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Skeleton trigger and hammer

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by Frightener 88, May 8, 2009.

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  1. Frightener 88

    Frightener 88 Member

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    Pardon my ignorance, but what exactly is the point of the skeleton trigger and hammer? Ill agree it does look cool. But what seperates them from the stock hammer and trigger? Thanks!
     
  2. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    Beside being an appearance item, they offer a lighter weight, which may (depending on the type of gun) allow a faster lock time or a lighter trigger pull.

    In "most cases" it's just because they look cool.
     
  3. Frightener 88

    Frightener 88 Member

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    yes. yes they do. thank you. if anyone else has more insight into this, by all means, please let me know.
     
  4. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    "...what seperates them from the stock hammer and trigger?..." Cost. They have nothing to do with the trigger pull.
     
  5. 2RCO

    2RCO Member

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    A bit lighter weight--which does very little if anything for trigger pull-- and the look grrreat that's it!
     
  6. Frightener 88

    Frightener 88 Member

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    Again, thats about all i could figure. thanks for the input!
     
  7. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Very real reasons!

    Skeleton hammer = Lighter weight = faster lock time = better accuracy.

    Skeleton hammer = Originally used on the lightweight Colt Commander to prevent hammer bite (Hand getting pinched between the hammer spur & shorter grip safety tang.)

    Must be used now with beavertail grip safeties to allow the hammer to nestle down inside the safety tang when cocked. There is no place for a spur hammer to go inside the beavertail safety.

    Skeleton trigger = Reduced weight = Prevents trigger bounce, which allows for a lighter sear engagement.

    They were first used on 1911 Match guns with very light trigger pulls.
    A heavy steel or solid long trigger would tend to bounce back against the sear when the gun cycled and cause doubles.

    The Colt Gold Cup used a wide, heavy steel trigger, but they had to add a spring & sear depressor lever to prevent trigger bounce doubling.

    It has nothing at all to do with the trigger pull, except it allows it to be safely set lighter.

    rc
     
  8. 2RCO

    2RCO Member

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    I'd love to see testing that proves this is anything more than 1/100,000of a second if at all.

    I completely agree!
     
  9. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I can't provide a test.
    I just know it works.

    When I gunsmithed for 5th Inf AMU we ran very lightened hammers in our centerfire class 1911's. The very best shooters could depend on shooting slightly higher scores with the light hammers in thier guns.

    Whether it was faster lock time, or just between thier ears, I couldn't say.

    I can say it worked though.

    rc
     
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