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Shooting with Accuracy 101

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Paper_Zombie, Feb 12, 2013.

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  1. danweasel

    danweasel Member

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    Ok, well it sure can't hurt to learn the fundamentals and THEN shoot until you are arse deep in brass!

    .22 is the ticket.

    -Dan
     
  2. Warp

    Warp Member

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    .22lr is the ticket for 99% of us.
     
  3. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

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    Fun sayings aside, I find few people wanting or willing to devote 4 hour blocks of time to range work. On a personal level it is my feeling that is far too much time both physically and mentally to sustain. Once a peak has been reached there will be a decline indicating a good stopping point, sooner for new shooter so as to keep things enjoyable. If it isn't fun then it's work.

    My last suggestion, vary the targets. Interactive targets provide both instant feedback and gratification to newer shooters be it a swinging steel plate or a simple balloon tacked to the backstop.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2013
  4. Furncliff

    Furncliff Member

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    I thought I knew what accuracy meant until I bought a really good .22. I have learned a lot since and my efforts are more generously rewarded.

    A Cooper or Anni is great, but a CZ or Brno will work too.
     
  5. Nwflycaster

    Nwflycaster Member

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    What discipline does this student want to get into? Is said student a young person?

    My shooting career started with a pellet rifle in the backyard. Then I moved into a junior indoor 4 position program (most rangess have something like this). I couldn't recommend anything higher than one of these programs. They will teach the proper fundamentals for precision shooting. As I said this is how I started, I never shot any longer range stuff or larger caliber than my .22 rf for years other than my hunting rifles to check that I was sighted in and to hunt.
    My first introduction into longer range stuff was a year and a half ago. I have been shooting midrange prone matches and highpower across the course matches as well and have never fired anything but high master scores. I attribute this 100% to the smallbore shooting I have done most of my life.
    When you want to practice, do so dry-firing at home, or with an air rifle at home. Anytime you spend time behind your rifle practing sound fundamentals will help. You don't have to go and shoot 200, 300, 600 or even 1000 yards to improve your shooting. But you will need to do those things to learn how to read the wind, that is another lesson all in itself.

    All of the best shooters I know personally, come from a smallbore position shooting background.

    And one more thing that the young shooters enjoy about an NRA smallbore program is that there are awards they can earn along the way to keep them motivated to keep improving. By the time they get their Distinguished Expert badge they are becoming quite an accomplished young shooter.
    At my local club's program the shooters get about 45 minutes of shooting time each week plus monthly matches where they can compete against other clubs as well, shooting against kids of the same ability class, and have some fun.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2013
  6. Ramone

    Ramone Member

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    as regards 'shooting till you are in pile of brass'...

    While everyone is different, I find many (myself included) make more progress in a few shorter (less than 2 hour) range trips than a longer one.
     
  7. jungle

    jungle Member

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    Position and paper shooting is great, but a field shot must practice many non-standard positions and develop a fairly rapid technique to be effective.

    Always use any available rest and understand what you and your rifle are really capable of off the range. There is a big difference.

    Any careful shot under any conditions helps to develop skill that transfers to all other shots.

    I agree with niho on this, being a good shot is much more than just visiting a range and drilling paper at a known distance in the same conditions time after time.
     
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