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Second Shotgun?

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by lizziedog1, Jan 8, 2012.

?

Second Shotgun Gauge

Poll closed Feb 7, 2012.
  1. 10

    3 vote(s)
    4.8%
  2. 16

    4 vote(s)
    6.5%
  3. 20

    35 vote(s)
    56.5%
  4. 28

    4 vote(s)
    6.5%
  5. 410

    16 vote(s)
    25.8%
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  1. lizziedog1

    lizziedog1 Member

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    Lets say you have a 12 gauge shotgun and you decide to buy a second one in a smaller gauge.

    Would that second one be a 20 or 28 gauge?

    I'd say 28.

    Twenties have loads that approach 12 gauge. Twelves can be downloaded to 20 gauge level. It seems like the 28 would offer something a bit different.

    I guess a 410 could be another choice. But it takes a real expert to be good with one.

    If you were limited to two scatterguns, one being a 12 gauge, what would the second one be?
     
  2. LeonCarr

    LeonCarr Member

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    For me, the second shotgun would be a 12 gauge also.

    Only one MEC loader, no chance of loading smaller gauge ammo into a bigger gauge gun, no chance of getting a quick phone call from a hunting buddy to go shoot doves and running out the door with a 12 gauge shotgun and a vest full of 20 gauge shells (Ask me how I know about that one).

    Just my .02,
    LeonCarr
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2012
  3. wow6599

    wow6599 Member

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    I am a big fan of .410 shotguns. They have almost no recoil, don't tear up game and are just fun to shoot. The downside......the price of .410 shells.
     
  4. gp911

    gp911 Member

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    I hear that comment a lot regarding .410 as an expert's gauge but to those of us who learned on one it's just a smaller gauge, nothing expert about it. It's versatile, light on recoil, and fun to plink with. Consider the skimpy shot strings a challenge, plenty of kids have grown proficient shooting .410s & an experienced adult certainly can enjoy them as well.
     
  5. USAF_Vet

    USAF_Vet Member

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    1st shot gun was a 12g pump. Second shotgun was a 20g single. third shotgun was a .410 single. Next shotgun will be either a 12g or 20g auto.

    The 10, 16 and 28 gauges do not fit into my spectrum of needs, so I doubt I'll ever own one.
     
  6. beatledog7

    beatledog7 Member

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    Shotguns 1-4 are all 12ga. Number 5 will be a 410.
     
  7. RNB65

    RNB65 Member

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    I own several shotguns, all of them 12ga. A Browning Sweet 16 is the only non-12ga shotgun I would even consider buying.
    -
     
  8. 243winxb

    243winxb Member

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    .410 if only one. On the skeet field, the 410 is a hard one to master but fun. 28,20 & 12 break the birds almost the same. For hunting, 12 ga all the way, just pick the length of the chamber.
     
  9. throdgrain

    throdgrain Member

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    I wouldnt consider anything but a 12 bore personally.

    It may well be a different set of circumstances though.
     
  10. SHR970

    SHR970 Member

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    The more important question is what do you intend to do with it? The next one is what type of platform are you considering; pump, O/U, etc. The 20 gauge can do most anything a 12 can and are usually easier on you for a day of field carry. The 410 can frustrate the hell out of you but it can also make you a better wing shot.

    I have guns in 12, 20, and 410; I have the spectrum pretty well covered. Personnaly, I see no need for a 16 or 28 in my battery.
     
  11. bearman49709

    bearman49709 Member

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    I use 16ga for everything I use a shotgun for. I own 4 16's,1 12ga and 1 20ga, the 12 and 20 are for others to use.
     
  12. Virginian

    Virginian Member

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    Well, for me the second one was a 12, then some 20s, then some 10s, then some 28s. Never personally owned a 410.
     
  13. Mauser lover

    Mauser lover Member

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    I would get the 20. It can be loaded down to be effectively a 28, or loaded up to effectively a 12. And it is widely used, so shells are cheap.
     
  14. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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    I'd take a 20 gauge, and a youth model at that, to better fit smaller/younger shooters.
     
  15. pazz

    pazz Member

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    If I already had a 12, I would lean more towards the .410
     
  16. DAP90

    DAP90 Member

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    I voted 20 but it would depend on what the first shotgun was. If it was a tactical model I’d go with another 12 in a field or clays model.

    If it’s already a model that’s suitable for clays and hunting I’d go with a 20.
     
  17. bubba in ca

    bubba in ca Member

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    If it is for HD, and you are happy with 12 ga. and the family members can also handle it, I`d get another 12 ga. in the same make and model. KISS.

    If the above doesn`t apply get a 20 ga. with 2 or3 buck for HD. It has the penetration power to stop somebody at short distances. So does a .410, but in any case you may have to buy these buckshots online. Getting your 20 or .410 in the same make and model as your 12 ga will help keep the learning curve short. Shells are color coded as to gauge.

    28 is an oddball.
     
  18. joed

    joed Member

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    I would only buy a 12 gauge, there just to versatile. I did have a 410 for awhile but the shells cost more then 12 gauge and I found it lacking in the field.

    Friend has a 20 and to me it's just a smaller version of the 12. Sad to see the 16 gauge fade away as I would like to have one.
     
  19. BellyUpFish

    BellyUpFish Member

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    I grew up on a Mossberg 273A .410. Moved up to a Mossberg 500 in 20ga. Picked up a Saiga as my 3rd.

    My next will be a Mossberg 930SPX.
     
  20. Mark8252

    Mark8252 Member

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    Second Shotgun

    My second shotgun was a 20ga. My 6th shotgun was another 410 only this time a pump. I like to use a pump shooting skeet.
     
  21. cbuttre835

    cbuttre835 Member

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    I like uncommon stuff. Just bought a Revelation 16 gauge pump. I voted for 28 gauge as it'll likely be my next shotgun purchase.

    3/4 or 1/2 oz of shot will save $$$ on reloading components. Initial cost is only 80 cents more a box on Win AAs or other name brand shells over 12 ga.

    Everybody has 12s and 20s and .410s. Be different. It's cool.
     
  22. mavracer

    mavracer Member

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    If I was only going to have 2 I'd probably want a pump or auto 12 guage probably a HD/hunting combo with two barrels and an over/under in 12 or 20.
     
  23. lizziedog1

    lizziedog1 Member

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    The 28 does a couple of advantages.

    One, the ammo is easy to carry.

    Second is that I am not a very good wingshooter. I have to shoot early and often at my targets. With a 12, and even a 20, being a little too quick on the trigger could destroy a bird as to render it unfit for consumption.

    On the other hand, an early shot with a 28 leaves you with a bird that isn't too badly damaged.
     
  24. blarby

    blarby Member

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    Nothing beats sporting 4-ball out of a .410

    You will miss. It's very difficult. It is VERY rewarding.
     
  25. IdahoSkies

    IdahoSkies Member

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    An over/under in 20 gauge is a true pleasure. That said a 20 really can do almost everything a 12 can do, so it really depends on your use. If you have a pump 12, an auto loading 12 is a good match for it.
     
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