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Some pics of my Ruger SR1911

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Nakanokalronin, May 10, 2011.

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  1. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

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    Just got drenched by the testosterone trying to wade through this post! High Road. High Road. Here's my take. I'm an opinionated guy. I bought the new S&W 1911 E Series and while it's a solid performer I know there are things I don't care for. I knew them going in to the purchase and calculated what it would cost me ahead of time thanks to a bit of research. What I get out of the deal is a pistol that I can believe in for my intended purpose. Just as my Jeep goes hunting with me and my sedan takes the family out to dinner. As rella aptly said "It is what it is." (mate the tool with your purpose and understand that's all it is, even if it makes you grin.)

    As for the Ruger, I may at some point buy one though cast has never been my thing. Before you call me a gun snob remember I can get a beautifully fit and well functioning PI 1911 for hundreds less than a Ruger but I do tend to buy domestic vs. foreign when given the option.

    Hats off to the OP for the great review and pics. Let us know how the range time goes as well. If you're taking requests for pics how about a few of the sights, inside the dust cover, rear of slide close up (to see fit) and one of the bowtie, if so dressed.
     
  2. Hoth206

    Hoth206 Member

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    I've seen folks do some pretty nice polishing work with Ruger's revolvers, I'm wondering if this wouldn't be a good candidate for some of that type of experimentation on a 1911. Looks to be about the least expensive stainless 1911 around.
     
  3. Smaug

    Smaug Member

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    Earlier, a couple of you said "Ruger 100% over Para"

    Based on what? Actual experience with Para or just a popularity contest?

    Honestly, I would've gone that way too if this particular 1911 were out at the time I bought the Para. but just based on Ruger's longer history and reputation.

    Now that I have the Para, there is really nothing to complain about. Well, it doesnt seem to like flat point bullets, i should admit that. I'm not sure I would continue to have the pro-Ruger bias any more. Para specializes in 1911s, even if they're not as popular overall as Rugers.

    I'm taking the Para GI Expert this evening for my first action shooting session; we'll see how it performs.



    "Well begun is half done."
    -Aristotle
     
  4. Dobe

    Dobe member

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    I believe the DW's were offered low at first, and once the interest was there, they raised the prices.
     
  5. Ben86

    Ben86 Member

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    That could happen too, but it seems with Rugers the guns are a little bit higher at first while the demand is really high, then the price drops a bit as demand levels off.
     
  6. rellascout

    rellascout member

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    DW changed a lot of the specs on their guns. They went to forged frames from cast and that accounted for a lot of the price increase. IIRC. I personally liked it better when the CBOB was a sub $900 gun. It is more 1911 than 99% of shooters will ever need. It was 90% of the Ed brown at a 3rd of the price.

    I stated: "Ruger 100% over Para"

    Para has one of the worst QC records in the 1911 industry over the last 10 years. They have gotten better since they moved production to the US. IIRC they are now made in NC outside Charlottle. The Canadian production was spotty. I personally have seen but not owned quiet a few problem Paras. Due to this first hand experience they are on my no buy list.
     
  7. Dobe

    Dobe member

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    Ruger had offered the Security Six at a break-even loss. So, we'll see where the price goes from here. Hopefully, it will remain stable.

    At the risk of upsetting some, Taurus isn't far behind. You either get a great one, or it goes back and forth for repairs.
     
  8. rellascout

    rellascout member

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    I would tend to agree with you about Taurus too. I have heard that Para's US CS is better than Taurus but then again almost any CS is better than Taurus.

    That is the issue I have with Para. Some of them are great and run well but if you get a lemon you get a real lemon and no one wants to be stuck making lemonade. LOL
     
  9. Ben86

    Ben86 Member

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    While I can't comment on how well they help customers in need I can say that the CS reps sound so condescending on the phone every time I call to ask a question. I don't appreciate that.
     
  10. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    Wow. I decided to look this one over a little late...but it seems that emotions are running high.

    I haven't seen one of the Rugers yet, but I hope to very soon. As far as how well they did with their clone...we'll have to wait and see. As the guns become more common, the reports will start to filter in.

    I wasn't aware that Ruger decided to make the plunger tube integral with the frame. This is a mistake, and I can't figure why a room fulla sharp engineers didn't see that.

    The tube is a small, thin, relatively fragile part that is exposed and easily damaged should the pistol be dropped. With the original design, a cheap part can be replaced in 5 minutes. With their version...the whole frame is kaput, and will need to have the integral tube milled off and drilled for a standard part. A 20-dollar fix turns into a 200-dollar fix. Dumb move, methinks...and it's reason enough for me not to buy one. Not that I would anyway. I've got quite enough 1911s, thank you.
     
  11. Nakanokalronin

    Nakanokalronin Member

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    I really don't see many people dropping guns when at the range or class. Its good for someone new to 1911s plus it cuts out a step in the manufacturing process. No need to re-stake when it eventually comes loose.

    All of my other 1911s have staked on plunger tubes and I've run them hard and never dropped them or had the plunger tube crush in any manner. A crushed plunger tube happens mostly when staking them with an improper tool.

    Even if someone is not interested in the SR1911, I would suggest at least checking one out at a LGS to judge it by the feel and fit of the parts. Its surprisingly tight and well finished for the price most places are asking.
     
  12. ohwell

    ohwell Member

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    Looking at the tube on mine Tuner it does seem to be a little less fragile looking than the one on my Springer and its pretty well protected by the grip, thumb safety and slide stop seems it wood be hard to hit it by dropping it.
     
  13. Dobe

    Dobe member

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    I don't see it an issue either. The tube is pretty well protected from dings.

    I've dropped many of mine over the years, and have yet to damage a plunger. Although, I do bow to your expertise and experience.
     
  14. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    Quote:

    > No need to re-stake when it eventually comes loose. <

    If the frame holes are correctly chamfered, and the tube properly staked to begin with...there will rarely be a need for restaking one. I guess that's too difficult a process for present-day manufacturers since I haven't seen one that's properly done in a good many years. Same goes for the grip screw bushings.

    I have seen plunger tubes damaged from dropping. I've also seen more than a few recently manufactured tubes crack at the rear of the tube from the side-load imposed by the thumb safety, and allow the plunger to wobble to and fro.

    I guess I'm just lookin' at it from a mechanic's standpoint. They're the ones who have to fix'em when they break. Way yonder faster and easier to replace the tube than have to do expensive and labor intensive work on the frame in order to repair what should be a 10-minute problem.
     
  15. Nakanokalronin

    Nakanokalronin Member

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    I agree which is why I like that its part of the frame. Every 1911 I've bought gets torn down, cleaned, relubed and gets the plunger tube staked correctly with the proper tool before reassembly. For the grip bushing I usually just use some blue loctite which has worked on every 1911 I've owned so far since most manufactures don't bother staking them in.
     
  16. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    Quote:

    > Every 1911 I've bought gets torn down, cleaned, relubed and gets the plunger tube staked correctly with the proper tool before reassembly.<

    Well...There's more to it than just using the right tool. All of them are staked using essentially the same tool. It requires using a carbide burr to chamfer the holes to give the legs somewhere to spread out into...like a rivet. The same principle applies to the front sight tenon. Properly done, it should last the life of the gun.
     
  17. Lateck

    Lateck Member

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    Nakanokalronin;
    Thanks for the photo's. Neet.
    I'm a 1911 newbie and I like mine! (SR1911)


    Lateck,
     
  18. rellascout

    rellascout member

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    How does it shoot?
     
  19. Racinbob

    Racinbob Member

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    Dang Tuner! The plunger tube was something I liked. Now ya got me thinking and it hurts. Someday I'll learn.
     
  20. Remllez

    Remllez Member

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    I dunno,the plunger tube being integral seems like a nit pick to me. It seems very well protected and I would worry about the sights breaking or stocks cracking if dropped before the plunger tube. I can count on one hand the number of times ive dropped any firearm in over 45 or so years of shooting.

    To make a statement that the plunger design is a mistake is very prejudicial and judgmental. I've read about this pistol considerably and this is the first time I've heard that statement made.

    Like others have said the proof will be in the pudding. The price of these new Ruger 1911's and the quality of Ruger firearms in general leads me to believe that the room fulla engineers did a darn nice job
     
  21. Nakanokalronin

    Nakanokalronin Member

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    Not according to the variety of 1911s I own and have re-staked. Most of them actually spread out more like a rivet cone shape. Factory wise, they seem to only slightly spread the rear of the posts enough to keep the plunger on.
     
  22. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    Quote:

    >To make a statement that the plunger design is a mistake is very prejudicial and judgmental. <

    How is it predjudicial and judgemental to call attention to the fact that if the plunger tube is damaged and can't function that it's going to be a harder, more expensive fix than simply replacing the tube.

    It doesn't require dropping the pistol to damage the tube. The walls are pretty thin. Every time the safety is manipulated, it imposes a sideload on the end of the plunger and the tube. Add MIM to the equation, and cracking or splitting becomes a greater possibility than with machined steel.

    Quote 2:

    >>Not according to the variety of 1911s I own and have re-staked. Most of them actually spread out more like a rivet cone shape. Factory wise, they seem to only slightly spread the rear of the posts enough to keep the plunger on.<<

    The various tools used essentially do the same thing. A tapered pin is forced into the hollow end of the leg to spread it out. The difference lies in the frame prep. If the chamfer is insufficient to allow the leg to spread out enough to solidly anchor the tube...it won't last. If the frame is correctly prepped and the staking technique is properly executed...it will.
     
  23. CZ57

    CZ57 member

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    Ruger must have considered the plungers durability and possible damage to it when they decided to cast it as part of the frame. With the reputation of their customer service at risk they would have to replace an entire frame if the plunger tube became damaged. Evidently the engineers felt that it would be a high mileage part of the frame with little worry about replacing frames.;)
     
  24. MCMXI
    • Contributing Member

    MCMXI Contributing Member

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    If you damage the plunger tube, why would Ruger be responsible for fixing it?
     
  25. CZ57

    CZ57 member

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    They wouldn't if it were dropped or whatever but plunger tubes have fallen off the frame after extended round counts or from a high number of +P rounds fired.;)
     
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