so.. i quit reloading.

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Axis II, Sep 10, 2016.

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  1. Ifishsum

    Ifishsum Member

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    Save your gear, at least for a while. One day you may just get the bug again for one reason or another; finding a deal on a rifle in an odd caliber, ammo panic shortage, whatever. I started because of one cartridge when I couldn't find any more ammo for a rifle I'd just purchased. Went all in and bought dies for pretty much every cartridge I own. I might go for 3 months doing very little loading and then at times I'm back there doing something or another nearly every night. It ebbs and flows, never really a chore unless I'm low on match ammo the night before a shoot and don't have any prepped brass. Then it feels more like work - but I try to avoid it by keeping up on my brass prep in short bursts. That's really the only part of the process I dislike.
     
  2. Joshboyfutre

    Joshboyfutre Member

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    Sounds like u kinda got mad at yourself for forgetting to write down your loads. If ur a rookie ur gonna make rookie mistakes... Take it from a rookie. Once the thrill of learning everything wears off there is a bit of boredom involved I guess. Hell buy a new caliber to learn. 308 has been keeping me plenty busy. Don't sell ur stuff cause you will regret it come springtime... Bet on it!
     
  3. dartor

    dartor Member

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    Save your equipment, you'll be glad you did

    I have just gotten back into reloading this year after about 15 years. I kept all my reloading equipment and I'm glad I did. I don't have a lot of extra money after the bills are paid. If I had sold my reloading gear back then I wouldn't be able to reload today. I'm stunned at today's prices of gear and components. I'm using components that are literally half the price of today's prices.

    So you're having doubts now. Likely it will pass. When it does believe me you'll be glad you hung on to your reloading equipment.
     
  4. WelshShooter

    WelshShooter Member

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    Me! According to AmmoSeek the cost of factory 6.5x47 in the US is over $2 a round. I handload for 50 pence a round (around 66c per round). On the 100m range I only shoot ~30 rounds a day; for long range I will shoot around 100-150 rounds a day. Since my round count doesn't change, the cost savings play a big part for me to keep shooting.

    http://ammoseek.com/ammo/6.5x47mm-lapua
     
  5. tcoz

    tcoz Member

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    WelshShooter, have you first taken into account all the money that you've ever spent on reloading equipment and anything else (lights, benches etc) that you wouldn't have spent if you didn't reload? Also, if you maintain a set inventory of components that you never fall below, you probably have to include the cost of those as well since they've become a fixed cost just like your equipment.
    I hesitate to think how much I have tied up in components (20k+ primers, 20k+ bullets, 50lbs+ powder) right now and I don't intend on falling much below that level due to the unstable political climate regarding all things gun related. Of course I suppose I'd be stockpiling loaded ammo anyway if I wasn't a reloader.
    I do not however count my time like some people do. I love reloading and look at the time spent as time spent pursuing my hobby that I'd be diddling away in some other way otherwise.
    My point is just that there are so many associated costs that have to be considered when determining whether we save money reloading. My advice to prospective reloaders is always "don't do it if your only goal is to save money".
     
  6. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    I started handloading for my Charter Arms Undercover way back in the mid '70s. It was fun and I could make rounds that were better suited and cheaper for my gun than I could find in the way of factory ammo.

    Didn't do any reloading for a number of years then started again, now with 9mm., following a period of time when I was rehabbing from knee surgery (sure had fun testing out all the different loads I had in a SIG P228). After that another lull and several moves in the interim have me thinking about starting up again now that we've finally got settled in to our new home.

    Would never consider selling off any of my reloading equipment. Probably wouldn't get much for it and it would be really expensive to replace nowadays.
     
  7. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    I quit doing body work over 30 years ago, but still have all those tools.

    Unless one is pressed for cash, I say hang onto stuff.
     
  8. MarcS

    MarcS Member

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    I hardly ever post due to raising 2 grandsons who were placed with me and my wife. The boys take up so much time that I have trouble finding time to reload much less post but I just let my equipment sit until I get a break and then reload when I can. Working on getting 500 empty 357 mag. cartridges done for target practice but 50 that will be for hunting. Keep your equipment until you have time and learn to write everything down. I not only keep a log of every round loaded I also write the powder & charge weight, bullet weight and OAL down on an index card and tape it to the box the rounds are stored in.
     
  9. WelshShooter

    WelshShooter Member

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    I appreciate the sentiment but a quick calculation below.

    I've fired 700 rounds of 6.5x47.
    At cheapest factory cost ($2.30/round) = $1,610 (USD)
    At reloaded cost (60c/round) = $420 (USD)
    Saving of $1,190 (USD).

    I don't have quite as much in bulk storage as you (maybe 10kg -- oops, 22lb of powder, 10k primers and 1k bullets per calibre), so if I had spent $1k on loading setup I'm looking at positive $200 right now.

    Also, I enjoy reloading, don't see it as a chore and love squeezing every last drop of performance out of my firearms! The money saved is just a side affect to my shooting fever.
     
  10. dmoserwy

    dmoserwy Member

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    I shoot in the summer and spring when it is nice outside so I can reload in the winter when it is too cold to shoot. Or it could be phrased the other way. I enjoy doing both.
     
  11. Crashbox
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    Crashbox Member

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    I've gone months without reloading, then start up again when supplies run low or the weather's particularly nasty outside.

    I find the process to be therapeutic for the most part, drudgery on occasion. However, I have NEVER totally given up- I can shoot a lot more for the same $$$, which is certainly an incentive to continue.

    I do find one item that still seems to be costly: when I purchase a new firearm in a chambering that I don't have the equipment to reload for, the cash outlay to do so can be substantial. But I still make the INVESTMENT.
     
  12. Robert101

    Robert101 Member

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    You can (and need to) make your own call. For me, I'll be a reloader forever. I like not only enjoy the solitude in pulling the handle, but also going through my reloading charts, making new loads, and saying to others, "yes, I reload my own". In bring to my qualifying classes ammo stored in old coffee cans that hold about 200-300 rounds. I tend to get strange looks from people who have those nice brand new boxes of ammo with really high price tags on the outside. Good feeling. I also feel like a happy dog waiting for his master to arrive when the UPS truck driver delivers my internet ordered bullets and brass at the front door. I could go on, but you get the idea.
     
  13. jwrowland77

    jwrowland77 Member

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    Where you buy your 9mm from? It's about $15/50 around here for WWB. It's $10/50 for the really cheap stuff, which works out to $20/100. You can easily load 9mm for $10/100. I load it even cheaper than that with my cast boolits.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  14. thomas15

    thomas15 Member

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    My Dad was a handloader and cast his own bullets. I literally grew up with it and when I found out that that there were some shooters that actually don't reload I was surprised. I just thought handloading was a necessary part of shooting.

    Anyway when I got out on my own I had a few guns, not many and no handguns at all. I started shooting "backyard" trap using a handthrower to launch clays and so I began to reload shot shells. I did not have much disposable income and so I used a Lee shotshell loader and hulls picked up off the ground. That gear made it possible for me to shoot, I didn't have the money to buy ammo and even when I did, it was inexpensive shells from KMART, they were at the time $2.99/box of 25. We was poor as they say.

    I did this for a number of years and then started shooting handguns. For years I used only factory ammo but it was ok since my actual consumption was not very great. Then I started shooting weekly at my clubs pistol night and this is what got me handloading centerfire ammo. I always knew that I would handload but really didn't have the actual need so I couldn't see spending the money for the stuff on the bench. I found that my ammo consumption and that of my wife and son and the fact that my clubs indoor range (for winter shooting) required lead, plated or coated bullets, this was the factor that forced me into handloading.

    I do all of my handloading in my unheated garage. Very cold in the winter and hot in the summer. When it's nice out I will make a lot of ammo so that I'm not suffering in the cold or heat. For me a "lot of ammo" is 5-10k rounds. Sometimes I feel like doing this other times I don't. But I always have plenty of ammo to shoot and I don't have to go on an extended shopping trip to find some. I seem to alternate my interests between shooting sports and fishing. So at times I building up my fishing tackle supplies and at other times it's shooting supplies. Variety is the spice of life.

    When I was shooting only factory, I was always looking for ammo deals. Once I started handloading my own I went cold turkey with factory and my ammo consumption rates skyrocketed overnight. Last week I decided to clean up my ammo cabinet and realized that I have almost 2000 rounds of 9mm factory, 1400 45 acp and 700 38 Special. I will shoot it eventually but I have developed loads that work very well in my guns so I t will be for the brass that I shoot that stuff.

    One last thought, I really don't understand why guys buy especially the low end equipment and then when they upgrade sell off that stuff. A one hundred dollar entry level Lee press isn't worth that much on the used market but could be very handy some day to the handloader and having it stored in a box to my way of thinking is like money in the bank. Unless it gets flooded in the a hurricane it should last a century. Handloading is not for everyone though and as others have said, we should enjoy our hobbies and if this activity is a chore for you then you need not stay with it to please any of us. Like others have said, I too have read all of your threads and have thought to myself that you seem to be making this way more difficult than it needs to be. Again not an insult, if you were my neighbor we would be friends I'm sure. But if that was the case, you would be slaving at the bench because I would be dragging your behind to the range at least once a week and you would need a constant supply of ammo. :) Don't believe me ask my brother.
     
  15. Axis II

    Axis II Member

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    thanks for the help once again everyone. I was thinking the other day when I went to the basement and seen all the stuff just sitting there and it hit me. I have been so consumed this last month-2months with hunting season coming up that its the only thing ive been doing. I come home from work and it used to be load up 100rds and run to the range. now its grab the bow and sling arrows, hang stands, prep gear. its also kind of discouraging that I get to the range and its either closed for some social event or someone else is shooting pistol and I want to shoot 100 so I have to wait for them or come back. once all my hunting headaches are done in the next week or so I will try and get the 223 load again and its going into the book asap and making 500rds then start on 44 and 9mm.
     
  16. kcofohio
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    kcofohio Contributing Member

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    ohihunter2014, there you go, that will cure what ails you! :)
     
  17. RainDodger

    RainDodger Member

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    If you continue hand loading..... write down your loading data. Always keep a written record.
     
  18. evtSmtx

    evtSmtx Member

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    I love y'all and am thankful for all the good advice i've gotten but on the question of reloading in hot weather - I'm downright ashamed of my brethren here.

    If I can do it in south Texas in July and August, y'all can too(ok, maybe arizona gets a pass)


    but seriously and to the OP's point, I'd say keep your grear and if the enjoyment of the hobby doesn't come back in a few years, then sell.
     
  19. evtSmtx

    evtSmtx Member

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    um, never mind, just saw op's latest post. But, the point about hot weather remains.
     
  20. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    Wonderful news. I'm pleased that you have decided to stay with it.

    There are all sorts of ways to record data. You need to find the way that fits your needs.

    Search the forum, the subject comes up from time to time.

    I use three ring binders with one tab per cartridge (I had two for 223 Remington, one for plinking/varmint loads, one for Service Rifle competition loads).

    I have sheet for notes, a sheet that records reloading data, a sheet for velocity and a sheet for groups.

    I'm old school.:)

    Many folks use spread sheets on their computer.

    Develop a system that works for you.

    P.S. I just reloaded a few handgun rounds a day or so ago, the first time at the reloading bench since my 700 round prairie dog reloading session back in July. Lulls happen.

    Welcome back!
     
  21. Cheesemaker

    Cheesemaker Member

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    OP - maybe if you look back through your old posts on this forum you will find what worked well for you? IIRC, you mentioned your loads in some detail, what worked and what didn't.

    So, maybe there is some documentation....
     
  22. Axis II

    Axis II Member

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    I thought about that too. I thought all my hunting stuff was done and I could jump back into this but found out today one of my best spots got 99% logged over the week. I have other spots I have to scout now.

    once I get some free time I will go through here and see what I can find. I kinda remember what they were but I used BM and h335 so don't want to say oh I remember 25gr and kaboom! cause it was 25gr of the other.
     
  23. exbrit49

    exbrit49 Member

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    Shoot and reload

    Usually go to the range at least once a week and as soon as I get home, the brass goes in to the tumbler for cleaning and is reloaded that evening or within the following few days.
    I love to shoot and love to reload! each is an extension of the other. Besides which, if I was purchasing ammo I couldn't afford to shoot as much as I do. A typical range session involves a minimum of 50 rounds each of 9mm, .357, 45ACP and 45 Colt. usually about 15 rounds of 30/30 and 7.62x39 rounds out the range session.
    Yep I like to load and shoot, shooting as often as I do keeps me honed up with each of my pistols. Keeps you very proficient and comfortable with my favorite shooters.
    So my advice is shoot MORE and then you will LOAD more
     
  24. splattergun

    splattergun Member

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    Ohihunter, I had another think (yeah, I know, and it hurt)
    YOu say you didn't write down your fave loads, but maybe you did. Why don't you review the reloading threads you started and see what you wrote about your data in those. Bet ya a whole dollar you wrote about the loads you liked there.
     
  25. orionengnr

    orionengnr Member

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    Attention to detail is a fundamental component of reloading...near-OCD may be better.

    We are all different. If it "ain't for you", you'll know it. If it is, conversely, you'll know that too.

    Life is too short to do something you don't enjoy. Divorce rates prove that. :)
     
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