Quantcast
  1. Upgrade efforts paused for now. Thanks for your patience. More details in the thread in Tech Support for those who are interested.
    Dismiss Notice

Strength of Ruger GP100 in 38spl.

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by ChasMack, Sep 4, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. ChasMack

    ChasMack Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2011
    Messages:
    218
    I have seen a few Ruger GP 100's in 38 spl...+P also I think. I know plus P is more potent, but if you are reloading +P's, how hot of a +P can you go safely and can a Ruger take a steady diet of them? This is more for interests sake. I have never actually loaded +P, but I will probably start loading a few for my Ruger SP101's and see how they go. But since they are .357 I know there will be no problem. But the Ruger GP100 in 38spl seems quite robust. Is the Ruger GP100 in 38spl made the same as the .357, but just sized to shoot 38spl only??
     
  2. s4s4u

    s4s4u Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Yep
     
  3. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    Messages:
    11,635
    Location:
    Northwest Arkansas
    They arent even sized differently vs a 357 gp

    They just have a shorter chamber
     
  4. Tony_the_tiger

    Tony_the_tiger Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    905
    Fire away, that will stand up to any .38 + p for sure!
     
  5. Deer_Freak

    Deer_Freak Member.

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2012
    Messages:
    662
    Location:
    North Carolina
    I would get a 357 mag even if you plan to shoot 38 spl +p. You can resell a 357 mag if you need to raise cash. If you have a 38 spl you will lose a couple hundred. If a 38 is what you want buy a used S&W model 10 from buds. Someone will have to have the S&W. I have seen people pay a lot of money for a model 10. Why I have no clue! People want a 357 ruger because they are reasonably sure it is a good gun.
     
  6. PO2Hammer

    PO2Hammer Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    3,907
    Location:
    MINNESOTA
    A .38 spl GP100 will be no problem to sell, you may even get a better price for one than you would a 357 model. They are sought after by Ruger guys and always sell well.
     
  7. InkEd

    InkEd Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    2,575
    Location:
    Parts Unknown
    I've never seen one. Post a pic.
     
  8. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    26,820
    Location:
    Northeast PA, USA
    Just to answer that question directly, if you're loading .38 Special +P ammo using published load data from a trusted source I see no reason why you couldn't shoot as many as you want. The load data will produce ammo at or below the SAAMI max pressure limits for that cartridge. As long as your handgun is in proper working condition there will be no problems.

    Of course in this case you're actually shooting a revolver that can handle .357 Magnum pressures but that's not always the case with other revolvers.
     
  9. Sergei Mosin

    Sergei Mosin Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,918
    Ruger must have produced a run of these recently; I've seen them at a couple of shops around here. Blued, I think 3-inch barrels but maybe 4-inch. They show up as special runs once in a while. I don't see the appeal, but somebody must.
     
  10. Steve C

    Steve C Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Messages:
    4,861
    You would likely be mistaken if you believe that the .38 spl cylinder in the Ruger is capable of standing up to .357 mag pressures. Cylinders that are made for the .357 mag are generally hardened to withstand such pressures and since hardening takes time and adds cost to a part its unlikely that Ruger would do this to a cylinder that only needs to be safe with .38 spl +P. If you believe they would voluntarily go to an unneeded extra expense then you haven't worked for a manufacturing company that wants to stay in business by making a profit.

    Load to +P levels that you find in the current loading manuals or shoot commercial +P loads and you will be fine as that is what the gun is rated for by the manufacturer. Stray beyond these loads and you are risking damage to the gun that will not be repaired by Ruger. They will not repair any damage if you shoot hand loads or at least admit to it anyway regardless. You are not necessarily in danger of blowing up the gun, but shooting it loose or cracking the cylinder or barrel with overloads is possible.
     
  11. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    26,820
    Location:
    Northeast PA, USA
    I think you're right, I think they do come in a 3" barrel configuration. As to why, I have a guess. Since a 3" revolver is more likely to be carried and many shooters don't like the added recoil over the .357 Magnum revolvers like this would appeal to them. Not everyone is as well informed as we are because we shoot a lot and even reload. The misinformation out there is so bad I have has shooters ask me if .38 Special +P ammo can be fired in a .357 Magnum. The hype about the +P has them confused. They may think there is an advantage of buying a .38 Special over a Magnum. Again, this is just a guess on my part.
     
  12. Deer_Freak

    Deer_Freak Member.

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2012
    Messages:
    662
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Who is going to carry a 30 oz gun when there are literally hundreds of revolvers that weigh in around 20 oz that are just as capable as the GP100. The 38 spl is a special run and it is not as strong as the 357 standard model. To save people from making a bad choice conceal a brick for a couple days. You will then know what it's like to conceal a GP100. Ruger makes revolvers that are meant to be an EDC. They are not in the GP line up. They are in the SP line up.
     
  13. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    Messages:
    11,635
    Location:
    Northwest Arkansas
    In this instance the GP100 has exact same cylinder as 357.

    Many have been converted by either reaming or fitting another cyl. By in large these guns only exist because of customer contracts that specified 38.

    Shoot with confidence. A 38 gp is no alloy j frame
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2013
  14. mdauben

    mdauben Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2011
    Messages:
    2,490
    Location:
    Huntville, AL
    Lots of people, evidently. According to the Ruger website an unloaded 3" GP100 weighs 36 oz. I don't know exactly how much 6 x .357 cartidges adds, but for comparison a fully loaded Glock 21 weighs 38-40 oz (I've CC'd one at times) and a fully loaded 1911 weighs around 40-45 oz and lots of people carry those.

    As far as lighter revolvers being just as capable... well, there are lighter revolvers available that chamber .357 magnums, but many people find them much less controlable than heavier guns for follow up shots, especially with full-bore, 1400+ FPS magnum loads. Lighter guns are also typically only chambered for 5 rounds, instead of 6. There's certainly a place for both small and medium frame .357 but IMO the medium frame guns like the GP100 or S&W 686 have a place as carry pieces for people who prefer wheel guns.
     
  15. whughett

    whughett Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    Messages:
    4,678
    Location:
    Rhode Island
    Have shot unknown thousands of 38's through my GP 100, a hand full of 357's. For sure get the 357 even if you don't use that loading.
     
  16. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Messages:
    9,233
    Location:
    NW
    And I would say that a KLCR is a better option over an SP101.
     
  17. Carl N. Brown

    Carl N. Brown Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    Messages:
    10,165
    Location:
    Kingsport Tennessee
    My understanding is that the GP100 is made as a .38 Spl because some departments for whatever reason would not want to issue the dread 357 MAGNUM for publicity reasons.

    I do not believe the GP100 .38 cylinder to be compromised in steel quality or heat treatment; it would be more expensive on a mass production line to treat them differently, for one thing. I expect the difference is chamber depth only and would expect a .38Spl GP100 to shoot .38-44 Outdoorsman loads with ease.
     
  18. amd6547

    amd6547 Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,444
    Location:
    North Coast of OHIO
    "...conceal a brick for a couple days. You will then know what it's like to conceal a GP100. Ruger makes revolvers that are meant to be an EDC. They are not in the GP line up. They are in the SP line up..."

    Not to get too off thread, but I recently got a 3" GP100 357mag.
    I have been carrying it, equipped with OEM GP compact grips with no problem. I have been using a simple clip on IWB holster while I look for a good holster. Disappears under a loose T-shirt.
    Shoots much better than the 3" SP101 I owned a couple years ago, and better than the S&W model 19 that replaced the SP. we're to ever need to defend myself, I would for sure rather have the "brick" of the GP in my hand.
     
  19. ZVP

    ZVP Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Messages:
    937
    Who shoots in your family and what calibers?

    I shoot .38 Special <357 Magnium and >22 LR, I use 12 and 20 ga shotguns.
    HEre in Calif .22LR is a joke! You need to stay i]on the net and order per some buzzer alert program. Such a loss! I have some friends who reload or I;s]s'd be deqad in the water! I shoot conservativelly. Working on learning DA Shooting! Hard to do! Boy the panic buying and reduced manufacturiring had all but killed 22 ammo in the stores!
    Is this contrived by the antis? Are the manufacturers in in it?
    sure is strange!
     
  20. BSA1

    BSA1 member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Messages:
    7,492
    Location:
    West of the Big Muddy, East of the Rockies and Nor
    To Steve's comments in post 10 about Ruger not heat treating cylinders for chambering the 38 vs 357 the same.

    I think Ruger is using exactly the same heat treated cylinders for both calibers. It is simply a matter of economics of scale mass production and legal reasons.

    If Ruger heat treats cylinders for 38 Special they have to set up a special run, handle those parts and keep those parts separate along with extra paperwork and inventory control.

    And Lord help them if a cylinder heat treated only for lower 38 pressure accidentally got chamfer for 357 Magnum.

    On the other hand heat treat ALL the parts the same, stamp 38 Special on the gun and cut the chamber for the shorter 38. It eliminates a lot of unnecessary steps and as a result much cheaper.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2013
  21. Deaf Smith

    Deaf Smith Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2004
    Messages:
    4,708
    Location:
    TEXAS!
    Chas,

    Get some Buffalo Bore .38s for your GP100 in .38 SPL. Makes a .357 magnum out of it (well almost.) Out of my 2 3/4 inch Speed Six in .38 special it chromos a 158gr LSWHP at 1100 fps (yes eleven hundred.) Now if a Speed Six chambered for .38 can do that then a GP100 in .38 Spl. can do it even better!

    Plus you can handload it way up.

    Deaf
     
  22. CraigC

    CraigC Sixgun Nut

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    22,170
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    Unfounded, they are the same.
     
  23. dickydalton

    dickydalton Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2012
    Messages:
    2,050
    Location:
    New Mexico
    I have a GP100 38 Special marked GPNY, that was made for New York police but not issued to them. It's a bobbed hammer DA and it's sweet, now that I changed springs and honed it a bit.
    I have already shot some nasty reloads in it to test but now load it with normal 38 Specials because that's what I bought it for.

    I have 357s, 44s, 45s, a 460XVR, Black Powder and........
    The GP 100 38 is a fine revolver for what it was intended and if I need something else I'll use something else instead.:)
     
  24. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    26,820
    Location:
    Northeast PA, USA
    Just because you don't want to carry a 30oz revolver doesn't mean everyone will shy away from one. Like said above, there are plenty of people carrying heavier handgun than the GP100 daily. I know a few retired LEO's who bought their original service weapon, a 4" S&W M13 and they carry it daily now that they are retired. With a proper belt and a good holster you can carry almost anything comfortably.
     
  25. CraigC

    CraigC Sixgun Nut

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    22,170
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    I wouldn't consider the weight of a 30oz revolver to even be significant. My Kimber Ultra goes 32oz loaded and I forget it's there. I often carry a 4¾" SAA or 4 5/8" mid-frame Blackhawk in the cooler months and the lightest goes 36oz, the heaviest 42oz.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice