen from the air or from moisture off that surface and grease will last longer than an oil. Mobile 1 is inexpensive and plays well with firearms, even those burning black powder.
     
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  18. beag_nut

    beag_nut Member

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    Another option for removal is: Fiberglass Scratch Brush Pen, from Amazon. When I used to make SS surgical instruments, those brushes were the only approved method for removing any type of rust, from any sort of steel. They leave NOTHING behind to cause more rust in the future, and are a LOT harder than bronze. Plus, they work in small areas. Luckily I was able to store away a couple of those brushes back then, and now use them for special circumstances. Oxpho Blue will touch up the lost bluing, and gun oil will protect the new bluing.
     
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  19. Airborne Falcon
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    Airborne Falcon #AATW 2/325 1/509 4/325 Jumpmaster

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    So now that you've been given a myriad of ways to remove the rust, now is the time to treat it.

    One quick thing, you might use a dental pick to feel-out the rust and get the worst of it off before going-to-work with brushes and pads. Especially down in those inner corners.

    Someone mentioned ospho. I've used that stuff on everything from steel beams to wheel wells. It works really well. We used to buy it by the drum. Make sure that if you decide to use it that you just barely use a drop at the max. Situate fhe shotgun so that, if you do accidentally overdo-it it stays down in that corner by gravity. Find a little bitty pointed brush.

    As far as any of this affecting the structural integrity of your shotgun .... seriously doubtful. You're good if all that is is a little surface rust. You'll find out for sure once you pick at it a bit with the dental pick.

    Good luck :)
     
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  20. bsparker

    bsparker Member

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    Thanks for the ideas, suggestions and tips. I hope to find some time this week to start the process. I'll report back after I've had some time to weigh the different approaches and get started.
     
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  21. bigmike45

    bigmike45 Member

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    Use whatever method you have read about here to remove the rust, then let me suggest something I have been using on blued guns for over 3 decades. It's called RIG which stands for Rust Inhibiting Grease. It's made by Birchwood Casey. I clean a lot of guns for a lot of people and this is what I use and in 3 decades it has never let me down. I leave the gun in the sun to warm up the metal then apply a thin coat with a rag.
    81ym8N3RdEL._AC_SX425_.jpg
     
  22. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

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    It extends under the barrel so you are going to have to take it apart some to get all of it.

    I would start with using 0000 steel wool wet with gun oil. Any type of gun oil really. As long as it is 0000 steel wool. That fine of wool won't harm the bluing and will get most or all of that rust off. If it doesn't you have to move up to something more aggressive like a bronze bristle toothbrush and oil.

    Once you get it off you have to prevent it from happening again. Keeping the area oiled or greased is the ticket. Lots of lube brands come with a little tube that sticks in the spray nozzle. Those are very useful for getting into tight areas like that.
     
  23. Middletown

    Middletown Member

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    I have had good results with CLP. I would get it warm, set in direct sunlight, hair dryer whatever and apply the spray can CLP, it foams. Let set for a day (or week) and then start with compressed air and then do it again. Sounds like you don't have to be in a hurry so let time be your friend.
     
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