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Sub-moa wood rifle

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Tucker25, Sep 18, 2020.

  1. Tucker25

    Tucker25 member

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    Hi, im looking at getting a new rifle. I have looked a lot and cant find what i want so im hoping someone knows of a rifle. For the rifle, all i want is a nice (grade 2 or better) wood stock, bolt action 270. It needs to be sub-moa and I have a budget of $1,500. I need to be able to get the gun brand new. Thats it, go wild!

    And also, I dont like the weatherby vanguard, i think its ugly.

    Thanks,
    Tucker
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2020
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  2. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    A wood stocked rifle is just as likely to be MOA or better as a synthetic stock. The difference is that synthetic is going to be more stable under a wider range of conditions. As temperature, humidity and altitude change, wood stocks contract and expand. The rifle will probably always be MOA, but the point of impact will change. Sometimes it isn't enough to notice. Other times it can be several inches. For a rifle used primarily in one geographic location it may never be enough to matter.

    But for a hunter that travels it could. When I leave GA with temps in the 80's, humidity at 85%, and at 900' elevation the point of impact when I arrive in Colorado to hunt in temperatures in single digits, humidity at 10% and at 11,000' elevation is likely to be enough different to cause a miss with a wood stock. Much more likely to remain the same with synthetic. Plus synthetics are usually tougher and can be lighter.

    But there is no denying wood looks better. There are fewer companies using walnut at all anymore and it is rare to find a nice looking stick of wood on a factory rifle. I've seen some nice looking wood on some Bergara rifles. They look good, but when I hold them the shape is just off for me. Someone else may well love the feel. I think the Kimber's as a rule tend to have the nicest wood I've seen lately. Some of the Ruger Hawkeye's end up with some decent wood. Same with Winchester. Getting a decent wood stock is really just the luck of the draw. Sometimes you can go into a larger gun store and they may bring several out from the back and let you choose the one you think has the best looking wood.

    One other thing. The more figure the wood has, the more likely it is to have POI change or to split. The most accurate wood stocks are plain looking with straight grain and no figure to them.

    For a really nice piece of wood your $1500 budget will just barely cover the cost of a chunk of wood to make the stock.

    http://www.oldtreegunblanks.com/Rifle-English-Walnut.htm?woodid=1
     
  3. rayatphonix

    rayatphonix Member

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    A member of our hunting club has a Winchester Model 70 Super Grade. It meets all those criteria.
     
  4. Robert

    Robert Administrator Staff Member

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    I would look at a super grade as well. I don't know about the sub moa part, but it'll shoot better than most, not as good as some. The rifle might be able to shoot moa or better, but that is only one small part of the equation.
     
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  5. Tucker25

    Tucker25 member

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    My friend bought one, he hasn't been able to shoot it though but when he does I'll have to see what it can do accuracy wise.
     
  6. Tucker25

    Tucker25 member

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    ^

     
  7. rayatphonix

    rayatphonix Member

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    The one our member bought is sub-MOA. No question. It’s not a heavy barrel, however, and I wonder how it performs after it gets hot. As a hunting rifle I don’t see that as an issue.
     
  8. Garandimal

    Garandimal Member

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    Well...

    This early '80's M700 BDL .270 WCF, with a bubba glass beddin' job and handloads, shoots < 3/4 MOA.

    WP-20180617-11-54-18-Pro-2-crop.jpg
    NFS - but believe they made a few more of'em.

    :D




    GR
     
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  9. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    Winchester model 70 MAPLE
     
  10. SharpDog

    SharpDog Member

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  11. Dave DeLaurant

    Dave DeLaurant Member

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    When you say wood, are laminate stocks included? They offer most of the stability of a synthetic plus a reasonably traditional look -- laminates were becoming pretty common 75 years ago. You can make a laminated stock quite pretty -- ever see the Remington Model 7 full-stocked carbine?

    Model_Seven_Mannlicher.png
     
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  12. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    $998
    https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/tikka-t3x-hunter-270-winchester-bolt-action-rifle-115212610

    https://www.tikka.fi/cartridges#allrifles-wrapper

    The odds of a rifle shooting a 1.047” group exactly are pretty slim, and any group under that is by definition sub MOA.

    What do I win :)

    For looking at the Weatherby deluxe mark V’s have a sub MOA guarantee as well and have outstanding wood but new ones are a bit more than $1500.

    I know you said you don’t like them but they have nice wood and sub MOA guarantee on these for around $1k.

    https://weatherby.com/store/vanguard-deluxe/
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2020
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  13. sage5907

    sage5907 Member

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    The phrase of Sub-moa is somewhat illusive. What I am saying is that some manufacturers guarantee MOA accuracy with some pet load they have developed for that particular rifle. If you are buying a 270 Winchester you are probably expecting velocity in the range of 2900 to 3000 fps with either 130 or 140 grain bullets. The manufacturers may be coming up with that perfect load at a much lower velocity such as 2600 fps which you would probably never use. That being said, the 270 Winchester is one of the easiest cartridges I have owned when trying to find an accurate load. There are many powders and bullet combinations that will get you there. Powders like IMR 4831, H4350, Reloader 17 and Reloader 22 all have been great in my rifles as well as bullets made by Sierra, Speer and Berger. Brass preparation and attention to detail are needed in finding a consistently accurate load. I do like the Winchester Model 70 but I would make sure the rifle has a walnut stock.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2020
  14. gotboostvr

    gotboostvr Member

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    Yes please!
     
  15. Chuck R.

    Chuck R. Member

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    Hmmmmm, I've seen a rifle like that before!

    Oh, here it is:

    XaOSHTlh.jpg

    :D
     
  16. illinoisburt

    illinoisburt Member

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  17. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    It might piss you off, but really, I’m not certain I believe there is a bolt action model on the market right now from any of the major brands which I couldn’t make shoot sub-moa, especially given $1500 to buy it. I might even save back $500 and still have a really nice piece of wood. Pillar block, free float, and glass bed any wood rifle from Ruger, Savage, Remington, Weatherby, Howa, Tikka, etc would deliver this relatively low standard.

    Hell, a guy can buy a cheap bolt gun for $450, spend $150-500 for a very nice aftermarket wood stock, and still come in well under a $1500 budget, and still shoot sub-moa.
     
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  18. sage5907

    sage5907 Member

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    Winchester offers their Standard Model 70 with a walnut stock for $1,000, a Super Grade Model 70 with a walnut stock for $1,500, and a Super Grade Model 70 with a french walnut stock for $1960. These are suggested retail prices so you could probably buy one for 80% of that price. I don't know what you mean by grade 2 rifle, but these and new rifle prices and the Model 70 is a quality rifle. If you want a really pretty rifle take a look at the Winchester website and the french walnut model. There are many rifles on the market that are priced for the mass market but the Winchester rifles are priced for someone who wants something special. Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.
     
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  19. BWS

    BWS Member

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    I'd buy the rifle with a serviceable synthetic stock for hard hunting use. Then take my time to either make or buy a wood stock that checked the "figure" boxes.
     
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  20. Captcurt

    Captcurt Member

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    CZ's M550 can have some nice wood and the finish is excellent. I have had 2 Bergara B-14 Woodsmans. One had some nice fiddleback walnut and the other was as plain as a 2X4. Bergara's wood finish is not on the same par as CZ. The Winchester M70 Super Grade or the CZ 550 would be my pick in your price range. I like the Bergara actions and barrels but they need to learn how to finish wood.
     
  21. Jeef

    Jeef Member

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    jmr40, loved the post, very helpful to me in my own search. (Choosing between the synthetic and wood.)
    I've held both and for me the Winchester featherweight "fit" the best.
    So let me ask. If the barrel is free floated in the wood stock, is climate change still an issue?
     
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  22. Kingcreek

    Kingcreek Member

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  23. WisBorn

    WisBorn Member

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    @Tucker25 good luck in your quest to find a nice wood stock rifle! The biggest thing to watch is to make sure that the barrel channel doesn't swell.
    If you like the look of laminated wood it would be my second choice after a good synthetic stock.

    As @jmr40 mentioned the change in climate can greatly impact your rifle zero and synthetic and laminated stocks reduce those changes.
     
  24. Hangingrock

    Hangingrock Member

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    What is your capability. I've witnessed a lot of bench huggers that shoot of the bench, but standing up shooting from offhand not so good. A lot of people want a Sub-MOA rifle, but the shooters capability isn't up to the potential of the rifle. I've witnessed this over the decades of sight in days at one of the largest sportsmen's club in south-western PA when I was a resident there. You can't buy competency but you can become a better marksman thru usage shooting from field positions.
     
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  25. Gojo03

    Gojo03 Member

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    I would pick up a Remington 700 CDL stainless fluted. Probably have enough left for a good scope too
     
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