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Shooting the Spirit Moose

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Black Butte, Oct 9, 2013.

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  1. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    Regardless of superstion or color or whatever, the critter is gonna be wormfood in a few years. Seems to me that the argument is over who gets to immortalize the animal and how.

    So you shoot an unusual critter and have it mounted or the hide made into a rug or whatever: That's as close to immortality as any wild animal ever gets.
     
  2. Outlaw Man

    Outlaw Man Member

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    I understand trying to convey a positive image for hunters, but let's be honest. You're going to hack off a few people regardless of what you do. If you're that concerned about what radical groups think about you, either don't hunt or, like Sam said, at least keep your mouth shut about it.

    As far as the natives who are upset about this particular instance (I'm not lumping them in with the radical groups I mentioned), it's a tough situation. The hunters have offered to try to make up for it, and if it was that big a deal you should have put it in a zoo or wildlife reserve.
     
  3. Paul7

    Paul7 Member

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    If the Indians don't like it then they should campaign to change the game laws. Their ideas aren't more important than the rest of us.
     
  4. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    Since this happened in Nova Scotia and not India, it was the indigenous Mi'kmaq people that were upset, not Indians.....:rolleyes:

    Remember my first post in this thread about the shooting of an albino deer? It was legal game because it was in a CWD zone. The state now proposes to make albinos in CWD zones a protected species just like they are in the rest of the state. This proposal has nuttin' to do with biology or game management, but solely because of the negative perception of shooting a rare animal. We as hunters in the lower 48 are a minority. We are allowed to hunt only because the majority of folks that do not hunt allow us to. Most of the hunting opportunities we have lost in the last few years other than habitat loss and lack of game has to do with negative perceptions of hunters by that majority. Most all of us that have hunted for more than a few years have lost a good hunting spot because of the actions of another irresponsible hunter. What they did may have been legal, but it upset the landowner to the point that they no longer allow hunting on their property. The attitude that whatever is legal goes and the perception of others of us does not impact us is foolishness. While it's legal to drive around for weeks with a dead deer on top your car, does it give any of us a positive image? While it's legal to wound game, lose it to coyotes and then brag about it in the bar, does it make us look responsible and ethical? In the home town where I grew up, a local KOA campground fed the local deer. They started feeding a small nubbin' buck one year and four years later he was a true trophy. Every one in town knew him and he would come up to folks that called his name. Local dirtball had permission to hunt the farm next to the campground. Lured "bucky" across the fence and then shot him @ point blank range with his bow while patrons of the campground watched. Perfectly legal. Did nuttin' but harm to the image of the rest of us local hunters. Ended up closing many spots to us in the area because of his negative actions. His greed and desire to have a "wall-hanger" meant more than ethics and the future of hunting and it impacted more folks than just him.

    I think the hunters that killed the "Spirit Moose" did not know the impact that shooting it would have. I also think they are truly saddened by their actions and are doing whatever they can to make up for it. Kudos for them. Ethics is not always just doin' what is legal. It's doing the "right" thing when no one else is around.
     
  5. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    Albinos are inferior animals. Vision problems galore. Wisconsin is nuts to protect them, especially CWD deer. Your DNR should be commited.
     
  6. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    As I said, the decision to protect them has nuttin' to do with biology or game management. But folks enjoy seein' them and get upset when they're shot. There actually is a pretty good size herd of them in the Boulder Junction area that has had national attention. They bring in tourists from all over the world. Seems they're worth more to the folks up there alive than dead. Wisconsin's DNR does just fine. Look at the amount of trophy bucks, the amount of deer taken and the numerous opportunities to hunt deer in the state. Then compare that to your state, or virtually any other state in the Union. We really don't need to shoot of the white deer. We can't even shoot off all the brown deer than need to be controlled. If allowin' a few white deer to live makes folks happy and easier to get along with, and gives us sportsmen a positive image to those folks, in the majority, that don't hunt......so be it.

    Ghost Deer of Boulder Junction

    the-albino-buck.jpg
     
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