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Snakes in Fl

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by cleardiddion, Feb 22, 2010.

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  1. Mitch from LA

    Mitch from LA Member

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    That my friend is Slippery Pete a large ornery male who now wears a radio-transmitter (AKA bling). He definitely gave me all I could handle and then some.
     
  2. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    Google for "Komodo Dragon". The world's largest lizard. Have on occasion killed and eaten people. Mean, cranky, ornery carnivores!

    NatGeo periodically reruns a program on them...
     
  3. fireside44

    fireside44 Member

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    I was thinking the same thing. Our gov't really has become a bunch of money grubbers, charging for a permit for a species that is VERY detrimental to the habitat of the Everglades (among others), which are protected. Couldn't help but think "greed". Should be free, just like killing hogs, you are doing nature and the state of FL a serious favor.

    I visited friends in Ely MN some years ago and they had the carcass of a snapper in the back of a pick up that was very similar if not a bit larger in size to the specimen Mitch posted. They were blown away (as was I) and so grabbed it to show everyone else back at the house.

    Ely is near the Boundary Waters, which is full of lakes and very remote. I wouldn't doubt the possibility of 150+ lb monsters back there. I have seen some pretty large living specimens, just never quite the size of the one they had in the back of that pickup.
     
  4. Mitch from LA

    Mitch from LA Member

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    That's the risk you take when you hang out in the personal space of a 300lb carnivore, with a bad attitude and a mouth full of nasty.
     
  5. SASS#23149

    SASS#23149 Member

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    In the case of hunting large constrictors....

    Who is hunting who????

    A large one drops out of a tree..yep,they climb...and knocks u down,you are in deep kimshee.

    I also don't understand having a 'season' on them..well,if you have to buy a license or tag,there ya go.....money !
     
  6. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    My prediction is that the state will drop the fee and open up year 'round hunting for the big snakes. All it's going to take is a few attacks on people or pets and enough of a public outcry.
     
  7. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    I lose track of what's been said, where, since this same thread is running over at TFL. Anyhow, remember that the license fee and season only apply to a limited amount of state land. I'm guessing it's multiple-use, and maybe they want to control how many of who are where, when. But, just guessing...
     
  8. TedP

    TedP Member

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    It is $26, hardly a huge money making scheme.

    I think you are right Art. The places you need the extra permit for are Wildlife Management Areas, not private land.

    I guess FWC is saying they are not safe to eat though. High mercury levels.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2010
  9. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    that makes a little more sense.
     
  10. hirundo82

    hirundo82 Member

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    Plus the place the the snakes are worst is probably Everglades National Park, where of course hunting is banned. That means snake removal there is being taken care of by people paid with our tax dollars.
     
  11. Quoheleth

    Quoheleth Member

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  12. BullsAndClays

    BullsAndClays Member

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    Mitch, that pic of the snapper is awesome. I took the 400/500 level herpetology class at Marshall U. in WV. One of the master's students was doing research with the hellbender at the time, so I got to see some of his work, but they aren't anywhere near as dangerous as the snapping turtle.
     
  13. Mitch from LA

    Mitch from LA Member

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    Does Thomas K. Pauley teach that one? I've seen some folks from Marshall present their research at a few conferences.
     
  14. tiger rag

    tiger rag Member

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    What part of Louisiana Mitch?
     
  15. Mitch from LA

    Mitch from LA Member

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    Funroe, though I originally hail from a small town on I-12 called Holden.
     
  16. SHvar

    SHvar Member

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    "In regards to the monitor lizards, the Nile Monitor is quite large though not the second largest lizard in the world (I forget the name, but I believe it is a monitor lizard from Borneo). Like many animals, they are aggressive when cornered, but they are far more likely to run away from you given the chance."

    Ah, my reptile specialty, monitor lizards, Ive been a long time keeper and was breeding them once.
    The second LONGEST by a few rare examples could be the crocodile monitor from New Guinea, the record by official length (not by weight, mass, or overal size) was a water monitor that grew to 10ft 4 inches but was nowhere near the adult weight of a komodo dragon. There are a few species of monitors that grow to lengths of 6ft plus, I have one of those that is currently over 10 years old, and as an individual she is a very gentle, but a big predator of small animals none the less.
    For example my 6ft 9 inch female white throated monitor weighs around 40lbs at most, a comparable female komodo would weigh closer to 75lbs.
    Komodo monitors are apex predators, nothing on their islands is a big enough threat to them, their only predator is themselves (most young are eaten by adults).
    As far as indigo nsakes go, old wives tails about them growing to 10ft, or even close. The longest native species of snake is the eastern diamondback rattler, there are a few rare examples that grew to 7ft, Im sure the record was over 8ft for one example.
    The nile monitor is a close relative to my "little girl" but the nile is s long thin water dwelling species that holds Africas record for length (one caught in an elementary school playground along the nile river was 7ft 11 3/4 inches, nowhere near by weight.
    Dogs are very dongerous to all but one species of monitor lizard, monitors are fast, they will run long before they stand their ground, but when they do they bite like a pair of vice grips with steak knives for teeth, and have very very sharp claws that are propelled by very strong legs.
    My big monitor came in handly when snakes escaped on occasion from a friends collection, only if they were venomous, she found them in a hurry, the trick was to get them before her, she loves to eat them.
    I had a finger broken by one 4ft monitor that grabbed a mouse from my hand one time and the mouse wrapped around the finger.
    Shoot the snakes with a small rifle or pistol in the head.
     
  17. SHvar

    SHvar Member

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    By the way realistically until a python or anaconda exceeds 12 ft its no danger to a healthy adult human. You should hunt them as a pair, just for the reason that its safer from accidents, not from the snakes.
    Snakes are slow on the ground aside from a few species, vipers are very fast strikers, and dogs are far more dangerous to all but about 2-3 species of snake in the world than snakes are to dogs.
    Shoot them if you dont know how to handle them and kill them otherwise.
     
  18. Mitch from LA

    Mitch from LA Member

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    The Komodo is far and away the heaviest extant species of lizard, I probably wasn't too clear about that. I am admittedly no expert on Varanid lizards so I have to defer to those in the know about them.

    In regards to the longest native species of snake, it is the Indigo Snake, (at least in the Eastern US, not sure about the West). Conant and Collins list the adult size range as 60-84 inches for an Indigo Snake (record was 108) and the adult size range for an Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake at 33-72 inches (record was 96). Both are large impressive snakes to be sure.

    I agree about dogs being more of a danger to snakes than vice versa, and that vipers (we specifically have Pit Vipers here in the new world) are very fast strikers. Hence why it is best to leave them be.
     
  19. rswartsell

    rswartsell Member

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    Herpet-o-faunas? Well hail far cuz I thot we wuz talking snakes and sech.:D

    With that there book larnin' you done, you thank a 12 ga could handle them herpet-o-faunas?:confused:
     
  20. Mitch from LA

    Mitch from LA Member

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    To quote my good buddy Josey Wales, "I reckon so." The advice on shooting invasive snakes in the head was spot on. Snakes do not have very robust skulls and a 12-gauge would be more than enough. For the record, I don't have a problem with shooting invasive species or game species (as long as folks stay within the rules).

    I have a bit o' book larnin' but fancy might not be the best word to describe it.
     
  21. BullsAndClays

    BullsAndClays Member

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    Yes, Dr. Pauley was my instructor. I unfortunately ended up in IT after graduating; a major loss of direction on my part!
     
  22. wilkersk

    wilkersk Member

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    Used to carry a .410/.22 over&under with #9 lead shot on the tractor. But that was for south Ga/North Fl variety of snakes, and mostly just for fun. Only exception was "never kill a king snake!"

    As far as a hunting method, we just let them find us.
     
  23. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    The largest species of snake we have in Alabama is the grey rat snake, known here as a chicken snake. 60''+ are commonly found. I personally saw one that easily exceeded 8' swimming in front of me while I was fishing in a swamp. Black snakes (racers,coach whips etc.)are in the 6' range with some specimens exceeding that by a fair margin. Copperheads will average about 2' with often get much bigger. I killed 2 that exceeded 5' and saw one that got away that was closer to 6'. My ex brother-in-law killed one copperhead with a bush hog that was 4'' in diameter. No idea how long it actually was.
     
  24. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    12 ga shotgun with buck shot should do the trick along with a centerfire backup handgun of your choice 9mm or larger. This is for BIG snakes or reptiles.

    A 5 ft Copperhead is a huge Copperhead. I have seen one coiled up that was as large as your common large diamondback rattlesnake (4-5ft). Left him be after almost stepping on it out in the woods. It appeared to be asleep.
     
  25. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    And EXTREMELY intimidating! It doesn't take long to realize that a hoe handle ain't near long enough!
     
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