Should It Be the 5 Safety Rules?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Plan2Live, Jan 7, 2015.

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  1. Plan2Live

    Plan2Live Member

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    Accidental shootings, especially those involving children in any way are getting a lot of attention these days and deservingly so. We talk a lot about the Four Cardinal Safety Rules. I wonder if Jeff Cooper were writing those rules today if he wouldn't have included a fifth rule. Something like; Rule #5 - Always restrict children and other persons from accessing your firearms without proper supervision.

    In the past I have always stressed this point after I teach someone the four safety rules but going forward I think I will just throw #5 in like it's always been there.

    Comments?
     
  2. rondog

    rondog Member

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    One could probably write a whole booklet of firearm safety rules. But I think the four basic rules are the most important, and four is a simple number to teach and learn, easy for kids to grasp and memorize.
     
  3. splithoof

    splithoof Member

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    I usually throw in a few extra points as well when teaching those new to the world of firearms.
    However, there is no such thing as an "accidental discharge"; only negligent. If it was the result of a child accessing a firearm, it is negligence on the person who owns the firearm.
     
  4. Frank Ettin

    Frank Ettin Moderator Staff Member

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    Probably not.

    The Cooper/Gunsite Four Rules were formulated to describe, in simple, easily remembered terms, the proper mindset for safe gun handling. Those Four Rules grew up on a hot range where it is customary to indeed go about with one's gun(s) loaded and where people are trained who will indeed be going around with loaded guns out in the world and about their normal business.

    Beyond those Four Rules for safe gun handling, there can be a long list of additional rules for being safe with guns. Those could include making sure you're using the correct ammunition, secure your gun from unauthorized access, be sure your gun is in good repair, be sure that there are no obstructions in the barrel, etc.

    But the Four Rules as they are serve their purpose, and have served their purpose well for a lot of years.
     
  5. alexander45

    alexander45 Member

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    We could go kiss and make it one rule "don't be stupid with potentially dangerous items"
     
  6. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    Actually, I subscribe to one:

    Don't pull the trigger, or allow it to be pulled, when doing so could be bad.

    (The "four" work well to reduce the number of scenarios in which "doing so would be bad". They are great for teaching new firearms handlers but, once proficiency is achieved, can be reduced to just that one.)
     
  7. Mainsail

    Mainsail Member

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    The first thing that popped into my mind when I read the OP.

    It's somewhat disturbing that it even needs to be mentioned. If one doesn't even understand how the four rules apply, how could they possibly employ them effectively? :(
     
  8. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    Years ago, we used to actually teach ten rules in hunter safety. There are several places where you find them still in use. The NSSF uses a list of ten. If folks would stick to the basic four, the other 6 are really not needed. As for keeping guns away from children, that should be on the parenting rules list.
     
  9. cambeul41

    cambeul41 Member

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  10. mokin

    mokin Member

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    Referring to post number eight....

    I had to memorize ten rules for the Hunter Safety Course I took back in the day (1978). At the time it seemed to me that some of those rules applied to gun ownership, carrying a gun in the field, and when it comes time to press the trigger. There are a lot of rules out there already. Most of them apply to different aspect of firearm ownership and use.
     
  11. ford8nr

    ford8nr Member

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    If I were to ascribe to one it would
    KEEP THE MUZZLE POINTED IN A SAFE DIRECTION.
    No matter what happens at that point no one is hurt.
     
  12. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    The four rules are for you using the gun.

    Keeping guns in a safe place is something else. When children shoot someone accidentally, an adult failed to do this.
     
  13. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    ford8nr writes:

    In self-defense cases, it may actually be necessary to point a firearm in a direction that is unsafe for at least someone.

    I agree that that concept relates to my one rule as well (Don't pull the trigger, or allow it to be pulled, when doing so would be bad.), as it could be "bad" for an individual who needs being shot to stop an attack.
     
  14. Frank Ettin

    Frank Ettin Moderator Staff Member

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    Which is why in the Cooper/Gunsite rules Rule Two is stated, "Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy."
     
  15. gunsablazin

    gunsablazin Member

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    Yeah, and Rule #2 is my argument against the now popular "appendix carry", sure it's fast, but also allows for the possibility of destroying something you might want to use later...... ouch!
     
  16. Zach S

    Zach S Member

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    I never considered rule two to apply to holstered, slung, racked, or cased firearms.
     
  17. Sheepdog1968

    Sheepdog1968 Member

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    I will say no. The more rules you have the more it dilutes the importance of any one of them. Loui Awerbuck did add one and it had to do with cell phones and not having ones nose buried in it.
     
  18. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    Me, neither. Otherwise, I'd consider myself muzzle-swept hundreds of times each time I enter a gun store or gun show.
     
  19. murf

    murf Member

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    as soon as i saw "restrict" in the op, i knew my answer would be, and will always be, "no".

    just another gun (people) control mantra raising its ugly head.

    teach your children how to handle firearms safely.

    murf
     
  20. thirty-ought-six

    thirty-ought-six member

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    I'd say about 75% of firearm-children related incidents and deaths are the result of the carelessness of the parents.

    I've heard everything from parents leaving loaded guns in safes with the door shut (but not locked), to downright just leaving a loaded gun in plain sight.

    My take on this is as follows..

    1. If you don't plan on using a gun for a while, or it's a collector, keep a lock on it, and the key out of reach of children. If you want to get crazy with safety, you can get a locking key safe cheap, and that way you have the keys to the locks locked up too.

    2. If you have ammo you don't plan on using for a while, keep it under lock and key as well.

    3. If you want to keep a loaded gun for quick self defence, I'd suggest purchasing a wall safe with a good combo. I've seen them for under $100.

    Some people will say "keep guns and ammo separate", which holds true for seldom used or out of season weapons, but every second counts when you have to deal with a break-in and seconds are wasted loading the gun, putting the clip in the mag, etc.

    A good wall safe will ensure that kids don't get a hold of the loaded weapon. But keeping a loaded gun in your night stand or under your pillow is just idiotic. (and yes, I've heard of people doing it).

    A friend of my dad's 6 year old son was killed, his father drove semis for a living, and the kid found the gun when he was asleep, just laying out in the open in the sleeper cab.
     
  21. GAF

    GAF Member

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    Gun safety should be required teaching in grade school. Then again in middle school and one more time in high school. Every student takes the class, no exceptions!!!
     
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