Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Spanish Gun Terminology

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by abe586, Sep 16, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. abe586

    abe586 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    I can't seem to find any sites or people that know the Spanish gun terms. Anyone know any terms or sites of hand?
    Would be very grateful! Thank you!
     
  2. Hoplophile

    Hoplophile Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Messages:
    238
    Shotgun = Escopeta
    Pistols = Pistolas
    AK-47 = Cuernos de cabra (horn of the goat, known for the curved mags). This is only in Mexico.
    Gun = Arma
    Ammo = Municion

    That should help?
     
  3. abe586

    abe586 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Thank you so much!:p
     
  4. Aguila Blanca

    Aguila Blanca Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    1,693
    Cartridge = Cartouche

    Rifle = Fusile

    Pistol (single) = Pistola

    Pistols (plural) = Pistolas
     
  5. For Freedom

    For Freedom Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2008
    Messages:
    187
    Puedo ayudarte un poco. He enviado mensajes en ese foro:

    http://www.armas.es/foro/foro.php?TEMA=3&T=Armas_Militares

    Está locado en españa. Las personas en ese foro son muy amables. Pueden ayudarte con todas tus preguntas. Yo sé algunas palabras.

    Rifle: Fusil, Rifle
    Gun (in general): Arma
    Pistol: Pistola
    Forum: Foro
    Bullet: Bala, Proyectil
    Magazine: Cargador
    Long gun: Arma larga
    Automatic rifle: Fusil automático
    General gun accessories: Pertrechos
    Ammunition, Rounds: Municiones
    Cartridge, Shotgun Shell: Cartucho
    Casing (just the casing): Vaina
    Gunpowder: Pólvora
    Primer: Fulminate, Pistón

    ¿Vas a ser el líder de una revolución en latinoamérica?:scrutiny::uhoh::neener:
     
  6. MD_Willington

    MD_Willington Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Messages:
    3,692
    Location:
    Canuck in SE WA State.
    On the CETME TSR trigger.

    T = Tiro = shoot.
    S = Seguro = safe.
    R = Rafagas = burst.
     
  7. Rubber_Duck

    Rubber_Duck Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,357
    Location:
    New Mexico
    The term is actually "cuerno de chivo," however they mean the same thing (goat horn).
     
  8. LaEscopeta

    LaEscopeta Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    983
    Location:
    Los Estados Unidos
    A couple of comments on words posted above:

    Rifle = El fusil and sometimes la carabina, especially in South America. I think this is used for rilfes in general, and not just for short, light ones (i.e. not used like the French word carabine or the English word carbine.) I've also seen the word “rifle” used in a Spanish newspaper in Guatemala.

    arma = gun but also weapon in general. Arma de fuego specifically means firearm.

    3 other words:

    machine gun = La ametralladora
    submachine gun = El subfusil ametrallador
    gunman = El pistolero, as in one skilled in the use of firearms.

    Finally, the Spanish word for shotgun, La Escopeta, comes from the root word for to sweep or to clear away. Kind of descriptive of what a shotgun can do. Not that you asked…
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2008
  9. TeamPrecisionIT

    TeamPrecisionIT Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Messages:
    569
    Location:
    Virginia Beach, VA
    That's what I call it, (I am cuban) but some of our south and central american friends call it 'cabra.' Just like Chupacabra - you know the thing everyone is hunting for with their cuerno de cabra, lol.

    Damian
     
  10. spwenger

    spwenger Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2006
    Messages:
    391
    Location:
    Show Low AZ
    Here's a Link:

    Spanish/English Firearms Dictionary

    I think that this reference is more likely to reflect usage in Spain, as opposed to some of the Latin American variants.

    Note that the terms fusile and cartouche, above, are French. The Spanish versions are fusil and cartucho.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2008
  11. scrat

    scrat Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2007
    Messages:
    6,882
    Location:
    Monrovia, CA
    Spanish lessons on THR gotta love it

    hahahha
     
  12. JesseL

    JesseL Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Messages:
    2,492
    Location:
    Prescott, AZ
    Corto = Short, as in 9mm Corto = .380 ACP.
     
  13. jerkface11

    jerkface11 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Messages:
    5,498
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Largo=long as in 9mm largo
     
  14. Vaarok

    Vaarok Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,887
    Location:
    Varies
  15. 230RN
    • Contributing Member

    230RN Marines raising the left-leaning Pisa tower.

    Joined:
    May 27, 2006
    Messages:
    6,632
    Location:
    Calirado
    I just discovered today that Google has a whizbang translator. Individual words or whole business letters. I had to write a legal-ish letter to Mexico, copied-and-pasted the whole letter in English into the input box, selected Spanish to English, clicked "translate," and voila!

    (That's not a Spanish word.)

    I translated the Spanish back to English, just to see how well it did, and it was pretty good, but I fine-tuned it by avoiding wierd English cases and tenses and idioms and complex sentences, and it re-translated back almost perfectly.

    I am impressed.

    I am reminded of the story of the first computer/machine translator where they tried to translate "The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak" into Russian, and then back to English again.

    The result? "The vodka is good but the beef stinks."

    Brrrrump-Tssssh!

    I was paying a professional translator, then discovered the Google Gadget this AM. Personally, I think she was using the Google Translator, too.

    Seriously.

    I don't want to break her rice bowl, but I don't see paying for it anymore. Poetry and high literature probably aren't suitable for the Google Translator. But for expository text, it does just about any lingo on earth into just about any other lingo on earth.

    I found it by Googling "TRANSLATOR" and one of the hits was the Google Translator.

    Huh.

    Who'd'a thunk it?

    --Terry
     
  16. B yond

    B yond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Messages:
    1,270
    F you silly
     
  17. LaEscopeta

    LaEscopeta Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    983
    Location:
    Los Estados Unidos
    It looks like Google reversed engineered the Babble Fish web translator (http://babelfish.yahoo.com/). But Google added a few new features, and appears to look at whole sentences together, not just at the individual words. Both are excellent at getting the basic meaning out of text in another language, but neither are going to come up with something that sounds right. As an example, and to get this thread drifting back to firearms related, below is the introduction to the NRA Spanish web site (link above) churned through both translators into English:

    Babble fish:
    “When you see the pages on this site and www.nrahq.org, you will find a information wealth on the NRA and how our activities affect the lives of all the Americans who love the freedom. Our main target to protect the Second Constitutional Amendment takes almost to each one of the levels of the local, state and federal government to fight legislative battles. The NRA also offers 178 programs that benefit citizens who own arms as well as to which do not own. Some of the extensive categories of programs include: accident prevention of weapon for children, personal security, self-defense, competitive shot, basic education of firearms, programs for youth, women and officials of the application of the law; and of course education of hunting.
    The members of NRA come from all type of social conditions and all type of demographic antecedents. Information on the inscription to the NRA and the advantages of being a partner also is explained in these pages. The force of the NRA always been has based on the dedication of its members. We hope that you one to our fight to protect its liberties.”

    Google Translate:
    "When you see the pages on this site and on www.nrahq.org, you will find a wealth of information about the NRA and how our activities affect the lives of all Americans who love freedom. Our fundamental objective of protecting the Second Amendment Constitutional leads us to almost every level of local government, state and federal legislative battles to fight. The NRA also offers 178 programs that benefit citizens who possess weapons as well as those who do not possess. Some of the extensive programme categories include: prevention of accidents weapon to children, personal safety, self-defense, competitive shooting, basic education of firearms, programmes for youth, women and officers of law enforcement, and since then education game.
    NRA members come from all kinds of social conditions and all sorts of demographic background. Registration information to NRA and the advantages of being a partner is also explained in these pages. The strength of the NRA has always been based on the dedication of its members. We hope you will join our fight to protect their freedoms."
     
  18. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2006
    Messages:
    10,598
    Location:
    Rocky River, Ohio
    machinegun = ametralladora (from the French "mitrailleuse")
     
  19. rhubarb

    rhubarb Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Messages:
    765
    Location:
    South Texas
    This is Spanish I've learned in the Rio Grande Valley from immigrants from all over Mexico. It may or may not apply in your local vernacular:

    AK: el cuerno de chivo, cuerno
    AR: M16
    bullet: la bala, el balazo
    cartridge: el cartucho
    cartridge case: el casquillo
    hunt (noun): la tirada
    machine gun: la ametralladora, la matraca
    magazine: el cargador
    powder: la pólvora
    rifle: el rifle, la carabina (with carabina probably more common among Mexicans and rifle more common among Mexican-Americans speaking Spanish)
    Mosin 91/30: el pinche cañon
    pistol: la pistola
    pistol (revolver): el revolver
    pistol (semi-auto): la cuadrada
    scope: el lente
    shot: el tiro, el disparo
    trigger: el gatito
    target: la diana
    to shoot: tirar
     
  20. bthest86

    bthest86 Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2006
    Messages:
    362
    Location:
    Mexico
    I've heard riflé (pronounced reef-lay) for the term rifle.
     
  21. crushbup

    crushbup Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    Messages:
    492
    I'd recommend not using a free translator for any serious business. I knew a woman from Chile who taught Spanish and she could tell within an instant when something was machine translated because of how weird it sounded. This should hold true for any Spanish speaker, so to avoid embarrassment I'd pay a translator.

    ¿La clase de español en The High Road? ¡Me gusta mucho!
     
  22. bthest86

    bthest86 Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2006
    Messages:
    362
    Location:
    Mexico
    Hee hee hee hee
     
  23. spwenger

    spwenger Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2006
    Messages:
    391
    Location:
    Show Low AZ
    Are You Sure?

    In Mexico:

    Balazo is "gunshot." Bala is "bullet."

    Cacería is "hunting."

    Escuadra (as in "T-square) is a semi-automatic pistol.

    Lente is "lens," not a telescope or telescopic sight.

    Gatito is "little cat;" gatillo is "trigger."

    Blanco is "target," as in tiro al blanco for "target shooting."
     
  24. rhubarb

    rhubarb Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Messages:
    765
    Location:
    South Texas
    No, I'm not particularly sure. I just posted as I understand, and my fading memory and gringo ears are imperfect.

    Balazo: The only use I can remember hearing is someone saying, "Le voy a echar un balazo" while pointing as with a gun. I didn't realize the finer point of bullet/gunshot. I really thought it was just mocho or slang for "big bullet."

    gatillo vs gatito
    esquadra vs cuadrada
    I stand corrected.

    Cacería is the correct word for hunting and I've occasionally heard it used, but if I had a peso for every time I've heard la tirada used in reference to a hunt...

    I've never heard anything but lente in reference to a scope nor anything but diana for target. I remember the first time I heard diana used was when I went shooting with a guy from Chiapas who spent his teenage years guarding the Guatemalan border with an HK.

    Thanks for the corrections. The THR database is better for it.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page