Savage axis upgrade questions

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Waterboy3313, Nov 27, 2021.

  1. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

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    Sure, I understand what you’re saying and same with what MachIV said. My point is don’t we all know what we’re getting when we buy one? Don’t we all know when buying tools at Harbor Freight that we’re getting something that will work, but it isn’t as nice as a tool that cost 3x? Does anyone not know that a Honda Civic is reliable but it isn’t as nice as a BMW?

    The Axis is an accurate rifle with a street price of about $300. What do people expect? Is anyone really expecting it to be as nice as a $700 Tikka or $1,000 Kimber?
     
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  2. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    I don't think you do.

    I don't see anyone expecting them to be as refined as a $1k gun, either. And that's the point of what is being said; trying to get one there is throwing good money after bad, as with nearly any case of upgrading an economy model in an attempt to make it the luxury/performance version. It's like trying to turn that Civic into the Bimmer.

    You seem to be indignant about people calling the Axis what it is, and you're creating staw men to defend a position that isn't being attacked in the first place. Relax. We all acknowledge that they do the job they were designed to do, no more, no less. That's the exact design parameters of a no-frills economy sporter, and if you're happy with your Axis, fantastic! This thread is not about the performance of a stock rifle, though, which is why we're covering the cost/benefit analysis of upgrades as denoted in the thread title "Savage Axis upgrade questions"
     
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  3. Waterboy3313

    Waterboy3313 Member

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    Here is my take on the whole thing. We can all agree that the trigger can be improved just like 99% of any factory produced gun. So I will spend $20 to make it better. There seems to be a decent amount of after market support for these rifles. Stocks and scopes are all personal preference.

    In my opinion the cool factor of Savage is the fact someone with some basic knowledge and tools can buy a good barrel and swap at home. Even change it from 6.5 creedmoor to a 223 rem if so desired. Not saying it's cost effective but it can be done. I'm the kind of person that likes the fact I don't have to be a gunsmith to do it myself.

    My friend that has a lot of high end stuff bought one Savage rifle. I think it was a 338 Lapua if I remember correctly. He said it was horrible until he replaced the barrel. He also talked to a gunsmith friend that didn't believe him that a his Savage didn't shoot decent.

    I'm not expecting a competition rifle. Like all products that are manufactured sometimes you get a piece of junk. Most times mass produced units are good enough for the average user. Me I'm the average user and some days are better than others.
    For me it will be trigger kit, stock and scope. If I'm not happy I will see about possibly scavenging some parts to turn it into a 223 like I was originally after but only if I can find the parts on budget deal that would make it worth my time. If not down the road she goes. I don't think I will have a problem with it though.
     
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  4. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    Its pretty bloody rare, but it does happen sometimes.


    My only current Savage gun is a 10 ML2 I just got, and havent shot yet, but when accuracy was my primary concern most of my guns were Savages.....and honestly I was never disappointed.
     
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  5. d2wing

    d2wing Member

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    It will make a good gun to play with. It shoots over it's price. Upgrades are cheap. I'd just shoot it first then upgrade as you go.
     
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  6. Waterboy3313

    Waterboy3313 Member

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    I definitely want to shoot it as is. I need something to compare my changes to. I would like to make sure it's on paper and send 10 rounds through it just to see how it does at 100 yards right now. I went to a big box store Saturday morning to see if they had any ammo on the shelf. They were out. I will see if I can find something this week if time allows. I would make a quick range trip after work just to try it out if I can find some.
     
  7. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

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    I’d like to think I could shoot better with a custom or even semi-custom rifle but I think the truth is most rifles leave most rifle owners in the dust. None of the targets below came from rifles that are particularly refined, none fit me perfectly, and all have stock triggers with some home work with zero $ upgrades.

    Try the rifle out, see if you love what it can do, then own it or sell it. I’ll never win BR matches with mine, but what I have works for what I do.


    $169 T/C Compass at 100 yds using a $100 Minox scope
    74AB54CB-746B-4EC2-AB02-ABDF2CBF88F2.jpeg

    $84 Marlin .22lr at 50 yds using a $125 Nikon.
    D484729A-AB22-43D7-A594-6F47D5FA7750.jpeg

    $219 Winchester at 100 yds using a $130 Hawke scope
    8172E21D-D670-4A56-A26A-DBE41A718FCA.jpeg
     
  8. Waterboy3313

    Waterboy3313 Member

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    Good shooting. My thing is honestly I'm not really much into rifle shooting. I prefer my pistols and have fun shooting them at -+ 150 yards. All of my rifles are semi autos and really probably aren't all that accurate. Part of that problem is likely me. I've been wanting a bolt action for a while and one that has decent accuracy. I will most likely be using a bench or table and a rest or bags the majority of the time. I also don't care if it takes me 2 hours to fire 20 rounds. The biggest thing other than having fun is trying to be as accurate as I can. With said I'm not exactly trying to cut playing cards in half at 500 yards but do the best I can and hopefully get better as time goes on.
     
  9. kmw1954

    kmw1954 Member

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    Actually it is about the performance or lack of from a stock rifle. The term Up-Grade by itself lends to the thought that something is lacking in style, performance, reliability, and that doesn't just refer to guns. I can't count the number of computers that I have Up-Graded.

    The Axis I have came with an inexpensive low quality scope so I upgraded the scope. The results were well worth the money spent. I also do not care for the polymer stock on my Axis but I am not going to spend $150.00 for an aftermarket stock for it. It was an entry level rifle that more than met the needs I was looking for, which was and inexpensive rifle chambered in a 223 caliber that would also be inexpensive to shoot. It met both of those criteria. With good ammo and this new scope it will shoot MOA and less @200 yards if I do my part.

    I still shoot it and will keep it on hand even though I shoot my Savage Model 10 223 10X more often. When I bought it, it was my first and only center fire rifle and now I have 3 of them. So there again it has served it's original purpose.
     
  10. Waterboy3313

    Waterboy3313 Member

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    I ended up with the 6.5 creedmoor because it was probably too good to pass up. I originally wanted a 223 and still do for the reasons you mentioned. I have other rifles in 223 so I have ammo on hand as well as components to load more. I have several guns that have never seen factory ammo.

    On top of upgrading this rifle I will also need to upgrade my reloading equipment (dies and case trimmer) plus components. I probably wouldn't mind it so much if it was like it was a few years ago. The more I think about it the less I'm thinking it will probably get used.
     
  11. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

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    Don’t you realize that it’s stupid to upgrade an Axis? It’s like putting lipstick on a pig. We have been reliably informed of this upthread.
     
  12. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

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    I think it makes more sense to upgrade an Axis, if it shoots well, rather than selling it to buy a "nicer" rifle. Selling it usually means taking a loss and then you have no guarantee that the nicer rifle is going to shoot as well. If the nicer rifle doesn't shoot well, then what? Sell that one and take a loss again or start spending money to upgrade the accuracy of a "nice" rifle? Seems to me it's easier and more reliable to upgrade the Axis trigger with the Mcarbo kit and buy a nicer stock than it is to start swapping barrels or making other accuracy upgrades on a rifle that has a nice stock.

    Of course, that also points out another advantage of taking a chance on an Axis. You can only lose so much money. I bought a Ruger Hawkeye in .25-06. It shoots well, but not like my Savage. The real problem is that it is too heavy for my daughter. I bought it NIB for $700. Cabela's offered me less than $300 for it. That $400 loss is more than a new Axis II retails for. You buy an Axis for $300 and you can't lose any more than that.
     
  13. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    The first upgrade any rifle should see imo is a decent bullet. Then you at least know what your working with. Bullets and barrels are the game and everything else is a beauty pageant.
     
  14. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

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    I don’t consider a good scope and rings as an upgrade. They may be better than what’s on there but you’re upgrading a mobile accessory. Detach it and you have a scope ready for any other rifle you own.

    That Winchester of mine gave up its Hawke for a Zeiss, which I gave to dad, before settling on an NOS VX-2 I had never mounted. Apart from a replacement stock (OEM was broken during a hunt) all I’ve spent on the rifle was the cost of bedding compound and a few stock pins.

    Money specific to the rifle is money that cannot be recovered.


    6B26AF11-B81B-46B1-ADDD-A21ABDF82811.jpeg


    0E5B9D84-1EB2-451C-B157-DF8C98B15B76.jpeg
     
  15. illinoisburt

    illinoisburt Member

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    Rather than getting bent into pretzels trying to make an Axis into a wonder-rig, I would stick with very basic items. The trigger kit is cheap and works wonderfully. Best $20 you an put into the gun followed very closely by a $12 Leupold 1-piece slotted base to replace the 2-piece factory mount. The action is long and greatly restricts which optics can be mounted. I will warn you the factory does locktite and torque down those screws so make sure you have a good fitting hex and possibly a little heat (soldering iron is much safer than a torch for small jobs like this).

    I mentioned Boyds stocks since you asked what was available, not necessarily what was needed. The factory stock obviously is functional, but some people who like to shoot from a bench with a bipod while preloading the rifle (pushing forward and down) get inconsistent results due to fore end flex. Might also impact someone using a tight slinged stance. If that's not your style it truly doesn't matter.

    ** 1 small item regarding Axis rifles is light pinstrikes are common due to the 2-piece firing pin spring. Generally they work fine with standard hunting ammo and reloads using match primers. Military primers and ammo labelled or marketed towards semi autos may give you fits with inconsistent misfires. I have not yet seen a satisfactory resolution for this issue.
     
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  16. d2wing

    d2wing Member

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    Yeah I kinda do, maybe you should reread what I said. See if it shoots, then I mean the real cheap upgrades. I had one and am aware of some like reinforcing the stock. Lots of guys buy cheap stuff then try to make it better. I have done that enough to know it's better to start with something better. But if someone gives it to you nothing lost on playing with it. But if you think I am stupid maybe so, lol. Should we take a poll? I am sure you'd have a couple takers. LOL. No hard feelings.
     
  17. borrowedtime69

    borrowedtime69 Member

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    I trimmed the trigger spring to lighten it. Do a little at a time & test it after each cut. I love my .223 rem axis!
     
  18. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

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    I should have added the /sarc tag. I've argued in this thread in favor of the Axis and affordable upgrades. Take a look at my posts upthread. That's also why I wrote "we have been reliably informed upthread."
     
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  19. BobABQ

    BobABQ Member

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    I have found this thread very interesting since I have just bought a Savage Axis XP over the eel end in 6.5 Creedmore. I have yet to shoot it, no ammo available, but I do have some brass and reloading dies on the way. After I get some ammo loaded up I take it to the range. I really bought this rifle on the spur of the moment and I am going to use it as an inexpensive way to try out the cartridge. If it shoots well then I will probably have my Remington rebarreled in 6.5 Creedmore. If this rifle shoots REALLY well then I may spend some money on a new stock. Either way a $20 McCarbo rigger spring kit is on my shopping list. If it is a real dog then down the road it will go. I don’t mind spending money on some upgrades if the rifle REALLY performs well. I look forward to loading up some ammo and taking her to the range. I just need to swap out the inexpensive Bushnell that came with it for the Leupold 6.5-20x40 EFR scope that I have sitting in a drawer. That should let me see what the rifle can do.
     
  20. Waterboy3313

    Waterboy3313 Member

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    So here's a dumb question. This Savage is the only bolt action I own except for a 8mm Mauser k98. I will pretend that one doesn't exist right now for the sake of dumb question. I haven't really had a chance to look over the Savage yet. Now with that being said I've never owned a Remington 700 either. I see a lot of people like the Remington for the most part and a lot of people use the actions on customized and special purpose builds. Keeping that in mind here is the actual question.

    What makes Remington so good to the people that like them so much and what is the real reason why so many people dislike the Savage? Besides the price tag what truly sets them apart?

    About a week ago I shot a buddies 6.5 285 Norma. It was a fairly high end semi custom rifle built using a 700 action. I put about 5 rounds through it. I wasn't really impressed on how it felt. It did shoot good groups at 100 yards but that should be expected in my opinion.
     
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  21. BigBL87

    BigBL87 Member

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    IMO, probably the biggest reason is the 700 is ubiquitous and kind of the standard for modern bolt actions and with that being the case it has a massive aftermarket. Think of it as kind of like the AR-15 of bolt actions in that sense, or kind of like the 10-22 in the rimfire world. The Savage 10/11/12 line has alot of aftermarket support as well, but not quite to the level of the 700. The Axis, with it being very much an entry level rifle, doesn't have quite as much aftermarket.
     
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  22. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

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    I don't own a Remington. My impression is that the primary benefit of a Remington is that a lot of people own Remingtons so there are a lot of aftermarket options for them. In another thread a member, whose name I can't remember, stated that the Remington 700 was the low cost rifle of its time. It was designed to lower manufacturing costs and many people looked down on the 700 for that reason. Kind of like Savage Axis and Ruger Americans.
     
  23. kmw1954

    kmw1954 Member

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    May be wrong but back in history Remington was second fiddle to Winchester until Remington developed the Model 700. They eventually released that model in 3 levels.; ADL, BDL and Classic. As I am told Remington 700 became a hit because of the strength, fit and finish of the entire gun. The ADL was the equivalent of the Axis models in Savage today.
     
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  24. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    I dont claim that this is a factory savage but I shot my first sub moa group with it. Then I did it again another three times in a row. Now comparing a rem 308 to this savage 6br might not be fair, but neither is life.
    20210721_075427.jpg
     
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  25. kmw1954

    kmw1954 Member

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    Alright now tell us more about this non-stock 6BR.

    I am curious because I am looking to barrel my Model 11 action in either a 6BR or 6 ARC.
     
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