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Silencer. Why Not?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by DaveP (UK), Jan 17, 2013.

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  1. Gordon

    Gordon Member

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    Actually S&W made a few of M-29 snub revolvers that were silent for use in Viet Nam tunnel complexes. I have seen one and the telescopic cartridge that made it possible. The gases were completely contained in a aluminum (I think) multifolded case which retracted after pushing the bullet , somehow and letting the gases out slowly. I guess that M-29 had some unique throat! :confused:
    The "word" was it didn't work well and had less power than a .45 .:rolleyes:
    http://www.barthworks.com/military/guns/guns&wtunnelgun.htm
     
  2. rondog

    rondog Member

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    Where did you hear that? It's a bolt-action combat weapon, used mainly at night for taking out sentries. Presumably in areas with vegetation for concealment. A .45 casing hitting the grass isn't likely to make a noise. What on earth would you need a velvet-lined shell catcher for with a Delisle? Maybe a piece of velvet to cover the action to deaden the noise of operating the bolt......if you just couldn't figure out how to do that quietly......
     
  3. rondog

    rondog Member

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    Nothing wrong with a thumb-forward grip, it's quite natural. Just gotta be mindful of the danger zone up near the top of the cylinder where the firing chamber and forcing cone are, and respect that area. Just keep your thumb away from there, and All is good.

    But PLEASE warn new shooters about it! They're the people we really need to be concerned with. You may have fired revolvers for years and know this as second nature, but how would you feel if you let a friend shoot your .44 magnum that DIDN'T know about this danger, and got seriously hurt because you didn't tell him to "hey, keep your thumb away from this area here". Not everybody just knows things like this.

    Same with a left-hand shooter firing an M1 Garand or M1 Carbine for the first time. If they get their thumb in the way of that oprod when it slams back, it's gonna hurt. Look at this photo of my grandson shooting my M1. I didn't notice his thumb until I made this still image from the video, and it scared me to death. That oprod would have destroyed his little thumb if it hit it.

    200810051650002.jpg

    Yes, we're drifting away from the original topic of suppressing a revolver....but gun safety is ALWAYS an appropriate topic. Sue me.
     
  4. MrBorland

    MrBorland Moderator

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    By my count, this'll be the third time in this thread I've agreed that pressure can do damage. But "can" doesn't mean "will" or "always", and certainly doesn't mean I've been cavalier and put someone I've taken shooting in danger. As I stressed above, getting the whole story helps people make informed decisions.

    FWIW, when working with a new shooter, I don't even mention the thumbs-forward grip, and specifically show them a thumbs-down grip, no matter the caliber involved. I do tell them about the gases, and if shooting magnums, I make it a point to emphasize it. I, myself, use a thumbs-down grip when shooting snubbies or magnum-powered ammo.
     
  5. Nasty

    Nasty Member

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    Saw some of those...they had a sort of (Think of the old Jiffy Pop popcorn expandable foil top) envelope that was collapsed inside the cartridge but attached that when the propellant ignited, it expanded rapidly but stayed attached and stayed shorter than the cylinder. The envelope would expand rapidly, pushing the projectile in front of it. The projectile would continue through the barrel without the expanding gasses behind it, thus losing velocity on it's trip thru the barrel and then of course more when it actually traveled to the target.

    It wasn't a suppressed weapon so much as actually suppressed ammunition.
     
  6. splithoof

    splithoof Member

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    We saw an interesting case where a disgruntled ex-boyfriend cut a hole in a pumpkin large enough to put his fist through while holding a Ruger SP101 and tried some contact-range firing into his former lover's new car (he was also drunk); the neighbors did not hear much noise, but caught him when he tried to use the sunroof of the same vehicle as a bathroom.
     
  7. Auto426

    Auto426 Member

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    Back to the original topic, as the other's have said the cylinder gap puts a stop to suppressing a normal revolver. There have been some very cleaver attempts to engineer around this though. The guys at Knight's Armament once created a silenced carbine using a Ruger Super Redhawk revolver:

    oo067.jpg

    If I recall they used some sort of special ammunition that would seal the cylinder gap when fired.
     
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