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Simple, All-around, reloading press

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Zombiphobia, Jul 7, 2011.

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  1. Zombiphobia

    Zombiphobia Member

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    I'm about to get my my old 1858 type steel frame Buffalo revolver back from my dad. Plan to put an R&D cylinder in it, and seeing as how .45LC cowboy loads are so ungoddly expensive, I'm gonna need to reload to have any fun with this.

    I don't want a bunch of parts to keep up with, just the most simplistic, easy to use, system can get for the lowest possible price. I don't know a whole lot about it, so I'm seeking some opinions on a good press.

    Here's what I'm looking at-
    http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/40406-1.html

    Would this be a good one to start with?

    What are 'seperate turrets' they are referring to?
     
  2. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    well, if you want simple, you would be better served with a singlestage or a turret.

    My experience with the Pro1000, based on a few troubleshooting sessions on a friends machine, is that its a pain to get it working right, but once its going it works great.
     
  3. Zombiphobia

    Zombiphobia Member

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    what's the turret?

    I don't mind putting it all together, I just don't want to have to buy a bunch of sepperate parts. I want it all in one handy package, if possible. Or at least as much together in one piece as I can get it.

    I don't want to go from one tool to put in the primer, another to put in the, powder, another for the bullet.. etc.

    It looks to me like this one feeds the primers, powder, and presses the bullet on one single machine. That's more or less what I'm after, I fi have to take time to load everything and put it together, that's ok, just want it all right there.
     
  4. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    A turret press is like a single stage press with the dies mounted on a rotor, kinda like a lazy susan. You can still prime on it, and you won't have to change dies between operations. The only additional thing you would want is a powder measure.

    It's simpler because you are doing each step one at a time, instead of having 4 or 5different operations going on at the same time.

    Regardless of what kind of machine you get, you are going to also need a scale to weigh powder charges, and calipers for measuring overall length. (although with .45LC, you can just turn the seating die down onto a loaded cartridge to set the length...it will be close enough)

    Lee, Lyman, Redding and a few others make turret presses.
     
  5. Zombiphobia

    Zombiphobia Member

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    aah. thanks for the help. A book covering the equipment and processes is def on my to-buy list, thanks.

    Can't wait to get started.
     
  6. john16443

    john16443 Member

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  7. angus6

    angus6 Member

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    I'd stay away from the CTD set-up, 2 things I really dislike about it are the scales and the powder measure IE: no shut off

    Grab the Kemp package with the up-grades and decent scale
     
  8. sniper5

    sniper5 Member

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    I'll put in a vote for the Lee Classic Turret. Much easier to change calibers, if you keep the turrets set up with a Pro disc measure on each it's just a matter of snapping one off and another on. For rifle, you can either run as a turret or pull the index rod (just lifts out when you change the turret) and you have a manual advance which you can use as a single stage. Get a nice digital scale or beam scale and you are good to go. The Kemp kit looks pretty good.
     
  9. Seedtick

    Seedtick Member

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    I think it would be beneficial for you to spend a little time browsing around at......

    Ultimate Reloader

    Gavin has a great site and a lot of information about the tools of the trade.

    Seedtick

    :)
     
  10. Sig88

    Sig88 Member

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    Look at a Lee single stage. I bought a Lee "C" press for less than $30 but you can spend another $20-30 for a the "O" frame. The "O" is supposed to sturdier but I needed to shave some pennies. My press works fine and have loaded about 100 rounds of 45-70 so far.

    As for dies, Lee dies have served me well for the time being, especially the Factory Crimp. Depending on what kind of gun you are using, you can get the collet dies which don't resize the whole case thus extending the case life. That should save you quite a big.
     
  11. dbarnhart

    dbarnhart Member

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  12. mdi

    mdi Member

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    Sounds like you might want a copy of The ABCs of Reloading. This book shows reloading equipment, methods and safety. Read through it and you can decide which reloading equipment suits your needs. I'd say start with a single stage press, or kit (I personally don't like kits as you get stuff you might not need, and I would rather research and purchase tools as I need them). Look at the sites for Graf & Sons, Inc., Midway USA, Midwest, Natches (and others) for what's available for reloading equipment/tools...

    FWIW; I got started in '69 with a Lee Loader in 38 Special, 1 lb. of Bullseye, 100 CCI small pistol primers, 100 generic lead SWC bullets, my once fired brass, some shop rags (dampened with mineral spirits for brass cleaning), a 4" X 4" about 24" long (placed on the floor and between my knees as an "anvil") and, of course, a yellow plastic mallet :D I reloaded that same 38 Spec. cartridges for mebbe 6 months, 50 at a time...
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011
  13. dbarnhart

    dbarnhart Member

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    mdi: That sounds almost exactly like the way I started.

    I've been scanning ebay looking for a 45acp Lee Loader in the original cardboard box with the black lid, just simply for reasons of nostalgia.

    I still have the plastic mallet, BTW.
     
  14. CZ57

    CZ57 member

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    The Lee Classic turret is a great press, just don't buy it it KIT form. Buy a reputable powder scale or your in for headaches, REDDING, LYMAN or RCBS. The LEE Pro Autodisc works well but lacks the flexibility of Say an RCBS Powder Measure, but for starters it will work. Get a decent dial caliper from Midway or elsewhere, One turret for each caliber you intend to load and the appropriate dies. Lee's are fine. This press set-up is capable of single loading like a single stage but as a Turret (Semi-Progressive) the rate of production should be 175 rounds per hour +/- once you get it down pat.

    Don't forget a couple of good manuals. ;)
     
  15. the count

    the count Member

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    The progressive press you are looking at is waaaaaay to involved if you are looking for simplicity. Nothing against LEE, I started out with a Lee classic press but I almost think you want a truly simple single stage, which means you go through the steps of resizing, priming, powder, seating in batches, one after the next. Best way to learn if you ask me.

    This would work for you.... http://leeprecision.com/xcart/Breech-Lock-Challenger-Press.html
     
  16. BBDartCA

    BBDartCA Member

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  17. GaryL

    GaryL Member

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    If you are looking for simple and cheap, I'd go with a Lee CC press. You will need all the peripherals, but that is a press you will have forever, and if you decide to get a progressive down the road, the CC will still do a fine job for small batch operations.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=317831
     
  18. RustyFN

    RustyFN Member

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    Another vote for the Lee classic turret. Very easy to set up and operate for a beginner.

    If you are going to load at the higher rate with auto indexing you will need to adapt the Uniflow to a powder die in the turret. Check out the kit at kempfgunshop.com because it comes with dies but no scale, you can buy a decent scale to start without having to buy the Lee scale.
     
  19. noylj

    noylj Member

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    The least expensive way to start for pistols, and some rifles, is with the little Lee Reloading Press and a set of dippers.
    The Lee Safety Scale works quite well, but is not as robust as others. The Lee Perfect Powder Measure works very well, if you read the instruction thoroughly and mount it rigidly to the bench.
    The Lee Pro 1000 has many supporters. I would not own a 3- or 4-station progressive. The biggest problem with the Lee progressives is getting the primer system to work. This is also an area where every progressive falls down on the job occasionally.
    Read stickies about getting started. Watch videos on the manufacturer's web sites and YouTube.
    You can load a lot of good ammunition with just the little Lee press and the dippers. You can move to a powder measure (probably the Lee Pro Auto-Disk) and a better digital or balance beam when you want.
    Buy and read several manuals. Take note of the powders they selected for testing and see if a couple of them are used for several cartridges you care about and the weight of bullets you will want to shoot.
    There is a Lee Load Master forum that addresses many problems people have had with Lee and how to fix them. Same as Brian Enos has a forum where many of the problems people have had with Dillon equipment is discussed.
    Start your reloading with jacketed bullets to minimize problems.
     
  20. Fishslayer

    Fishslayer Member

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    I've been very happy with my Lee Classic Turret. Simple, fast enough for my needs and so far low maintenance.

    My favorite feature is that I can buy a separate turret (about $10) for each caliber. Changing turrets takes seconds.
     
  21. Zombiphobia

    Zombiphobia Member

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    this reloading will be for an 1858 black powder revolver with R&D conversion, so I dont want to use jacketed bullets, just lead.

    Thanks for the replies, guys.
     
  22. kingmt

    kingmt Member

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    There is nothing wrong with starting with lead.
     
  23. mdi

    mdi Member

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    http://www.beartoothbullets.com/tech_notes/archive_tech_notes.htm/51 This article is a few years old so the prices will be lower than that available now. Still good info on an easy budget start-up. I managed to get started without some of the stuff listed, 'cause I already had some items that would work (I used a counter sink for champhering the case mouth), and didn't need others (case trimmer, champher tool, primer pocket cleaner, case lube).
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2011
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