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Snap Caps for dry-firing a Model 63?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by C0untZer0, Nov 19, 2012.

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  1. C0untZer0

    C0untZer0 Member

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    I'm not sure what the issues are with dry firing a Model 63 (22LR). Or if there are any issues.

    If there are issues - do rimfire SnapCaps alliviate those issues?
     
  2. hariph creek

    hariph creek Member

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    It's my understanding and practice to use snap caps with any RIMFIRE gun. The firing pin hits the rim of the chamber. Normally the cartridge itself provides a buffer. A snap cap provides this same buffering quality.
    There may be some exceptions to this?
    I don't worry about it with modern centerfire guns, though.
     
  3. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    Don't know of any snap-caps especially made for rimfire firearms. They do sell "training rounds", but these are solid aluminum, and would be just as harmful to keep dropping the firing pin on as the gun's own structure is.
    One possible solution is the use of no. 6 (yellow) drywall anchors. They do get flattened at the rim very quickly, so you have to rotate it in the chamber a few times, then replace it with another.
    The issue with dry-firing your M63 is the same as with any rimfire gun; the firing pin smacks against the inner edge of the chamber which normally supports the rim of the cartridge. This impact, on a repeated level, can result in peening (flattening) of the sharp edge of the firing pin, and also in depression of that chamber edge. Either of those two conditions, or a combination of both, can cause poor ignition reliability in the firearm.
     
  4. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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  5. hq

    hq Member

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    I've used empty shell casings. You just have to turn them a bit on each revolution of the cylinder to provide "fresh" brass for the firing pin to strike. I also have snap caps for .22 but on a revolver it's so much easier and cheaper to just pick up a few casings and use them instead.
     
  6. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    Store bought snap caps on 22's wear out very quickly so there is a cost issue. Use the plastic drywall anchors or spent brass.
     
  7. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    The ones to which Guillermo refers to are sold in quantity (24 in the example he linked to.) The manufacturer also states that they are good "for up to ten" uses, then should be replaced. They are designed to dent where struck just as a brass case rim would.
     
  8. bigfatdave

    bigfatdave Member

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    Rather than disposable snap-caps, I just use disposable wall anchors.
    Or spent casings.

    How much dry-firing are you intending to do?
     
  9. stanmo

    stanmo Member

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    ^^^^^^
    This


    I wouldn't sit around and dry fire it 1,000 times. Once in a while won't hurt anything. I've dry fired mine and looked at the cylinder with a magnifying glass, the firing pin does NOT hit the cylinder. That being said, there is something stopping it so I wouldn't make a habit of it.
     
  10. Remllez

    Remllez Member

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    The best way is to buy a brick or 2 of your favorite bulk ammo and shoot em up Pard. The .22 snap caps sold commercially are nothing more than proving caps....not meant for dry firing repeatedly.

    The wall anchors or empty casings work....but why? There is more fun to be had shooting than pulling the trigger whilst aiming at an imaginary spot on the wall. The truth is its very hard to lighten the trigger pull reliably on a .22 caliber handgun.
     
  11. oldbear

    oldbear Member

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    I don't know if they do or not. I look at SnapCaps this way, they are cheep and can't cause any harm so why not use them.
     
  12. C0untZer0

    C0untZer0 Member

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    I can't be at the range all the time, and I'd like to allow my daughter to dry fire it - it's going to be her gun.

    I am going to the range with it tonight so I should get enough spent casings to last a good long while.

    What kind of drywall anchors are people talking about?

    Is there a particular size that I can just get or do I have to go to the hardware store and just eyeball it to see if it will fit in a .22?

    EDIT: sorry - I see now where MedWheeler recomended #6 drywall anchors, thanks
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2012
  13. willypete

    willypete Member

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    I use #4 drywall anchors. I have seen them in yellow and gray. I don't know about #6, but I have seen some packages labeled as #4-6. Just go to a hardware store and get a box of 50 or 100. It should cost you a few dollars.
     
  14. Remllez

    Remllez Member

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    Dry firing is all well and fine but no true substitute for actually shooting. For a young person dry firing will get boring very quickly. Nothing beats hands on shooting, just ask your daughter which she would prefer and go from there.
     
  15. Hondo 60
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    Hondo 60 Member

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    Like hq above ^^^^^ I just use empty rimfire casings.
    Just turn 'em a bit before each firing.
    Otherwise they may flatten out to the point that you have issues with ejecting 'em.
     
  16. bigfatdave

    bigfatdave Member

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    This isn't a smartass answer, although it sort of looks like one:
    Stick an empty casing in your pocket
    Go to the hardware store

    The size I have feeds and ejects (only 3-4 in a box magazine, they bind up after that) in autoloaders, feeds and ejects in Henry tube magazines, and will work about perfectly in revolvers. The problem is that I matched up a casing and bought a handful, not paying attention to sizing/brand/part# or anything but size, shape, and a bright color (so I can find them on the carpet)
     
  17. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    The problem with dry-firing any S&W rimfire is not that the firing pin puts dents in the chambers.
    It doesn't.

    But they are prone to broken firing pins when dry fired.
    And then they might.

    Coupled with the fact it is getting harder all the time to find replacement firing pins for the older models?

    Don't do it.

    The dry-wall anchors, or spent shell casings are your best bet.

    rc
     
  18. C0untZer0

    C0untZer0 Member

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    I already don't like using spent brass - it seems like I'm setting myself up for an accident waiting to happen.

    And after just one time around dry firing they won't eject. I did turn them, I gave them a quarter turn so the dents were at 3 O'clock and after dry firing they had new dents at 12 O'clock and I needed a wooden dowel to pop them out.

    I really love this revolver though...
     
  19. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    You have the 3" M63?
     
  20. C0untZer0

    C0untZer0 Member

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    yep, factory new, just picked it up yesterday.
     
  21. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    Good choice. Definitely a high quality fun gun,
     
  22. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    I don't have any suggestions for dry firing that have not been given already. I just wanted to commend you on your taste in great rimfire handguns. The 63 is a superb bit o' kit.

    I suspect that once your daughter gets to shoot at the range a lot of her desire to dry fire the gun will vanish. ESPECIALLY if you set her up with a steel target that goes "DING!" and moves when she hits it.
     
  23. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Regardless of what anyone on an Internet forum tells you, you should not dry fire a rimfire revolver. You will damage the breach face with the firing pin. If you're going to dry fire a rimfire use a set of snap caps. Even if I'm completely wrong they only cost a few bucks so they are a cheap insurance policy just in case I'm right.

    Also, a spent case is fine for one or two strikes but after that the spent case doesn't supply enough of a cushion to protect your gun. Again, snap caps are a cheap insurance policy.

    In most cases a centerfire revolver can be safely dry fired but that doesn't mean you should do dry fire practice without snap caps. (insurance policy?)
     
  24. tubeshooter

    tubeshooter Member

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    A surprising amount of people will tell you it's OK to dry-fire a .22 revolver.

    I saw a revolver I had been keeping an eye out for at a local Gander Mountain. "It's safe to dry fire" the clerk said, as he clicked away...

    ...I told him I wouldn't do anything to that gun that I wouldn't do to my own, and left it at that.


    They already wanted too much for the gun; no telling how many people have clicked it now. No, thanks!
     
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