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Safe revolver carry?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by HKGuns, Aug 25, 2012.

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  1. HKGuns

    HKGuns Member

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    Looking for input on best practice for revolver carry.... Should you always carry a revolver with the hammer over an empty cylinder? Or, does it depend on the revolver? Looking for some sage knowledge on this topic.

    I figured this would have been covered previously, but my search turned up squat.

    Thanks for your input.
     
  2. JERRY

    JERRY Member

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    Wheres the tongue in cheek smilie when you need one?
     
  3. HKGuns

    HKGuns Member

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    Huh? Not following you Jerry. It sounds like you think I am not serious, I am a former auto only lifetime shooter who only recently discovered revolvers. It really is a serious question, perhaps stupid, but serious. I can't control my revolver ignorance.
     
  4. JERRY

    JERRY Member

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    O.k., i will play along....

    What exact revolver are you speaking about?
     
  5. HKGuns

    HKGuns Member

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    I currently own only three revolvers. Two model 29's and a model 10. But if there are exceptions I'd like to understand those and the reasoning as well.
     
  6. bikemutt
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    bikemutt Member

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    On my deep conceal revolvers that are pocket holstered I tend to leave the next chamber up to bat empty. The first trigger squeeze will be a dud, deliberate or otherwise.
     
  7. JERRY

    JERRY Member

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    Carry them all fully loaded as in a round in every chamber.
     
  8. Bubba613

    Bubba613 member

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    Uh yeah.
    No revolver made in the last 100 years probably will go off unless you pull the trigger. I carry two revolvers, both fully loaded.
     
  9. HKGuns

    HKGuns Member

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    Great. Pretty simple then, but wanted to ask and not assume anything. Thanks for the fast decisive, responses. Sorry if it was a completely ignorant question.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2012
  10. Buford57

    Buford57 Member

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    All of the models you mentioned are safe to carry with all chambers loaded.

    That empty chamber routine is a holdover from the Colt single action. The only reason for an empty chamber under the hammer is to prevent a blow to the hammer from causing an accidental discharge. Modern double action revolvers such as yours and even modern single actions have internal safety features to prevent this.

    If you don't know, you have to ask. No problem with that.
     
  11. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    I think rather than explaining the technology I think it would be best if you demonstrated to yourself how a revolver safety works.

    UNLOAD THE GUN

    Now pull the trigger to the rear releasing the hammer AND HOLD THE TRIGGER

    Look between the rear of the cyl between it and the frame. You should be able to see the firing pin where it would have came through the breachface to strike the primer.

    Now looking at the firing pin release the trigger slightly.

    Note the firing pin disappeared.


    Now do the same exercise only this time. Just pull the hammer back 3/4 of the way and let it go without using the trigger. You should never see the firing pin.

    Any "modern" DA revolver will have some form of this passive safety. I carry mine fully stoked
     
  12. tomrkba

    tomrkba Member

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    A "hammer block" is a mechanical device that prevents the firing pin from contacting the primer. If your gun has such a device, then you may carry the gun fully loaded. I believe all models of the S&W 29 and S&W 10 have a hammer block. You can call S&W with the serial numbers and ask a technician.
     
  13. Dlowe167

    Dlowe167 Member

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    I carried a charter arms .44 special bulldog pug for awhile. New ones u dont have to worry about,if finger out of trigger. On snub noses like that. Only problem I could see having in the hammer may catch when pulled out. Id suggest bobbing the hammer. Other than that great idea!
     
  14. HKGuns

    HKGuns Member

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    Thanks even more! I learned something tonight. I did as you suggested RW and you can see the hammer move back as you release the trigger. It is hard to see but you can just barely see the firing pin backing out as well. Thanks a bunch.
     
  15. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    I find that understanding how the safety works goes a long way towards building confidence
     
  16. lloveless

    lloveless Member

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    If your gun has a hammer, to prevent snagging of the hammer when drawing from concealment merely place your thumb over the hammer while drawing for a snag free draw. No need to cut the hammer off.
    ll
     
  17. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    HK

    any quality modern revolver (modern defined as post WWII) could have someone use a mallet, pounding on the hammer, and it not go off. The trigger has to be pulled.

    That is why when you are uncocking a revolver, as soon as the hammer releases, you let the trigger go forward.

    That is why you keep a thumb on the hammer when you are holstering (a shirttail wadded in the trigger can push it back. Holding the hammer prevents that)

    Thumb on the hammer when drawing from a pocket stops snagging.
     
  18. bikemutt
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    bikemutt Member

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    "Thumb on the hammer when drawing from a pocket stops snagging"
    True, when there is an exposed hammer.
     
  19. X-Rap

    X-Rap Member

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    Don't count all SA revolvers in that claim.
    I don't know about all the "modern" SA revolvers but there are quite a few Rugers and Colts out there that might kill you if dropped right. I'm guessing that many of their clones are the same.
     
  20. One_Jackal

    One_Jackal member

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    I think the Op is referring to older single action revolvers. We have moved forward....
     
  21. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    X-rap is right
    being a double action guy I assumed we were talking double actions.

    that and the fact that he said he owned "Two model 29's and a model 10" so I thought he was talking about those.

    Single actions are NOT that which I was speaking of.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2012
  22. JERRY

    JERRY Member

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    the OP mentioned two model 29s and model 10. i think he means S&W revolvers...not S/A guns...
     
  23. David E

    David E Member

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    A cylinder is not a chamber, a chamber is not a cylinder. Using proper terms avoids confusion.

    Yes, as has been mentioned about old design single action revolvers, but the guns you cited are safe to carry fully loaded if they are in good working condition.
     
  24. HKGuns

    HKGuns Member

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    Thanks for your contribution. I think everyone understood the question except you. Don't post if that is the only value you can add.
     
  25. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    DavidE understood quite well and answered the question as well as offered more.

    And, of course, he is right. (he makes a habit of that)
     
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