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S&W model 14-3 sear issue please help!

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Kizney, Jan 31, 2019.

  1. Kizney

    Kizney Member

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    First post guys. I just picked up a 14-3 6". IF I let off the trigger slowly, it doesn't reset. The sear is not going back over the trigger unless you let the trigger off fast OR if you let it rest slowly, you have to push the trigger forward just a TINY bit OR pull the trigger back a TINY bit. I am attaching 2 pics of the sear/trigger interface when i let the trigger reset slowly.
    sear1.JPG

    this is the sear not resetting.
    sear2.JPG

    after I push trigger forward a TINY bit. you can see the slightly smaller gap near where the trigger stop would be. I removed it to make sure it wasn't causing the issue. SO....new sear? new sear spring? new rebound slide spring? Sorry for all the oil, i was cleaning the pistol. THANKS GUYS!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 1, 2019
  2. MrBorland

    MrBorland Moderator

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    As you can see, re-engaging the DA sear happens very late in the return, so it's important the trigger fully return fully and under all conditions (IOW, you shouldn't have to let it out quickly to reset). Your issue could stem from a number of things, but top of my list is either a rebound spring that's too light for the mainspring and/or a DA sear that's a smidge too long.

    If the SA trigger feels scary light (assuming you know what normal and "scary light" for a S&W revolver is), it's possible someone swapped out the rebound spring for one that's too light. A trigger gauge really ought to be used. If you do have a trigger gauge, measure both the DA and SA pull weights. If the revolver is stock, they ought to measure approximately 11-12 and 3-4lbs, respectively. If someone swapped the springs, the weights might be lower, but the DA:SA pull weight ratio should, IME, be in the area of 2.5-3:1 (I call it 2.8:1). A ratio that's notably higher than this would reflect a relatively light rebound spring.

    A DA sear that's a smidge too long has trouble resetting past the hammer nose. You can see how this might be so in your first pic. A qualified gunsmith really ought to make this call and do the work, if needed.

    There could also be a burr somewhere in the action. Again, a gunsmith could make that call.
     
    km101 likes this.
  3. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Be my bet too, and easy to replace with a stock length/weight spring. An easy try since you have it open already.
     
  4. Taurus 617 CCW

    Taurus 617 CCW Member

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    I will third taking a liik at the rebound spring first. Get the rebound spring tool from Brownells or Midway. It will make life a lot easier for you.
     
  5. Kizney

    Kizney Member

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    I use the Miculek ball point pen trick to get em out and in. Rebound spring seems to be the common soln...a gentleman from S&w forum s mailing me a new one. ill use the hammer spring from my 686-3 to test in unison. will update with progress. thanks guys.
     
  6. Kizney

    Kizney Member

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    i may polish the sear interface as well
     
  7. Master Blaster

    Master Blaster Member

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    a rebound spring that's too light for the mainspring

    Never keep full tension on the Mainspring with the side plate off, it can bend the Hammer pin which would require professional repair.
     
  8. Taurus 617 CCW

    Taurus 617 CCW Member

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    Be careful when polishing sear surfaces, especially the single action shelf. I wouldn’t even touch that one. I would only recommend polishing if the spring change doesn’t work and that’s if you know what you are doing. If you don’t feel confident, leave that part foe the gunsmith. I have worked on many S&W revolvers myself but I only attempt what is in my scope of capabilities. Keep us updated on the situation after the spring arrives.
     
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  9. Kizney

    Kizney Member

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    agree, not touching single action surfaces.
     
  10. LoneGoose

    LoneGoose Member

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    I had a trigger problem once and discovered the strain screw had backed out just a little bit. Tightened it up and it got fixed. It was less than half a turn.
     
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  11. Kizney

    Kizney Member

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    strain screw tight. but im wondering if someone along the way shortened it, ill have to compare to another k frame.
     
  12. Kizney

    Kizney Member

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    rebound spring and mainpring replacement didnt help, I am stoning the bottom of the removable hammer sear. going slow will update. almost lost sear spring, LOL
     
  13. Kizney

    Kizney Member

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    FIXED.
     
  14. Kizney

    Kizney Member

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    IMG_2534.jpg took just a TINY bit off the bottom and polished like 80%
     
  15. LoneGoose

    LoneGoose Member

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    Congratulations. That's a "feel good" moment.
     
  16. Kizney

    Kizney Member

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    AHHH MAN felt soo good. the new rebound spring ALMOST got it to where the DA sear would clear the shelf...polished and reassembled hammer 3x. I didnt want to take too much off AT ALL. it has one of the smoothest triggers of any of my s&w's...49years old and its been shot a lot. got shot more today, finally managed to get out to the club and ring some steel w/some mouse farts. tons of fun.
     
    drband and Walkalong like this.
  17. Eddietruett

    Eddietruett Member

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    Glad you got it fixed. The original pictures looked like it was drenched in oil or is that just the way the pictures turned out? I know it had nothing to do with your problem, but I'd be worried all of that oil would run out and get on something it shouldn't
     
  18. forrest r

    forrest r Member

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    FWIW:
    Polishing all the internal parts with jb bore paste & a cloth wheel on a dremel tool including the rebound spring. Then using heat & treating them with moly paste.
    gOklDQ9.jpg

    Doing this lightens the trigger pull #+, increases the lock time of the revolver while maintaining excellent primer hits.

    Typically we'll take a s&w revolver and tighten the strain screw down all the way then back it out a 1/2 turn and test loads with federal primers. If they go bang the strain screw gets turned out another 1/2 turn and then re-tested with federal primers. We wash-rinse-repeat this until we get lite fp hits/can't ignite federal primers. Count the # of 1/2 turns it took to get the lite strikes and write it down. The the revolver gets taken apart and all the internals polished and treated with moly. Then the revolver gets re-assembled and if needed shims installed. Put the strain screw in all the way and then back it out the # of 1/2 turns it took to get lite strikes on the federal primers and re-test.

    I have yet to see a revolver not set off the federal primers after the rework/polishing/moly treating of the internals.
     
  19. Eddietruett

    Eddietruett Member

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    2 questions. How long does the moly treatment last? And I didn't understand the part about using shims if needed. What kind of shims and is there something you are doing that might create the need for a shim? I got lost somewhere.
     
  20. forrest r

    forrest r Member

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    Moly will last the life of the firearm and a lot longer. This is different than shooting moly coated bullets or using moly lube on cast bullets. And unlike the coated moly bullets/moisture issues, there is no issues when treating metal this way Doing this the moly penetrates into the metal forming a lube layer a lot like sharks skin.
    Traditional vs sharks skin:
    Take 2 pieces of 1" flat stock steel and polish/mate the surfaces. Their contact point/friction point will be 1" wide. Take 2 1" files and knock the sharp edges off of them and polish/mate the surfaces. Even though the files are 1" wide they will only have 1/2" of contact point/friction, hence shark skin.

    Automotive engines are an excellent example of what moly treated metal brings to the table. No break in 3x+ the millage before rebuilds.

    I either make my own shims or buy them, typically it's a combination of both. Shims look like small washers and are very in thickness, 2/1000th's, 4/1000th's, custom, etc. They are used to lower rub/friction points along with centering the hammer & trigger to their mating surfaces.

    If you have a trigger group apart and polished/inspected everything, take the extra step to moly and shim (if needed) that trigger group. The difference between a simple polish and re-install and a polish/moly/shim/hand fit will easily take another #+ off the trigger pull.

    Anyway, moly is 1 of those products out there that most people see moly & bore in the same sentence and automatically turn away & never look back/give it a second thought. Trigger groups benefit from it. I've had fantastic results re-working the bolts on bolt action rifles and moly treating them, had as much as a 40% reduction in group size & the increased lock time is a bonus. Cuts down the wear on semi-auto bolts and is excellent for the fp/fp channel. Get a 1911 right & tight then treat the bbl lugs and the bbl/bbl bushing contact point.
     
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