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Should I sell my sks?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by rduchateau2954, Dec 31, 2011.

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  1. rduchateau2954

    rduchateau2954 Member

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    For the first time in my life the thought of selling one of my firearms, my sks. I don't shoot it, it's just a cheap chinese model, and I really don't care for the way it looks. I took it out the other day, shot about 20 rounds through it and moved on to another gun.

    The thing is, I inherited this gun from my father. I took my second deer with this rifle which was my first one shot drop. I have a lot of memories with this rifle, but it was always a love/hate relationship. My dad didn't buy it because he wanted an SKS. He went to a gun store looking for a dirt cheap rifle that could kill a deer in the swamps of the wisconsin northwoods and the sks was what he ended up with.

    I tell myself that with a new stock, trigger job and some sort of scout optic would make it into a shooter, but no amount of money will ever make it outshoot my tikka.

    From a little bit of time on gunbroker, it seems like $200-$250 is the going rate for my sks. I would have to put the money towards something else. I would have to have something to show for it. It would be a chunk towards a first handgun or reloading setup.

    Advise?
     
  2. Saakee

    Saakee Member

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    Do you have a family member that could use it? It sounds like it has enough sentimental value you might want to pass it on or just safe it for now until you're quite sure you don't want it.
     
  3. leadcounsel

    leadcounsel member

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    No. It's not meant to be a tack driver.

    They are reliable battle rifles that shoot a versatile caliber.

    Keep it if for no other reason sentimental value.
     
  4. mgmorden

    mgmorden Member

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    For yours I'd keep it for sentimental value. Otherwise, I'm not fond of the SKS. I had a Yugo model for several years (bought it back in the day for $89). Never shot it. It was not that accurate more what was worse was the thing was insanely heavy. I ended up selling it a few months ago for a little over $200.

    Overall, I think there are better guns out there for the money that they now cost.
     
  5. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

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    I don't sell guns anymore.

    A lot of us would say that it's good to have a brutally rugged rifle that goes bang every time with really cheap ammo. Does it really take that much space?
     
  6. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    Plenty of folks like SKSs, and would be perfectly happy to pay you the going rate for yours. If your Dad didn't care for it, and you don't care for it, I don't see much sentimental value there.

    They're great little rifles for what they are, but if you don't have a need or a fondness for what they are, why sweat it? If your heart is set that the value of a firearm is in whether or not it can out-shoot your Tikka bolt gun, then you'd be better off and happier with high end bolt rifles or AR-15s.

    Do not fall into the trap of mucking around with it, adding optic mounts and stocks and whatnot. That won't make it what you like in a rifle and it will only hurt the value when you finally get around to selling it.
     
  7. btg3

    btg3 Member

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    The typical advice on THR is when in doubt, keep it until you are sure you will have no regrets.

    However, you may have excellent reason to get a sidearm for in the field, or a concealed handgun now that WI has legalized concealed carry.

    Whether you intend to pursue a handgun or a relaoding setup, $250 is roughly half way there. So I suggest that you hold on to the SKS until:
    1. You have decided what you want to buy.
    2. You have saved the difference for that purchase.

    Selling the SKS need not be the first step in your plan -- assuming you have one.
     
  8. rduchateau2954

    rduchateau2954 Member

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    Thanks for the quick responses. Right now, it is in a gun sock in the closest because I don't have room for it, but it's not alone. When I want to go shoot cheaply I grab my marlin 60.

    It's not that my father didn't care for the rifle, it was just a cheap tool that he got to do a job until he could get a better tool. He just never got the chance.

    I do agree with you guys about not selling guns. It's not like it's worth a whole lot.

    Like I said, it has never crossed my mind before, but the sks is fast approaching "safe queen" or in this case; "closet queen" and I don't like the thought of that.

    Thanks for the advise, I will hang onto it for a couple more weeks at least and look into it's possible replacements.

    I have been going back and forth with myself all week about this.


    Edit: Saakee, I do not have any family members who could use it. My two sisters have no use for it, and I don't speak with my dads family anymore.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2011
  9. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    The choice is ultimately yours. My dad didn't have many guns and what he did own were not quality nor valuable. Non the less I could never bring myself to sell any of them. To me, $200 is worth more in memories than it is towards another gun.
     
  10. USAF_Vet

    USAF_Vet Member

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    I have no qualms with selling guns I don't shoot or have little use for. Personally, I love the SKS and can't wait to pick mine up from layaway. In your case, it doesn't seem like a whole lot of sentimental value, which is the only reason I'd ever keep a gun I don't shoot, like my Arisaka.

    If you've got a Tikka, the SKS will never out perform. It does take a bit of money to make the SKS into something you want, since it seems like you don't like it as is in it's factory configuration. I'm the same way, as a chronic tinkerer, a bone stock SKS would bore me, too. Mine, however, already comes equipped with a side folding polymer stock, magazine conversion, and receiver mounted optic rail and a cheap 4x25 optic I'll end up changing. It's set up the way I want it, with enough meat on the bone to change out the stock upper handguard for some tacticool railed thingie and add a vertical forward grip.

    But it'll be a shooter, something I will rely on for a multi-purpose rifle. Since you have no such need for your SKS, I'd sell it.
     
  11. slowr1der

    slowr1der Member

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    For me even if I never shot it and didn't like it, I wouldn't be able to sell it. The memories and the fact that your father had it would be worth more than the $250 you might get for it if it was me. To me I'd rather just keep it and have it sit there and be able to use it if I wanted to. That said, I know not everyone feels this way.
     
  12. rduchateau2954

    rduchateau2954 Member

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    You guys are echoing the thoughts in my head.

    $250 isn't much for a rifle with memories, and I am not hurting for money, but it would be $250 towards something else.

    As far as the rifle itself goes, I wouldn't want a tacticool version, but its just such a cheap stock that there is no amount of chemical or process that would ever make it nice. If it's gonna be a non shooter, I want rich wood grain.

    Any plans for it would be a nice wood stock, m1 style peep sights, the firing pin spring mod, and a trigger job. Everything but the trigger would have been completely reverse able if I sell it later.
     
  13. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Member

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    If you sell it it's gone and there no getting it back. If you don't sell it you can always go back and sell it later if it absolutely has to be gone.

    It's not costing you a dime to keep it.
     
  14. USAF_Vet

    USAF_Vet Member

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    To me, throwing money at a gun you're not sure if you even want to keep is the wrong way to go at it. Sure, a new stock, new sights, etc. would make it into a better shooter, and are all reversable if you decide to sell it down the road, but then you're stuck with all the parts and a stock for a gun that you now don't even have. If you are even considering selling it, I think buying parts and mods for it is a bad idea, since you'll never recoup your money from those.

    $250 isn't much, that's true. If it has some sentimental value, pull the firing pin and hang it on the wall. Or let it sit in the closet for awhile longer until you make up your mind. Either way, a gun in the closet that doesn't get shot much isn't hurting anything. but if you have plans on what to do with the money it will garner in a sale, think about your priorities. Still, an SKS in the closet isn't a bad HD option, either, depending on what else you have to serve that role.
     
  15. rduchateau2954

    rduchateau2954 Member

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    I won't be doing any mods to it, that is just what I would do IF I ever did anything to it.

    With it stuck in the closet the way it is, should I use a sock, soft case, or hard case? I have in a sock now because I figured it breathed better. The house is dry in the winter.
     
  16. Wanderling

    Wanderling Member

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    $250 is not a whole lot. I'd refinish the stock really nice, and keep it. Once you have kids, give it to them.
     
  17. wannabeagunsmith

    wannabeagunsmith Member

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  18. Dr.Mall Ninja

    Dr.Mall Ninja Member

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    My new rule is.... when in doubt do not sell.
     
  19. USAF_Vet

    USAF_Vet Member

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    Ok, I get it. That makes sense then.


    I like using gun socks that have the silicon impregnated fabric. For long term storage outside of a safe or gun cabinet, that sock is probably your best option. I don't like storing guns long term in soft or hard cases, I've had rust issues with them, even if they go in well oiled.
     
  20. rduchateau2954

    rduchateau2954 Member

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    There is a thought, I have an old winchester 77 that I want to refinish. The sks would make a good guinea pig. I can't make it any worse.



    I'll just keep it in it's sock then and make sure it gets cleaned on the regular. Like Trunk Monkey said, it's not costing me anything to keep.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2011
  21. leadcounsel

    leadcounsel member

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    Or, hold onto it until another gun law scare, then double your money! Seems there's one every decade...
     
  22. Ben86

    Ben86 Member

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    I think you should sell it and get an AK-47. Thank me later. WASR 10/63s are great.
     
  23. parsimonious_instead

    parsimonious_instead Member

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    I've felt this way for a while, and it's somewhat backed up by sentiments expressed by a lot of the guys in my shooting club:
    "You rarely regret the acquisition of a gun, but nearly always regret letting one go."
     
  24. ShawnC

    ShawnC Member

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    I sold my SKS a few years ago and regret it to this day. It didn't have any sentimental value, I just liked it but needed the money.
    But if you have no attachment to it, you should sell yours. If you are afraid you will miss it, replace it with something nicer immediately. Should take the sting out of it.
     
  25. lobo9er

    lobo9er Member

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    I tried to "trick out" my sks. It went back to plain wood stock in a few weeks. I bought the tapco digital tan stock. Looked alright but really I thought it sucked. Bought a couple chinese 20 round mags, they never fed perfect. So in the end its still one of my favorite guns, but it is what it is. with out all the garbage that I put on it it is rock solid, dependable.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2011
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