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slide lock-or slide release

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Jeb Stuart, Jun 6, 2019.

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Do you use the Slide lock to release the receiver or do you releasing the slide by pulling it to th

  1. Use the Slide lock as a release

  2. Pull to rear and release

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  1. TomJ
    • Contributing Member

    TomJ Contributing Member

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    I pasted the following from Glock's owner's manual. Like the P365, either option works. It sounds like your friend's instructor was misinformed.

    If the slide (1) is in the forward position, hold your GLOCK pistol with your firing hand and, while keeping your finger off of the trigger and outside of the trigger guard, grasp the rear of the slide at the serrations with your other hand and pull the slide fully back (Picture 7) and then release it, allowing it to return to the fully forward position (Picture 8).

    or

    If the slide is locked in the rearward position, either press the slide stop lever (27) down to release the slide and return it to the fully forward position or grasp the rear of the slide at the serrations with your other hand and pull the slide fully back and then release it, allowing it to return to the fully forward position. The pistol is now loaded and ready to be fired by pulling the trigger.
     
  2. ATLDave

    ATLDave Member

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    For whatever it is worth, I will add the following observation from the competition "practical" games world:

    It is very common for new shooters to USPSA and related gun games to come into the sport using the slide-rack method of releasing the slide, as opposed to using the slide-[NAME OF CONTROL HERE]. This is usually abandoned within 6 weeks, as it becomes very apparent to them that releasing the slide with the lever while rebuilding the grip is materially faster than fooling with getting the left hand from the magwell, up to the slide, yanking on the slide, and then getting the left hand back in place on the grip. That's a pretty significant kinesiologic detour.

    So it seems logical to me that one should use the slide-[NAME OF CONTROL HERE] unless there is some concrete reason not to do so. With some guns, there is such a reason. But using the slide-[NAME OF CONTROL HERE] is a sensible default.

    As for the "universality" of the slide-retraction* method, I wonder what kind of scenario people are contemplating where they imagine having run a strange gun that they aren't familiar with dry, need to complete a fast reload, and have a full magazine handy. I sort of doubt that has ever happened.

    Now, if someone truly doesn't care about reload speed, ever, under any circumstances, then it truly makes no difference.

    * I think the term "slingshot" is potentially confusing, as that same word is used to distinguish one of two different common methods of grasping the slide for retraction.
     
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  3. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    Two very good points.
     
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  4. Charlie98

    Charlie98 Member

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    Do you use the Slide lock to release the receiver or do you releasing the slide by pulling it to th

    I use the slide release to release the slide, although once in a while I will just drop the slide manually... it depends. Oddly enough, my Kahrs specify, in the owner's manual, that I drop the slide with the slide release... but I've found you can do either... as long as you don't ride the slide forward.


    I'm not really sure why this is such an issue of contention... everyone shoots a pistol differently (minus the general basics, of course...) and unless you are forced into a specific doctrine because of training or the specific manual of arms, I don't see what it really matters.
     
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  5. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

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    Pull the slide lock to release the slide. It is faster and can be done one handed. If you are training to be in a gun fight, you want to be the fastest and most efficient as possible. Using 2 hands to complete a 1 handed operation is not the way to do that.
     
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  6. HPCadm17

    HPCadm17 Member

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    I use the slide stop/release whenever I can. I have stubby fingers, and on full-size 1911's my strong side thumb doesn't reach the release so I use my support hand thumb instead.
     
  7. 40-82

    40-82 Member

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    Is it considered so wrong to keep track of the number of cartridges expended and do the magazine change with the last one still in the pipe?
     
  8. wally

    wally Member

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    Video shows why its the "best" your off hand is right there when you finish inserting the mag and start to resume the two handed grip. I don't see any benefit to the slingshot method, unless the gun lacks a lever. Its why I rate ambi slide lock levers far more highly than ambi mag releases -- my left hand index finger hits the right hand mag release often times better than my stubby right hand thumb does. I practice a fair amount left handed shooting. If i carry a backup its usually carried for left hand draw.
     
  9. Charlie Horse

    Charlie Horse Member

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    No, that is a fine way to do things. However, in a real gunfight, some folks find that they lose count...:eek:
     
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  10. JR24

    JR24 Member

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    Pretty much. I use it with 1911s, always have, just works for me.

    I use the overhand with Glocks and my 226 as the release is too small for me to reliably use at speed.

    I honestly had to think about it a bunch to answer the question as it's so automatic I couldn't remember what I did.
     
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  11. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    Under pressure? In a gunfight for the first time in your life when your heart is pounding and your just trying to keep your stuff together? Nah, doesn't work that way.
     
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  12. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    I have been playing with the slide stop/release with the P-365 and it works real well, feels like I am manipulating a small 1911 like the EMP I had. I like it.

    I have used it to drop the slide on a fresh mag at the range when practicing with it, but, as I posted, I have not practiced fast mag changes, just loaded up the mag again, dropped the slide and shot some more. :)
     
  13. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart member

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    A
    Get to know your gun and become one with the gun. Use what every method that you and the gun both like.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  14. Good Ol' Boy

    Good Ol' Boy Member

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    When punching paper I slingshot.

    When running drills I use the "lever".


    Since the LC9s was mentioned and I used to carry one I will comment about it in this regard. Weirdest dang thing, with a loaded mag the "lever" was easy to use to drop the slide but with an empty mag it was not possible. It had to be slingshoted.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  15. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart member

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    Even though I do not carry the LC9S much anymore, because the trigger is so light, I still love that gun and for myself was and is a very fast gun. And since I have the safety, I can still use it naturally. (had it out last weekend). And I love the SR9C. Still impressed with the build quality and soft shooting. Every time I thing of getting a new compact, I go shoot the SR9C and say why? This gun runs great. Just bought more 17 round mags for it. (sorry, did not mean to get off topic).
     
  16. priler

    priler Member

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    I always use the slingshot method.

    it works in any pistol I can think of. (including the BG, and yes, I may actually have to use HIS mags when I take his pistol).
    it increases the odds of properly chambering.
    ..increases the odds of going into battery.
    ..the slide has already picked up speed by the time the first contact is made with the first round in the mag, decreasing the odds the second round in the mag may move out of or into a bad/worst position, increasing reliability, including with a possibly weak recoil spring. (it doesn't slightly drag and pick up speed for chambering the first round).
    it keeps the slide catch and, to a much lesser extent(harder steel), the slide cut-out sharp and with the correct angle, for when i actually need to use the slide catch as a slide release because I may have only one working hand, I don't want it coincidently not working then.


    oh, and an AR15 is not a Glock, two totally different animals.
     
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  17. Good Ol' Boy

    Good Ol' Boy Member

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    What if your weak hand is not available to "slingshot"?
     
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  18. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart member

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    There are a number of drills.

     
  19. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

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    I release the slide manually for two reasons.

    1. If done right, it provides slightly more energy than simply releasing the slide with a control because the slide is released from slightly farther back and there's more spring compression. That means a more positive forward slide stroke which can help when chambering the first round from a magazine with a stiff spring, especially if the gun is a little dirty. I've seen this happen in person. I once got a pistol dirty enough that it would reliably fail to chamber the first round from a fully loaded mag when the control was used to release the slide but would still chamber the first round every single time when the slide was racked manually to release it.

    2. One of my carry guns doesn't have an external control to release the slide and I practice techniques that will work for all of my carry guns.

    I know it's a little bit slower, but I'm willing to take the small time penalty in exchange for the two benefits above.
     
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  20. JDR

    JDR Member

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    If you’re practicing your tactical reloads with multiple loaded mags, which is always a good thing to practice,then the answer is “neither”.
     
  21. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart member

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  22. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    For clarity, while I'm pretty sure when you both (and others) say you do it "manually", you mean you grab the slide in some manner and pull it back and release it, I'll point out that using the slide stop/slide release to release the slide is also doing it "manually".

    Unless your slide auto-forwards when you insert a mag, most guns will require you to release the slide manually by some technique.
     
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  23. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

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    While your point is accurate, having re-read my post, it seems unlikely to cause any genuine confusion. At one point it explicitly states that the contrast is between when the slide "was racked manually" as opposed to "when the control was used to release the slide".

    The other post quoted might not be quite as explicit about the specific contrast in question, but, given the topic of the thread and the context of the comment in the post, it still seems adequately clear.
     
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  24. Charlie98

    Charlie98 Member

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    Indeed. Manually... that is to say not using the fixture (slide release) to drop the slide. I guess you could split hairs...

    That's why these questions seem sort of specious to me... and this is one that is very likely to careen off on a tangent.
     
  25. Jeb Stuart

    Jeb Stuart member

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    Well said John. And as I have gotten older, I like to keep things simple. Not interested in learning all the slide stops and really do not care if I can shave a portion of a second. I shoot most pocket guns and small Micro guns. As the OP I should have been more explicit. Should have stated that. Large guns like the Beretta 92f and 1911's were not my concern in the question.

    There is something to take away from the Thread. Some folks might want to be more aware of the gun they purchase before they commit. Slide Lock is not important to me, But for those that only use the stop or train to use the stop, there are many guns that are not conducive to using them. Sometimes the little things matter.
     
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