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Selling Sentimental Guns

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by bad375, Apr 26, 2016.

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  1. bad375

    bad375 Member

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    Curious as to what other peoples thoughts were on selling guns that you don't use but have sentimental value to them. I have several that my dad owned but he passed away 9 years ago. The only ones that might have some value are a couple of Belgium made Browning A-5's in 12ga that were made in the late 50's and mid 60's. The others are relatively inexpensive bolt guns or single shots. I don't shoot them as I have my own is the same calibers. Thoughts???
     
  2. SwaneeSR

    SwaneeSR Member

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    I do not know your family situation. When my dad passed away, there were several guns given to me his only son. These were ones that were special to me for the most part. The others were given to others mostly the grandkids.

    I would not sell them if I had an opportunity to gift them to someone who would appreciate the firearm. They will not bring that much money anyway. I say pass them on if possible.

    Swanee


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  3. C5rider

    C5rider Member

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    for me, I'd say don't confuse monetary value to sentimental value. They ARE different, and don't always follow the same curve.

    If there is definite sentimental value, then selling them is not an option, at any cost. But, there's nothing wrong with passing on any item that was previously owned by a parent/friend or relative if you just don't feel the need to hold onto it any more. No shame in that. Time has a way of changing how we feel about things sometimes.

    Don't feel guilted into keeping something, but be mindful that when it's gone, it's gone. :banghead:
     
  4. bad375

    bad375 Member

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    C5 Rider
    Yeah there are some guns I would never part with, his Ruger #1 in 375H&H will always be with me.
     
  5. J-Bar

    J-Bar Member

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    If there are other shooters in your family, offer the unused/unwanted guns to them before selling them. You may be surprised at who would like to have a memento. You will earn many points for doing so.
     
  6. Ironicaintit

    Ironicaintit Member

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    I agree with these fellas. Precious metal heirlooms can be presented to the next of kin who values and recognizes them, but they should never be sold.

    I have a few from my dad, that were his from his dad, and they will belong to my boy.

    Being a sentimental old fool is great, even though it may not always make financial sense.
     
  7. conrad427

    conrad427 Member

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    Keep em.

    How many stories start with "man, I used to have one of those, wish I still did".

    Or "dad gave me a (fill in the blank), but I sold it, with I still had it"

    If I need the money, McDonald's is hiring.....

    Haha, sentimental old fool, I love it! I am a sentimental YOUNG fool!
     
  8. Panzerschwein

    Panzerschwein member

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    My Dad bought me a Glock 19 when I was stationed in Germany.

    I would rather sell every other gun I owned than to give that one up, even if it is a simple Glock.
     
  9. X-Rap

    X-Rap Member

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    In my family we have guns that are no different than wrenches in a tool box and then we have guns that have family history or those we a building a history with.
    My dad and I are dialed in on what's what and I need to do better keeping my kids up to speed.
    Those select guns become your families firearms oral history.

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
     
  10. ApacheCoTodd

    ApacheCoTodd Member

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    Trying to put my perspective in your shoes...

    ... based solely upon what you have written, I come up with this:

    Regardless of where they came from, if you;

    Do not need the money.
    Do not need the space they take up.
    Do not need to cope with new legal issues like firearms being banned or moving to a banning state or city.

    or
    Do not need to remove them from the house for personal reasons.

    And yet, are considering selling them - they do not in fact have as sentimental hold on you as you may be giving them credit for. Take that for what it's worth in adjusting your parameters. Sounds like maybe it's more a matter of misplaced guilt. Nothing wrong with that, completely natural and a bit admirable.

    For me - in my shoes, I don't even contemplate selling the buncha-few firearms which I hold sentimentally dear. If I needed to sell them, that's a whole other kettle of fish.


    Todd.
     
  11. Onward Allusion

    Onward Allusion Member

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    If the guns hold sentimental value to you then don't sell. If not and you don't use 'em, then sell 'em.
     
  12. Bula

    Bula Member

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    I vote to keep them. If you don't need to sell them, then don't. Not like you have to feed them or pay their rent. My Pops is still kicking arse, but I'd never sell anything he gave me. I have a boy who'll eventually end up with all of them.

    Edit to add: Why not make it a point to shoot them. Sure you may have a .22 single shot, but it wasn't Dad's rifle. Just sayin'
     
  13. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    If you have a whole gob of them then you can probably stand to part with a few. Since they have SOME sentimental value, I agree with others that if possible they should stay in the family. Failing that they stay in the family, pass them on to someone who will cherish it because it came from you.

    I have just such an item, an old beat up wooden baseball bat. When I was a kid, 5 or so years old, Mr. Haley and his wife were in their 70s and had no kids...consequently they had no grandkids. Mr. Haley didn't really take to kids and the neighborhood vandals made a point to pester him. This baseball bat was taken away from a teenager that was beating Mr. Haleys bushes to death, and for years it sat behind his kitchen trashcan for home defense. Mr. Haley took to me for some reason and I helped him in his garden a lot. When Mrs Haley passed, Mr. Haley sent me home with the bat just before signing himself into an assisted living home. The bat is literally worthless, but because it was his, I cherish it. Send these items along to folks you care about, and they will remember you each time they see the gun, or in my case the baseball bat beside my kitchen trashcan.
     
  14. slumlord44

    slumlord44 Member

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    I have a Browning A5 12 gauge and Light 20 that were my dads. The 12 gauge he bought uses and the 20 he bought new. The 20 was his favorite. It goes to his first grandson who was about 3 when dad died. Its spelled out I my will. The 12 I probably will never sell but its possible. It will be sold with the rest of my guns after I'm gone.
     
  15. bad375

    bad375 Member

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    Thanks everyone, I appreciate the input
     
  16. ohihunter2014

    ohihunter2014 Member

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    when I started hunting around 13yo at 16 my brother in law picked up a used revolation 12ga smooth bore with 29inch barrel. the gun was rusty, stock beat up, etc.

    I refinished the stock, fixed the rust, and killed a lot of pheasants, deer, rabbits, and clays with that gun until I was about 20-21yo. I upgraded to a Mossberg 500 with both barrels and scope so he asked for it back for my nephew who really doesn't hunt.

    every morning I pheasant or rabbit hunt I remember that old gun and all the fun we had. I have often thought about offering him a few hundred bucks for it even though its probably not worth $100. that old shotgun meant a lot to me as it was the first I ever somewhat owned.

    don't sell the guns even if they just sit in the safe its the memories that matter.
     
  17. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    I have a few, and I doubt the "need to sell" would ever arise. I'd never make that choice otherwise.

    One is simply my "first handgun" (.357 revolver)

    One is the revolver I bought for BU/OD carry the day I was sworn in (.38 snub.)

    One is the gun my dad carried when he did a stint as a deputy (he and I did not know each other as I was growing up, only re-connecting during the last ten years of his life.), also a .357 revolver.

    One is his other gun, also a BU/OD revolver of the same make/model as mine, though 21 years older.


    These are the ones I can honestly attach sentiment to.
     
  18. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Just because a gun was passed down in the family doesn't automatically mean it had sentimental value. A gun that was actually used by and was a personal favorite of someone in my family would hold quite a bit of sentimental value. Others much less if any at all.

    I have 2 guns owned and used by my grandfathers and great grandfathers that won't be going anywhere except to my grandkids. My dad NEVER purchased a gun. All that he used were passed down to him or were WW-2 trophies that he brought or mailed back from Europe. The 3 prior generations on my dads side of the family simply never owned many guns, and all held sentimental value.

    My grandfather on my mothers side had quite the collection that were passed down to his only son, my uncle. I got a chance to see them about 30 years ago, but will never own any. They were all given to his only son, my cousin who is also now deceased. I have no idea if they are still in the family, but hope so.

    On the other hand I've owned many firearms over the years. I've already given my grown son and daughter 5-6 each and I've mostly kept the ones I actually use. Along with the older guns. Those guns will go to family when I can no longer use them. Most of the guns I have no issues with my kids selling if they need the cash or simply want to change to something they like better. Others really need to stay in the family, mostly those going back several generations. I only have 3-4 guns that I've actually purchased that I'd really like to see stay in the family. The rest are just stuff and most of us already have too much stuff laying around.

    Only you can decide which are just stuff, and which are truly sentimental. It would help if you knew the history behind each of them.
     
  19. BSA1

    BSA1 Member

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    This seems like a pretty good summary of why not too;

    I will add that as I have grown older my shooting interests have changed considerably.
    For example I have a Remington 45-70 Rolling Block I have not shot in quite some time. I have shot long range matches (out to 600 yards) and killed a buffalo at 165 measured yards with it. It is sitting patiently in the back of my safe waiting for me to get interested in it again.

    As I look back I keep kicking myself in the rear for selling some guns and am resolved not to sell any more of them.
     
  20. guyfromohio

    guyfromohio Member

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    I just can't do it. Now, if my dad bought a Glock right before he died, I'd have no reservations about ditching it. However, my grandfather's Winchester 75 Target and Wingmaster can never be sold. Also, the Wingmaster that I got for Christmas when I was 16 will remain with me.
     
  21. Browning Guy

    Browning Guy Member

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    I ran into the same situation in my family. My brothers and I have several guns that belonged to my dad over the years. Before he died he gave me and 2 brothers guns that had a lot of value to HIM. I got the old 1917 Enfield 30/06 he had "demilitarized and customized" for him back in the 60's (I can hear the screams of anguish but hey, It was a different market in the 60's than now). That rifle WILL NOT be sold. Both my brothers and my nephews say that IT stays with a family member regardless. I also have his old Remington .22. It doesn't hold the sentimental value the other guns do and I considered selling it. Then I gave it a good cleaning and went to the range with it. That old rascal can flat out SHOOT! It is a typical Remington bolt action, tube fed, 22 with a fixed 4 power K-mart scope that he bought used, and set up probably in the early 70's. I started to let it go when I finally decided not to. I have a great shooter that is really "retro" in setup that did belong to him so I think it will stay. It has started to develop feed problems after a "gazillion" rounds so I will probably semi retire it as a main rifle but still keep it around and take it to the range on a regular basis, maybe a trip to the squirrel woods each fall. The little cash I get from it will be gone in no time but it is a link to my history that couldn't be replaced. And I love it when I can out shoot the kids with their latest "whiz-bang let the lead fly" rifles with my "old timer"! :neener:
     
  22. Coyote3855

    Coyote3855 Member

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    I will pass my Dad's guns to my son. He already has the Highway Patrolman and the Winchester 21. He'll get the Colt Woodsman and the .25-35 Model 1894 soon. He may sell them, I don't care. But I won't.
     
  23. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    My grandfather gave me a Remington Nylon 66 that he bought for shooting crows. I do not intend to trade or sell it, ever. He also gave me a pellet gun that his coworkers bought him as a retirement gift in 1979. I don't intend to ever sell that one either, and I am more attached to it than the Remington.

    When he died, and we had to sell his house, my dad inherited the proceeds. He gave myself, and my two siblings a small inheritance as a gift, that was under the taxable limit. I paid off my student loan with it, stuck 30% in the bank for a down payment on a house, and the rest I used to buy a S&W Regulation Police (3rd Model Hand Ejector), because he would have liked it, and the patent date on the grip happens to be the day he was born. I have no intention of selling that one either.

    I think the only way I would ever part with the revolver or the Remington is if I was trading them towards a different gun, as I would still associate the new gun with my grandfather. Sort of an inheritance transformation.

    I would never just sell them for cash, unless I had a major financial crisis where life saving surgeries were needed.

    On that note, I have thought about selling other gifts in order to fund new gun acquisitions.
     
  24. Schwing

    Schwing Member

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    My Dad bought an old Mossberg 26b .22 when he was in High school. It was the first rifle I hunted with as a kid. I left home and for nearly 3 decades, it sat in the rafters in the basement collecting dust and the front sight got smashed.

    It shoots well but isn't a tack driver but, when I found it, I spent many times the gun's value restoring it and would not part for it for anything. I doubt it is worth more than $150 at most but the sentimental value makes it priceless to me.
     
  25. rugerman

    rugerman Member

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    Last summer I sold a bunch of guns, some were my Dads, some were my son's ( he died in 2009) and some were mine ( I sold them because I no longer hunt-arthritis, both RA & OA and end stage kidney disease) and if I died I didn't want my wife to have to deal with having to sell a bunch of guns that she had no idea of what they were worth. One other son, he didn't want them, no grand kids or other family members who I would give them to. Gave one to a good friend, gave a couple to my sister. Sure they brought back memories, but I can remember without with having the physical gun. Didn't need the money,put it away for a rainy day. Still have around 20 figured I would sell a few more this year. My wife kept my Ruger red label 20 gauge for a house shotgun ( simple, only have to move it off safe and point and pull the trigger) and we still have several guns hidden around the house if we need something to repel boarders, we both carry when we leave the house so those needs are also well covered.
     
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