Slide Release or Slide Stop?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by SwampWolf, Aug 24, 2021.

  1. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    Skirting the age old argument but addressing the issue, the slide "lever" performs two functions, releasing and stopping the slide. For years I called it a "slide release" (maybe because you need to release the slide manually, whereas the stop function is done automatically) but I concede that most pistol manuals that I've perused call it a "slide stop". My answer to a question maybe never asked is to call it a "slide control lever", which is what it does.
    Just my thought for the day. :)
     
  2. 5-SHOTS

    5-SHOTS Member

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    I think it's correct in the first place to call them all slide stops. Because not all the slide stops activated by the empty magazine also work as slide releases: some are in fact so hard that they cannot be used manually to release the slide. Some pistols also have an internal slide stop which obviously cannot be used manually as a slide release. Then there are some pistols with manual only slide stop that I seem to remember that can be used as a slide release (Ruger LCP for example).
     
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  3. FIVETWOSEVEN

    FIVETWOSEVEN Member

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    I call them slide catches myself. Their primary function is to stop the slide after the magazine has been expended. Pressing the slide catch to chamber a round is just a bonus with modern handguns.
     
  4. 25-5
    • Contributing Member

    25-5 Contributing Member

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    History and language are revised daily. Not a good thing.
    It is a slide stop. Then, now, and forever.
    5 shot had a nice explanation.
     
  5. Otto

    Otto Member

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    Glocks have two separate parts....a slide release and a slide lock. SIG refers to them as a "slide catch lever". Terminologies depend on the firearm.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2021
  6. Mike J

    Mike J Member

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    The above is correct it is always a slide stop. Not always a slide release. Kahr does instruct one to use the slide stop (slide release) to chamber a round from the magazine (not to use the slingshot method) on some of their pistols.
     
  7. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    To me, they are all "slide stop" until you use it to release the slide then it becomes "slide release". ;)

    Is that too simple?

    Like guns are guns until you reload and guns become "unloading" devices. :D And your life's motto changes from "Reload to shoot" to "Shoot to reload".
     
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  8. 5-SHOTS

    5-SHOTS Member

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    Perhaps even "hold open" is a general enough definition to be able to include practically all cases. Hold open does not distinguish between slide stop, slide release, internal or external, manual or automatic. How about it? Can it be correct or am I missing something?
     
  9. fastbolt

    fastbolt Member

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    Glock uses the term Slide Stop Lever for the lever assembly that locks the slide back on an empty chamber (or when manually manipulated to lock the slide back).

    The Slide Lock is a lever catches the front bottom barrel lug and locks the slide & barrel to the frame.
     
  10. Zerodefect

    Zerodefect Member

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    Qi'taw.

    That's what the Kilingon translator calls it. That's good enough for me.
     
  11. Corpral_Agarn

    Corpral_Agarn Member

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    Yes.
     
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  12. fastbolt

    fastbolt Member

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    As an armorer, I tend to call the assemblies by the terms used by the manufacturers of the various guns. It helps to use the correct nomenclature if ordering parts. ;)

    As a younger shooter, when learning to shoot pistols, I used the terms Slide Stop & Slide Release interchangeably, since both were commonly used terms for the same parts. Since I used my dominant hand thumb to quickly released a locked-back slide to run forward for chambering a round from the magazine, it didn't seem unusual to refer to the slide stop lever as a slide release, since it could perform both functions (locking and releasing a locked slide).

    In subsequent years, as the semiauto pistol was replacing revolvers as LE duty weapons, I became a firearms instructor, and then an armorer for various brands of guns. The use of the support hand for performing the overhand and slingshot methods of releasing locked-back slides was becoming increasingly common. However, using the slide stop lever to release a lock-back slide was still a dominant method, especially among experienced shooters who used pistols with prominently sized slide stop lever tabs (1911's and S&W metal-framed pistols, to name a couple). The narrow, slim slide stop tabs, like those seen on the Glock and Walther 99's, was less easy to find and securely press to release a locked-back slide for some shooters, and the overhand/slingshot method involving the use of the support hand was useful for such folks.

    Like with many other manual manipulations of a gun, when there are a couple ways to perform some manipulation, different shooters may view advantages & disadvantages from different perspectives, including any previous training and their own experiences.

    The overhand/slingshot method requires the use of both hands, and is usually a little slower when timed on the clock.

    The use of the dominant hand's thumb used to press/lower the slide stop lever frees up the support hand sooner - to achieve a 2-handed shooting grip, or, to perform some other manipulation (especially during a defensive encounter), and gets the pistol back into battery and ready-to-fire condition faster, as well.

    Trainers and experienced shooters have discussed the merits of both techniques for many years. One of the popular proposed advantages of the overhand method is that it's the same manipulative technique used for other purposes, like clearing some stoppages, Tap-rack-assess, etc, so it instills and reinforces the manipulation.

    I've always been able to use the slide stop lever as a slide release, myself, even with the thinnest/slimmest of the lever tabs used on Glocks Walthers, SIGs, etc. As a firearms trainer I've seen it taught both ways, and have heard both methods discussed as being appropriate by different gun makers. I've listened to instructors discuss advantages and disadvantages of both methods for LH shooters using pistols designed for RH users (guns without ambi lever assemblies). As long as someone could perform either technique safely and effectively under stress, I didn't care which technique was used to safely get the gun back into ready-to-fire condition.


    Just some thoughts.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2021
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  13. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    I brought up a slide stop vs slide release type topic many years ago and it did not go well at all.

    Whenever this comes up I just pretend the HK P7 is the only pistol in the universe. o_O
     
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  14. BrotherMaynard

    BrotherMaynard Member

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    I push up on a "slide stop" and push down on a "side release". It also happens to be the doohickey that keeps the wheels on the bus that is my 1911.
     
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