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Shooting with Delta Force

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics and Training' started by MudPuppy, Jan 17, 2015.

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  1. Nom de Forum

    Nom de Forum Member

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    That was some of what I saw. The number of students going through JFK really increased. Very inexperienced soldiers were being accepted to the Q course. There was also the increase to three Ranger Battalions. In SF groups you saw not only non-SF qualified soldiers wearing the Green Beret they also got rid of the candy stripe. By the mid-80s I also saw an increase in the new toys available. Things like the issue of brown gore-tex boots that resembled jungle boots (only a trial), the new gortex parka and pants (adopted), and more new weapons. Their was realization of a need for a specialized SF sniper school (SOTIC) that taught more than the conventional sniping techniques of infantry units. Larry Freeman (R.I.P.), former Delta operative, was instrumental in getting SOTIC up and running before promotion to SGM and going to A.S.D. At SOTIC the M21 was being supplemented with modified Rem 700s with McMillan stocks, and .338 Lapua (at that time referred to as .338-.416) and .50 BMG rifles were being tested. It was a time of great transition.
     
  2. MudPuppy

    MudPuppy Member

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    By the mid 80s though, everyone was getting new toys--I assume the byproduct of Reagan?

    I think my infantry unit used some of the first '249s on the recently cleared range, the bradleys, abrams, the A2s, Kevlar, M9s, UH-60s, those new boots, humvees, etc.

    When I got to Warrior Base in KR, we were still using M60s (gpmg and tank), 151s, and 1911s. The only new stuff we had was the Kevlars. (I think only USMC and 82nd had the A2s when I arrived to my first duty posting.)

    I can't remember when I first heard the whispers of Team 6 or the Delta guys--getting very old...
     
  3. RustyShackelford

    RustyShackelford member

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    Tom Clancy....

    If you really, really want to know the in depth history or background of US military special operations & SF forces(18 series), read Tom Clancy's Special Forces and Special Operations. These non fiction books go into every speck of detail.
    Beckwith's non fiction: Delta Force & Eric Haney(US Army, CSM/E9 retired) Inside The Delta Force are good too.

    Rusty
     
  4. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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    Haven't read Clancy's nonfiction stuff, so can't comment there.

    Beckwith and Haney's books are autobiographical. That's probably all I need to say there.

    IMHO Al Paddock's US Army Special Warfare: Its Origins (http://www.amazon.com/U-S-Army-Special-Warfare-Origins/dp/0700611770) is the best starting point for a serious study. There are LOTS of books on special operations and the units involved in them, and I haven't read them all (though that was my job for 13 years, a good while back). There's no doubt some good stuff out there I haven't seen.
     
  5. RustyShackelford

    RustyShackelford member

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    New breed....

    There are many new special ops & military books out there now.
    A new book I want to read soon is Level Zero Heroes it's an account of military operations in SW Asia by the new MARSOC or Marine Raiders.
    This elite tier one unit is the USMC special ops command. They are fairly new compared to SWCC, ParaRescue & SEALs.

    I also saw a non fiction book called Guardian Angel about real USAF ParaRescue & CSAR/CRO guys. They are serious hard chargers. :eek:
    Like many SOF units they've expanded but the field is still one of the toughest to make all the way thru.
    As a teen in the late 1980s, I read a article about how for nearly five years no airmen or NCOs could pass all the rigid standards of ParaRescue.
     
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