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sideshields for eyeglasses?

Discussion in 'Shooting Gear and Storage' started by RM, May 1, 2005.

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  1. RM

    RM Member

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    I would like to get some sideshields for my prescription glasses, so I can use them for shooting. Anyone have suggestions as to what I might buy and where to get them? Thanks.
     
  2. sfhogman

    sfhogman Member

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    Don't know. I've tried to mke my own without much success-

    But check this website. Full zoot!
    http://www.decot.com

    Might be of some help.
    Jeff
     
  3. OH25shooter

    OH25shooter Member

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    Check your local shooting range. Or, anywhere tools are sold. Machinist use them and others in the construction field. I bought mine at a local tool/machine warehouse. The range I shoot at has different cut side shields for different style eyewear glasses.
     
  4. Bushido

    Bushido member

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    uumm i had a pair of prescription oaklies. i think you can get them in clear if you want.
     
  5. EghtySx

    EghtySx Member

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    I see them at trapshoots all the time. They are like thick paper (or thin cardboard) and slip over the legs of your glasses. They used to be free and you get as many as you wanted. I never used em and I am guessing they probably charge for them now.
     
  6. pax

    pax Member

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    I purchase the ones I use from the local industrial supply/safety equipment store. They're called B-52 side shields, and they fasten to the earpieces. They're made of very sturdy plastic, they don't block out light and while they blur the peripheral vision, they do not destroy it. I get a couple years out of pair ... if I don't lose 'em or give 'em away to some deserving soul first.

    Only problem I've had with 'em is that it's a pain to take them on and off without tearing up the glasses.

    Cost is about $5 a pair, maybe a little less.

    Oh, and be sure to use glasses with safety lenses. Ordinary glass or plastic lenses are simply not sturdy enough.

    You can find them online at http://www.tasco-safety.com/sglasses/sideshields.html

    HTH.

    pax
     
  7. pax

    pax Member

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    Incidentally, for those who think sideshields don't matter...

    This past Saturday I was at the range with a group of people. One of the women was wearing prescription glasses with polycarbonate lenses, slightly oversized, but no sideshields. She was also wearing a brimmed hat which was pulled low enough that no brass could enter the top of her glasses.

    Nevertheless, a piece of brass came in from the side and lodged behind her glasses. Fortunately she got her eye shut in time, so she only had to deal with a blistered eyelid rather than a blistered eyeball.

    It was a safety problem for everyone on the line, too, because as too many people will do when in pain, she forgot all about the loaded gun in her hand as she swung around.

    If you're going to wear regular glasses on the range, get sideshields!

    pax
     
  8. David W. Gay

    David W. Gay Member

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    Any decent eyeglasses retailer

    If you can afford it, get a dedicated pair of safety glasses. Any decent retailer of eyeglasses can fill your prescription in a special "safetly glasses" format. These have side shields & use tough lenses & frames. Besides shooting, there are many people that work in factories & other jobs that require safety glasses, and normal glasses don't cut it. The advantage of having a dedicated pair of prescription safety glasses is that your standard pair won't get scratched up & worn out as quickly.

    Carry On!
     
  9. David W. Gay

    David W. Gay Member

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    An alternative

    An alternative is to use goggles, like you can find in any hardware store or home center. For simple range practice, they work great, and are very cheap. If you get some, make sure and get the kind that "breath", ie: have holes in the sides so the lenses don't fog up on a hot day.
     
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