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Southeastern bowhunting

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Barny, Sep 8, 2019.

  1. Barny

    Barny Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Messages:
    66
    Hello friends

    I recently moved from Iowa to the Containment Area for Relocated Yankees, North Carolina (I.e. Cary) to attend North Carolina State University.

    I am not looking for areas to hunt but more or less concerned with how you deal with the heat during bow season. I am accustom to cooler temperature and the absence of "critters" such as snakes, ticks, etc. I assume bug spray and put the knife to the meat ASAP will be a recurrent response.

    I have worked in the soyabean fields all summer so I am used to the heat but I can sit in the A/C work truck or grab some cool water if needed.

    Been a good experience here thus far

    Eric
     
  2. rayatphonix

    rayatphonix Member

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    Location:
    WNC
    I recommend a Bug Tamer jacket if mosquitoes are present. They allow any breeze to circulate.
     
  3. courtgreene

    courtgreene Member

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    Location:
    NC
    the most popular hunting bug repellent as far as I can tell is thermacell. As for beating the heat after the shot, you were right. Get it out of the skin and into the cooler as fast as possible, and do your best to not get stung by yellow jackets.
     
  4. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    Location:
    Fl panhandle
    Lightweight clothing and a thermacell. Also invest in a camelback. As for the reptiles, just watch where you walk.
     
  5. Glockula

    Glockula Member

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    Location:
    Eastern NC
    Thermacell is the key. Watching out for snakes is good. I have seen most of my bigger moccasins and rattlesnakes this time of year. Light clothing and good scent control. I try to not have to walk too far in this heat. I just sweat and my smell is too strong for good hunting.

    I gut immediately and either ice or refrigerate the meat in quarters. I killed one of my bigger bucks when it was 82 out.
     
  6. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Location:
    Georgia
    Hunting seasons are generally long and bag limits generous. I don't rush things. Archery season starts here Saturday. I can hunt every day from then until mid January somewhere. The 1st 4-5 weeks are either archery or primitive weapons. I no longer take archery season as seriously. It is generally pretty cool up until about noon, especially out of the sun. Starting Saturday I'll pick up my bow and go for long walks in the woods from before sunup till 10-12. But I don't get serious about trying to kill anything until rifle season opens in about 5 weeks.
     
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  7. Barny

    Barny Member

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    Mar 30, 2008
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    I think I will execute this tactic. I do not have a climber. I am used to having several ladder stands and blinds on the home farm. Very new to the idea of public ground hunting.
     
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  8. Captcurt

    Captcurt Member

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    Location:
    Ozark Mountains of Arkansas
    Barny, you owe it to yourself to get a climber. The is especially true if you hunt public land. A good, light weight climber lets you pack in and pack out or change locations a lot easier than a ladder. Plus you don't have to pack tree steps or climbing sticks.
     
  9. Barny

    Barny Member

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    Captcurt

    I think I will look into buying a climber. I have never used one however and I don't particularly care for height, thus makes sense why the permanent ladders at the home farm barely get used...
     
  10. courtgreene

    courtgreene Member

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    Location:
    NC
    In a climber, heights are easier to deal with than strapped-on platforms or ladders. Something about having a seat with a cage around you and a harness makes you feel more secure. At least that's my experience. Now, a large wooden platform with 4x4's for legs that is lag-bolted to a tree, that's about as comfortable as you can get. Short of that, climbers are the way to go. They tend to be loud though.
     
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  11. Barny

    Barny Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Messages:
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    All

    Fantastic advice and appreciate all of the input. Yesterday I did my first bow hunt on the ground. My initial concerns were not the problem, my problem was deer coming in and cruising the dove field corn strips that I could not see but only hear.

    I ordered a sit n climb after that unintentional screw up. Looks like the ar-15 build is taking a back seat for a bit.

    Thanks again

    Eric
     
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