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Speer Grand Slam Bullet for Elk

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Tack4595, Jul 14, 2011.

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  1. Tack4595

    Tack4595 Member

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    Kamloops, BC, Canada
    Hi,
    As the title suggests is the Speer GS a good enough bullet for Elk?
    My rifle is a Ruger M77 MKII in .300 Winchester. I have been using 200 grain Accubonds and 180 grain Partitions but the price of these bullets is now through the roof. I want to try something different and less expensive.
    I typically hunt in mountains in the south east of BC, Canada. Most shots are within 300 yards but my concern is the structure of the bullet if I hit a rib or a shoulder.
    Many thanks in anticipation,
    Tack
     
  2. Huckelberry75

    Huckelberry75 Member

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    180 or 200 gn Sierra Gamekings are economical and give excellent results.
     
  3. Funshooter45

    Funshooter45 Member

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    I normally use Sierras myself, but a hunting partner of mine swears by 180 gr Speer Grand Slams for his 300 Win Mag. I have witnessed him shoot several elk ranging from 40 yards out to a bit over 300 and the bullet did a great job. He uses the same load, same bullet, same rifle whether we are hunting antelope, deer, elk, or moose. He sees no reason to change anything.
     
  4. denton

    denton Member

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    An ordinary cup and core bullet that impacts at more than 2800 FPS will have a strong tendency to create a short wound channel. With the 300, you have the potential to get into this problem with close-in shots.

    Grand Slams are better than cup and core bullets, but there are other choices that are better than the Grand Slam.

    I would suggest either a standard cup and core 200 grain bullet (slow enough to stay out of problems) or either a 180 or 200 grain Partition (won't fail above 2800 FPS).
     
  5. snuffy

    snuffy Member

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    The speer grand slam has changed since it was brought out. It used to have two hardness levels of lead. The back hard lead was poured in a molten state, then a soft front was poured in just as the rear core had hardened. This was supposed to fuse the two cores, similar to the Nosler partition. Then the point was formed.

    Now I understand that the core is all one type of lead, a little harder throughout. It's still a "hot core" in that the core is poured in molten.

    Rant on; I think that saving a few cents on bullets is silly economy! In the broad scope of what an elk hunting trip costs, the ammo isn't even one percent of the total. If you can't afford the bullets, you can't afford the trip/hunt. rant off.

    A good alternative to the GS is the Hornady interbond. A 180 interbond will retain 85% of it's weight and the cost is less that the accu-bond.
     
  6. Tack4595

    Tack4595 Member

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    Location:
    Kamloops, BC, Canada
    Hi,
    Since where I live is also where I hunt the cost of the "trip" is basically nothing other than a little gas.
    My reasons for changing from Nosler bullets is the bare-faced cheek of taking a box of 50 bullets, reducing them to boxes of 25 but charging two thirds the price of the original box of 50. This is price gouging, pure and simple.
    My reasons for changing are based on protest rather than anything else.
    Tack
     
  7. GooseGestapo

    GooseGestapo Member

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    I took a similar tack with my .300RUM. For "shooting" our smallish deer, I couldn't see the point of over $1 per bullet.
    I'd bought some mil-suplus powder for the .50BMG at 16lbs for $50. I'm loading the mighty .300RUM for less than it costs to load for my .260Rem.

    I tried some of the Remington 180gr Corlokts back when they were somewhat less expensive than they are now. (they are even more expensive than Speer's or Sierra's now!)

    I've gotten excellent accuracy from the lot of 500 that I bought. They seem to be from a better than average lot# that I'd used previously. They have held together at the rather fierce velocities of the .300RUM. Even intentionally body shooting a deer at ~40yds didn't give a bullet "blow-up".

    The Regular "hot-cor" bullets have given me excellent results too.

    But, given the current prices on bullets, I think that your best choice is going to be the Hornady 180gr Flat-base Interlok. Weatherby has been using these in their factory loaded ammo for decades and they have a good reputation for holding together. They are somewhat less expensive than the Speer "Grand-Slam" and will do just as well. I too, have had good results from the Sierra's. I actually find the CorLokts and Interloks to penetrate better than the Nosler Partitions from my limited use of the Partitions. I've seen the 100gr .257" partitions fail to completely penetrate a 100lb whitetail, and likewise a 140gr .284" failed to exit on a ~85lb doe with a 130yd angling lung shot. Excellent impact performance, but less penetration than I'd been lead to expect.

    I can also vouch for the Hornady 100gr Interlok from the .257Wby. I shot a doe at about 90yds with a handload at 3,550fps. The expanded bullet didn't exit but was just under the hide on the far side. Bullet weighed 67.5gr and didn't seperate. Perfect mushroom and interlok feature worked as advertised. I've never had a .30cal Interlok not exit a deer.

    I prefer to use bullets/loads that I don't cringe every time I pull the trigger due to the cost of the ammo. It gives me greater confidence to know that I've shot a few rounds at selected distances and have a good idea of how they actually perform..... I've seen too many "wonder-bullets" fail to perform as advertised.......

    Heck, I've got some .300RUM loads loaded with some Prvi-Partisan 150gr Spts @ 3,500fps and plan to see how they perform on some deer I'll be shooting off of an airport come October. They are 1.0-1.5moa and cheapest jacketed soft-point bullet on the market, (www.grafs.com).
     
  8. Huckelberry75

    Huckelberry75 Member

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    Speer's Deep Curl bullet is a bonded bullet. Might be worth looking at.
     
  9. Flatbush Harry

    Flatbush Harry Member

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    Looked at in the context of the total cost of a hunt, a box of Noslers that will last for quite a few hunts looks pretty cheap if they get the job done for you. I just loaded up and tested some 168gr Ballistic Tips for my .30-06s yesterday...a box of 50 BTs cost me $18.99, I used up 8 on the testing/sight-ins and have 42 primo rounds awaiting mule deer season.

    For me, the biggest expense of switching bullets is the cost of another reloading manual (j/k as the powder manufacturer's websites are free...BTW, I really like IMR 4350, IMR 4064 and Hodgdon's Varget in .30-06).

    FH
     
  10. j2crows

    j2crows Member

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    I never lost an elk that I hit with my 300 win. and Swift A-Frames.
     
  11. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    So by the time you develop a new load, you'll have spent far more than continuing with a current load that works

    There is NO such thing as price gouging when you have choices and do not have to buy these items
     
  12. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

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    I've killed just about everything with a Speer Hot core with no more than one shot. I've used the Grand Slam too with excellent results. Animals killed with both of those include elk, black bear, mule & white tail deer, and antelope. All of those were with a 130 gr. Hot Core BT from a .270 win. with exception being a couple with the Grand Slam. Both are excellent bullets for thick skinned animals, but for heavy boned and dense flesh like a bear, I would choose the GS.
    For my 7mm rem. mag. I'm currently using the 130 gr. Hot Core but changing to a Nosler Partition this coming season. I had two bad experiences last year with the Hot Core on mule deer. The mule deer both went down with one shot, but I wasn't real happy with the wound cavity and weight retention. The Hot Core bullets just exploded on bone, nothing like the performance I got with the .270 win. when using them? I think the velocity from the 7 mag was too much for those, thus causing too much expansion to quickly.
     
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