Side by Side Questions

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by JCooperfan1911, May 7, 2021.

  1. JCooperfan1911

    JCooperfan1911 Member

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    Well hi there everybody. I made a thread about the CZ side by side Coach gun a few days back and I’ve been idling thumbing through some modern entry (but good reviews) side by side offerings. Seems the Turks have the market cornered and they seem to put out a good gun at least nowadays.

    I never got into wing shooting or much bird hunting. What makes a side by side a “bird gun” as I have read the straight English stocks on some double trigger guns get called this. Like the CZ Bobwhite G2 I’m interested in alongside their Coach style shotguns:

    AD801-CC6-8229-4399-8-C5-D-D6143-C42-F9-FE.jpg

    The CZ Bobwhite G2 has features over the coach that appeals to me even more. This includes double triggers (cool) and even has chokes. Barrels are longer of course but seems like a more versatile setup.

    But is this shotgun just a “bird gun” or could it be used for squirrel and rabbits too? What about even deer hunting with buckshot if you pattern it? Occasional backyard clays? Blowing up soda cans?

    Basically could the above shotgun be a “general purpose” gun or are there attributes or stock geometry etc. that would pin it only to upland hunting and it would be poor for anything else? I just never got into the intricacies of these type guns before and would like to know more. I have shot side by sides in the past such as the Browning BSS and love the old fashioned style and shooting experience. I just don’t want to accidently buy one that is tailored for one dedicated use.

    Thank you for any help.
     
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  2. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    Buy the one that "fits" you...

    The chokes in the bbls determine what use that gun is really aimed at...

    DM
     
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  3. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    The way a SXS balances and points makes them a good choice for upland game shot at closer ranges and moving away from the shooter. Getting the gun up and fired quickly is important since you usually don't need to worry a lot about leading the target. You don't need a lot of choke since the shots are taken pretty close. In the south quail are simply just referred to as birds. If you're going bird hunting everyone knows you mean quail. But grouse and rabbit are usually hunted the same way.

    I know some old school quail hunters here in the south that would cut a SXS down shorter to remove all the choke and get wider patterns. You often don't aim as much as poke the barrels through a hole in the brush and fire when the game crosses in front of the barrel Ranges can be just a few feet at times.

    For longer range shots and crossing shots common with waterfowl hunting or most of the clay games a bit more weight and longer barrels help steady the swing and make those shots easier. Most waterfowl hunters prefer a pump or semi to get a heavier, longer gun. The better quality O/U shotguns are designed to last several hundred thousand rounds and are usually preferred by serious clays shooters.

    The straight stocks make it easier to change from one trigger to the other on guns with 2 triggers. You can certainly use any shotgun for anything you'd use a shotgun for. Most people who are serious about the clays games prefer a single sighting plane over a double. But for casual shooting I'd not worry about it. You need to practice with what you hunt with. A SXS makes an ideal rabbit gun and is certainly not a disadvantage for squirrel. Having the versatility of interchangeable chokes will let it do a lot.

    With buckshot it could be used for deer, but wouldn't be my 1st choice.

    You don't mention gauge, but I believe I see a 20 ga box of shells in the photo. IMO a SXS really comes alive in 20 ga. And for traditional upland hunting the 20 is a good choice. To me a SXS just doesn't have the same balance and feel if in 12 ga. That would be the limiting factor. If you really need a 12 to get the job done then I would lean toward a repeater.
     
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  4. Cvans

    Cvans Member

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    I hate to think how many Pheasants, Rabbits, and Squirrels I've taken with a 20 ga. SxS. If you enjoy shooting it I'd say take it hunting.
     
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  5. entropy

    entropy Member

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    Once you've had the experience of carrying a 5 1/2 lb. 20 or 28 ga. SxS on an Upland Bird hunt, and the thrill of a bird (whether a quail, grouse, pheasant or woodcock) getting up in front of you, you'll wonder why you wasted so much time not doing it.
     
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  6. George P

    George P Member

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    And it had better have a straight English stock, double triggers and a splinter forearm with fixed chokes................
     
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  7. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    I have a Bernardelli 20 ga English style game gun choked Imp/Imp and it has taken more rabbits than anything else but clay pigeons. Oodles of squirrels too but I had to get a bit closer with those chokes. So yes, they are very capable for all types of game that shotguns are used to hunt.
     
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  8. Virginian

    Virginian Member

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    Ah, the old V. Bernardelli SxSs imported by Stoeger back in the '60s. The sweetest I ever handled.
     
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  9. John Joseph

    John Joseph Member

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    Arguably, a double with two triggers gives you the quickest follow up shot.
    Faster than a single trigger.
    Faster than a semi-auto
    Lightyears faster than a pump
    At least that's been my experience.
    Fierce little birds don't wait around.
     
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  10. George P

    George P Member

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    What it DOES give you is IMMEDIATE choke selection. On a GA quail hunt we exploded a covey and one went away fast, and on the report another came right at me...........had I had a gun with open choke first and tighter choke second, I would have either missed both or made them inedible; this way I had a double and both edible
     
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  11. JCooperfan1911

    JCooperfan1911 Member

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    Seems like the concensus a side by side of this style can be quite versatile.

    I'm quite leaning towards the Bobwhite G2 over the Sharp Tailed coach. The Bobwhite G2 seems a bit more useful and for cowboy action (which I might take up some day) and even emergency defense work, will still be useful.
     
  12. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    The Bobwhite seems like a pretty OK gun. I don’t know if I would shoot clays games with one every week but I would occasionally and I would hunt with it all the time.

    Seems like a very good hunting gun.
     
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  13. Pete D.

    Pete D. Member

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    Ye olde Parker with RMC brass hulls.
    And
    Nothing points like a SXS......sighting plane?
     

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    Last edited: May 8, 2021
  14. Bill M.

    Bill M. Member

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    Bird guns are not shot at squirrels and rabbits.
     
  15. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    I bet the squirrels and rabbits are glad to hear that!!

    DM
     
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  16. MacAR

    MacAR Member

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    Why not? Mine are. My BRNO gets shot at everything that flys, walks, or crawls. If I give good money for a gun, its getting used! I admit the IC/MOD choke combo isn't the best for everything but it brings home supper more times than it don't. Lots of guys have super expensive "bird guns" that get used twice a year then sit behind glass to be oogled by them and their scotch sipping buddies. Not me. My guns are for using, not looking at.

    Mac
     
  17. Armorer 101

    Armorer 101 Member

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    Upland bird hunting has gotten like a lot of other shooting, you either have your own land or you can afford to pay to hunt “raised” birds. The traditionalists are hard core SxS gun users and usually will prefer the light 20s and 28s.
    I shoot clays and we have an upland bird style set on our clays range. We have our SxS days, our pump gun days, etc. Gives everyone a break from the autos and O/U guns. I have two SxS guns left now, a Fox double trigger and an AYA single trigger, both 12s. I sold my fancy SxS custom Grula 20, a too fancy safe queen.
     
  18. RCB

    RCB Member

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    There is an old Remington SxS at a local pawnshop that's had me thinking. I've seen plenty of singles used as an all purpose shotgun... within reason of course. I don't see any reason a SxS can't do it as well, while looking good doing it :) As for the split on bird guns, I think others have covered anything I would say. The double trigger provides for quick follow up shot while still leading. To a large degree it's about the same as having "proper" riding boots, which in this case has little to do with functional advantages and more to do with looking the part.

    That's a good looking shotgun no matter how you slice it. Much like a lever gun, sometimes things just feel right.
     
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  19. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    IF, it's in good shape, those old Remington doubles are good shotguns!

    Here's mine,

    Remingtom-Double-12-S.jpg

    DM
     
  20. I6turbo

    I6turbo Member

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    And I'd bet it'd come as a big surprise to them, too. :)
    Though I myself don't use shotguns for squirrels or rabbits, which might be what the poster meant. Those are 22 LR critters.
     
  21. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

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    People have been using their one shotgun, regardless of type, for hundreds of years.

    Almost any shotgun, depending on load, can pretty much do anything called for.

    It’s a first world problem to wonder which of your many shotguns you should use.
     
  22. Oldschool shooter

    Oldschool shooter Member

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    I own SxS in 12, 16 and 20 ga. My 20 has the frame sized for a 20 and is my favorite. It's an old Hunter Arms ( L.C. Smith) and just feels right. I used to own a 10 ga with 3 1/2" chambers, but for anything I hunt I didn't need the donkey kick to the shoulder.
     
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  23. JCooperfan1911

    JCooperfan1911 Member

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    Delete
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2021
  24. John Joseph

    John Joseph Member

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    Unless you live in a state where nontoxic shot is the law. Steel shot will damage an old SxS without chrome bores (unless of course you want to pay for Bismuth shot)
     
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  25. RCB

    RCB Member

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    Looks very similar!
    And obviously low brass on the old ones. Of course I know many who didn't even know there was a difference and have been running steel shot in their grandfather's old SxS for years with not problems and then others who ruin one on their first shot.
     
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