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Should I buy it? Inland M1A1 paratrooper.

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by grampajack, Sep 26, 2016.

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  1. grampajack

    grampajack AR Junkie

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    I've always wanted one of these, and this is the first one I've seen local. It's an Inland, and the guy says it's in excellent condition. The leather piece on the stock looks kind of rough, but I can live with that if the price is right. What do you guys think?

    Update: Case closed; it's a fake. Thanks to everyone for their help:)
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2016
  2. ilbob

    ilbob Member

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    Like anything else, if you want it and the price is right, buy it.
     
  3. grampajack

    grampajack AR Junkie

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    That's what I'm trying to find out.:)
     
  4. Flynt

    Flynt Member

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    It depends. If you're looking for a collector's item, better bone up on what is correct for that gun. If the gun is indeed correct, that's probably a decent price. If you just want a nice shooter, you can get any old M1 carbine and a repro folding stock for a lot less.
     
  5. swede4198

    swede4198 Member

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    You need to do a lot of research on this gun as most carbines went through arsenal rebuilds where parts were mixed between different guns. There are a lot of repro parts out there, especially paratroop stocks which were hard to find. There are sites which can give you what parts should be on a paratrooper and the correct marking for each part.

    If you want a shooter you can get a used commercial M1 and put a new stock on it or you can buy a new Inland paratrooper as they are now in production but not related to the old Inland.
     
  6. grampajack

    grampajack AR Junkie

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    I'm wanting a collector, not a shooter. Obviously I can't tell much from the photos, but the guy claims all the serial numbers match, and the stock definitely looks old enough.

    So if everything is as he says it is, how is the price?
     
  7. Flynt

    Flynt Member

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    OK, a collector's item... I agree with Swede's comment. You need to do a lot of research to make sure you don't get taken for a ride. I have a couple of reference books on M1 carbines, and I'm not really a collector. I'm not an expert, but I'm concerned about the "matching serial numbers" description. I'm not aware of any matching serial numbers, but carbine parts were usually marked to indicate the manufacturer, and many parts were upgraded or otherwise swapped out over time.
     
  8. Jackal

    Jackal Member

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    I've seen a lot of older repro para stocks that looked real...
     
  9. Redlg155

    Redlg155 Member

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    since it is local I would insist on a 3 day non firing inspection period. Find a subject matter expert to examine the rifle and get it appraised.
     
  10. grampajack

    grampajack AR Junkie

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    redacted
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2016
  11. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Serial numbers between 5,150,000 & 6,700,000 fall into the right range, but remember any M1 in that range could have been dropped into a para stock. Stock markings will be important.
     
  12. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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  13. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    grampajack

    Have to agree with everyone here who say you really should practice due diligence when looking for an original Inland M1A1 Carbine. Lots of fakes out there and for that kind of money you want to be sure you're getting the real deal. If you can try to get a hold of Bruce Canfield's book, "Complete Guide to the M1 Garand and the M1 Carbine". You can find it on Amazon for around $30.
     
  14. grampajack

    grampajack AR Junkie

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    redacted
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2016
  15. JT-AR-MG42

    JT-AR-MG42 Member

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    What serial numbers are matching on a M1A1 carbine?

    JT
     
  16. ulflyer

    ulflyer Member

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    I've owned two original M1A1s, plus I have bought and sold over 30 M1 carbines. I don't like the look of that one and the price is too cheap for an original. Something stinks about it, especially the flash hider and leather sling. That gun has been duded up, I guarantee you, by someone who didn't know what they were doing; unless I had it in my hand and could examine every single part in detail, I'd let it go. Sorry to be bearer of bad news as its obvious you want it.
     
  17. grampajack

    grampajack AR Junkie

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    Yea, the sling is absolutely incorrect, that's for sure. And even if the flash hider is from the period, I highly doubt it's original to the gun. But that could be removed easily enough. It's the stock that bothers me. It just looks new. There's no patina on it. I'll tell you people, making counterfeit antiques should be illegal unless they're clearly marked as reproduction. All this "historically accurate" repro crap is really taking the fun out of collecting milsurps.
     
  18. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    grampajack

    For years my brother looked for an original M1A1 to add to his U.S. militaria collection. After examining so many reputed "genuine G.I. issue M1A1 Carbines" he finally gave up. Way too many fakes out there. He is quite happy with the mint condition Standard Products M1 Carbine that I did find for him a number of years ago.
     
  19. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    Stock looks rusted in the picture. That'll drop its collector value.
    Have a look here. http://www.uscarbinecal30.com/modelM1A1.html
    I think the flash hider was used on M3's and not M1A1's. Wouldn't be a deal breaker though. Neither is the wrong sling. Both come off easily.
    Not entirely convinced the bayonet lug is right either. Isn't a deal breaker either though.
    There was a supposedly original M1A1 on Gunauction.com that sold for $5,376.65, in 2006, so I'm kind of suspicious.
     
  20. Tommygunn

    Tommygunn Member

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    The flash hider clamps on to the barrel, which is not obvious from this photo. I have one for my carbine, though I've never used it with the hider on.
     
  21. bainter1212

    bainter1212 Member

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    The "serial #s matching" would have me suspicious right away.

    M1 carbines only have the serial number stamped on the receiver and nowhere else.
     
  22. grampajack

    grampajack AR Junkie

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    It had my BS meter going off the charts, but I so wanted it to be real! Looks like you guys have some very good reasons to support my suspicions. The guys on the M1 forum also confirmed that the stock looks all wrong.

    BTW, when I asked the seller about the "matching" numbers, he dodged the question, twice if I recall our exchange. Seems like he knows he has something to hide.
     
  23. Nature Boy

    Nature Boy Member

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    Makes it easier to match :)

    I've always wanted one of these, but never been educated enough to feel comfortable about taking the leap.
     
  24. grampajack

    grampajack AR Junkie

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    I told the guy I was no longer interested. He claims he sold it last night. I have a feeling someone got took. Oh well, I guess he should have done his homework. But I still get the feeling this guy knew he was selling a fake, as he was extremely evasive about the "matching numbers" which I asked him about twice, and both times he simply ignored the question. Armslist is badly in need of moderators. It's a great place to find and get rid of stuff, but it's like the wild west in that place.
     
  25. Ibmikey

    Ibmikey Member

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    Hey Jack, what "matching" numbers are you talking about? A Carbine was serialized on the receiver only, or are you referring to a part on the weapon that has a drawing number to identify it? The drawing number often can show the time frame in which it was used. Such as: hammer made by X has drawing number 123 which was used until June 43 and replaced with drawing number 456.
    This question was asked several times but an answer never given.
     
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