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Sprayed in the cheek

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by dashootist, Jun 20, 2010.

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  1. dashootist

    dashootist Member

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    Is it normal to occassional get sprayed in the cheek by tiny fragments? I have two revolvers, and they both do this. This would be bad as a defense gun because you don't always have time to put on your safety goggles before fighting evil doers.
     
  2. Drail

    Drail Member

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    No. There is a problem with the alignment of the barrel and cylinder. It should be repaired. (could be an expensive repair) Do not shoot it without proper protection and do not let anyone stand to the side while shooting it. I would either fix it or get rid of it. It's not going to be accurate with this problem.
     
  3. dashootist

    dashootist Member

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    It's a brand new gun! SW 686.
     
  4. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    I think the first response overstated things. It's not likely to be as serious as that, assuming we're talking about the very very tiny bits of debris that will sometimes flek you--rather than whole pieces of jacket. Revolvers will frequently hit you with microscopic shrapnel when shooting particular bullets. Just about every one I've ever owned will do it with one type of bullet or another. It's the result of minor variations between bullet types and their little disagreements with the forcing cone. There is also a possibility that the revolver is out of time, but that's not common with brand new revolvers. Not common AT ALL. And the fact that it's happening to both tells me you're just feeding them the same culpable bullets. Are you by chance shooting the light weight, high velocity jacketed rounds? Those frequently spit at me, which is one reason I prefer 158 or 180 grain rounds that don't do it.

    Also, with a brand new piece it may need to smooth out some chaffing points.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2010
  5. GP100man

    GP100man Member

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    Some ammo throws bits of powder residue out "the gap" !! Check the cyl. gap , I prefer
    .006 if more than .008 it needs attention. & check on both sides!

    Changeing brands or if ya reload change to a double based powder will help .
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2010
  6. wow6599

    wow6599 Member

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    I have had 3 NIB Rugers spray me like that. GP100 4", GP100 6" and a 3" SP101. The GP100's went back to Ruger and the problem was gone, also had much smoother triggers when they returned. My SP101 is only a month old and I will probably send it back for the face spray and free trigger job.
    Never had a 686 do that to me, but I've only had a couple and only one was new. Send it back.......S&W is tops in my book for customer service.
    YMMV
     
  7. BridgeTooFar

    BridgeTooFar Member

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    I had a Taurus Tracker in .357 that did this. I asked the range attendant about it, and he said it was normal for those to have "tight forcing cones" and that his did the same thing until he had about 1000 rounds through it (and it presumably stopped thereafter). Also said that the lanes (basically indoor range stalls) cause it to bounce back and hit you and that he never had the issue outdoors (as I never did either). I traded it on another gun before I put 1000 rounds through it, so I couldn't test his story.
     
  8. dashootist

    dashootist Member

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    Revolver 1: 38 Spl, 148 gr DEWC, 3.5 gr Unique
    Revolver 2: 22 LR Winchester 500 pack

    Revolver 3: 45 Colt, 250 RFNL, 9 gr Unique

    R1 occassionally spits at me; this is a new gun.
    R2 spits at me alot; and the Winchester ammo is really dirty.
    R3 never spits at me.


    Gap clearance is about 0.007 for R1.
     
  9. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    None of my numerous revolvers (Colt, Ruger, Smith, DW) do that, except for my NAA .22 Mag, which spits stuff everywhere.

    There will always be some amount of crap coming out sideways at the cylinder gap, but if it is coming back in your face, something is wrong.

    Naturally, clean burning loads have less crap to get loose sideways through the gap.
     
  10. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    With R1 you may just need to break it in. Shoot different types of ammo, as well.

    With R2 it try different ammo. I'd only worry if it's doing it with everything, all the time.
     
  11. GunsAreGood

    GunsAreGood Member

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    I get that with my Ruger GP100 only when I shoot PMC brand. I also get it when I shoot my Heritage Rough Rider.
     
  12. NoirFan

    NoirFan Member

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    Try switching the ammo first, that will be the cheapest solution if it works. My S&W sprays Magtech 158 grain semi jacketed magnums to the left every time but has no problems with any other ammo.
     
  13. Oyeboten

    Oyeboten Member

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    I have never experienced this...

    I would look carefully at how well the Cylinder Bores are aligning with the Forcing Cone and Barrel Bore when in Lock-up...while also looking carefully at the Ammunition.

    If it is Powder debris, or, metallic debris...you could take some Cardboard or Pasteboard, fold it into a rounded 'U' shape whose gap inside is maybe a foot, and, have it set up so you fire the Revolver in and through it...so it is centered on the Cylinder to Forcing Cone gap...and then see what sort of 'spray' characteristics you find, or things embedded into the Cardboard.
     
  14. Dave Markowitz

    Dave Markowitz Member

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    I was shooting my S&W Model 28-2 the other day. With W-W .38 Special 148 grain wadcutters or 125 grain .38 +P JHPs I had no spitting. With Remington 130 grain .38 Special Ball it did spit a little.
     
  15. Aunt Bee

    Aunt Bee Member

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    Oooh- THAT cheek!
     
  16. jhallrv4

    jhallrv4 Member

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    My S&W 686+ does this only with double-ended wad-cutters. It was a surprise for sure. No other FMJ, lead or plated bullets do it.

    Jeff
     
  17. Oyeboten

    Oyeboten Member

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    If holding the Revolver next to one's cheek while firing, doesn't one's arm feel cramped?

    ( Sorry, couldn't resist...)

    Seriously though...any debris from or behind the Bullet that can exit through the Cylinder to Forcing Cone gap, I am sure will do so...Lube, Unburned Powder, primer by-products.

    The bigger the Gap, the more room these things have to exit. Tighter and harder the Bullet meeting the Forcing Cone, the more time they have to exit also I would guess.

    Different Powder types, different Lube types, different loadings, different Bullet kinds, could make a difference.

    Smaller the Gap, the less difference those differences could make.
     
  18. Confederate

    Confederate Member

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    I get the feeling that too much is being made over this issue. If the B/C gap is within specs, I'd be more apt to blame the ammo or the direction the fan is blowing at the range.

    Everyone gets a little grit every now and then, but if it's a consistent problem, checking the timing would certainly be in order. It's a bit disconcerting that so many are reporting the problem, especially with Rugers.
     
  19. Rexster

    Rexster Member

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    I have handled NEW S&W revolvers that had timing issues. The sticky post at the top of this forum tells how to check out revolvers. S&W does have good Customer Service; too bad their QC is so lacking.
     
  20. rswartsell

    rswartsell Member

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    Every thread is an opportunity to flame whatever brand you have an issue with. I have been shooting revolvers for 40 years and I would definitely pay attention to being "sprayed" in the cheek with whatever debris from ignition, lead powder residue etc.

    To me it means a problem. There is always blast from the cylinder gap of even a correctly functioning revolver, but proper grip technique keeps you out of it's way. Having it end up on your cheek (apparently with some velocity) could I suppose be ammunition related but it would dang sure be the last of that ammunition I used.

    Having experience with many types of ammunition good and bad, and seeing from my experience debris hitting cheek as EXTREMELY unusual (hand maybe, but cheek? No way that's normal). I wouldn't be content until I found out why be it the gun or the ammo and corrected ASAP.

    You certainly SHOULD question the proper functioning of your gun AND become highly suspicious of the ammo if the gun checks out. Even with proper eye protection I would not trust this situation as safe at all. Wearing eye protection is insurance against unplanned events and finding it necessary consistently under "normal" operation is a problem.

    Did you simply notice your face was dirty after session (maybe direction of ventilation fan) or did you feel the sting of impact (under pressure of ignition)?
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2010
  21. dashootist

    dashootist Member

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    I feel a sting of tiny metal fragments in my lower left cheek. It's always lower left. I need to do more testing to narrow down which type of bullet is spraying. I've fired commerical 158 gr round nose as well as my own reload of 158 gr LSWC and 148 gr DEWC. This is my first S&W, and I was not expecting this many issues (other problem is occasional light strike) with a brand new gun.

     
  22. S&Wfan

    S&Wfan Member

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    A properly timed and adjusted revolver should not be "spitting" lead.

    Yours is new, contact Smith to have it sent back and adjusted. Period.
     
  23. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    Are you sure its metal? It could just be hot powder hitting you.
     
  24. Wolf Lies Down

    Wolf Lies Down Member

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    FIRST, I don't know how much experience you have. I also don't need to know, so don't be offended if you are a long-time shooter and know all this stuff. And, in not knowing, I feel compelled to tell you this: NEVER, EVER put your fingers close to the juncture of the front of the cylinder and the forcing cone (rear of the barrel) where the cylinder and the barrel meet. There is always some blowby there and you can injure yourself if you get your hands up there when firing the gun.

    However, there is no reason why you should be getting lead or jacket fragments in your face when you fire the gun. I've been shooting all my life and I've never had ANY of my revolvers do that! And, I've got a few of them, too.

    I'll also qualify the above statement by saying that I have always inspected my weapons exceptionally closely before I bought them and I stay away from junk, which category, unfortunately, S&W is starting to slide toward, in my opinion. If you are going to buy S&W, I recommend you buy an old, 1970's or earlier revolver in good to excellent condition and not the newer ones. Right out of the box at the gun shop you can see defects in them. There's too many good used ones out there to have to settle for a new S&W with the quality problems they are having. It's really sad.

    I would personally contact S&W, (don't be meek or they'll blow you off), complain loudly and demand they take the gun and fix it so that the problem you are experiencing does not happen. Demand they test fire the gun numerous times before they return it to you. You can simply package the gun well, insure it fully and send it to them via UPS; it is legal. ASK THEM TO send you a UPS call tag so they pick up the cost. They may or may not. ALSO, don't even BEGIN to suggest what you think might be wrong with the gun; just give them a full description of the symptoms.
     
  25. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Send it back. It's defective. It happens. I don't own a revolver that spits lead or powder like this. I'd get it fixed if I did, or in the case of the only one I ever owned that did this, a RG, I'd just throw it away. :D. A 686, I'd send back to the factory. You spent a lot of money for a defective revolver, but they'll make it right....I hope.
     
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