Substitute Shotgun Ammunition

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by Terry G, Nov 10, 2021.

  1. Terry G

    Terry G Member

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    I hunt Upland Birds with Remington 12 Gauge number 7 1/2 high brass rounds. Unfortunately, try to find some. So I bought comparable shells of Aguila and Herter's manufacture. Surprise, surprise, they won't function in my Browning A-5 or Remington 1100. I don't know if they are lighter on powder or what. If your shooting a Semi Automatic be advised.
     
  2. rust collector
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    rust collector Moderator Staff Member

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    IIRC, the A-5 has friction rings that can adjust the gun to work with lighter or heavier loads. You should be able to try different configurations to get one that will work. https://www.browning.com/support/faq/rings-auto-5.html
     
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  3. Terry G

    Terry G Member

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    Thanks. Your right. One of those things I forgot.
     
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  4. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    The 1100 should work with a wide variety of loads. I find that interesting.
     
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  5. rust collector
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    rust collector Moderator Staff Member

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    I have no experience with 1100s, but understood that the 1187 was designed to accommodate a wider range of loads. I would not expect a small difference in pressure/velocity/loading to cause problems, but apparently there were enough issues to cause the redesign in 1987. That would have been about the time that the Beretta 303 was in the market, and our game & fish guys noted that they ate almost anything without adjustment. They were the preferred gun for shooting coyotes from super cubs back then. Apparently Remington felt the heat, but their "solution" still required different barrels. Since then, self regulating designs have proliferated.

    OP, I am guessing that your high base 7 1/2 load may have been high velocity or heavy charge, what we used to call short magnums. The recent rounds probably generate less pressure and therefore don't cycle the piston quickly enough to open the bolt fully. A gunsmith might be able to open the port enough to fix this, but then reverting to a snortier load would beat the gun up.
     
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  6. entropy

    entropy Member

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    Base height is nothing. In factory ammo, it serves to identify field loads from target loads. Reloaders can use the same AA or STS hull they load Trap loads in for smoking hot Pheasant and duck loads. Some use them for Annie Oakley loads, also. ;)

    Try some Fiocchi field loads, they are quite stout. Golden Pheasants will function any auto.
     
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  7. PapaG

    PapaG Member

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    Every 1100 I've had, six or seven IIRC, would function with anything from 1 oz up through the old 2 3/4 "duck" loads. Be sure the gas ports are clean, the mag tube is clean and lightly oiled. If it is a 3" gun, too bad
     
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  8. Fine Figure of a Man

    Fine Figure of a Man Member

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    And check the O-ring
     
  9. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    The 11-87 was designed to work with both 2 3/4" and 3" shells. In theory more versatile. But those proved to be less reliable with very light field loads. They usually work with 1 1/8 oz or heavier loads, but would often choke on lighter 1 oz loads. Barrel length mattered too. Those with 26" barrels were more likely to choke on light loads than the ones with 28" barrels since the gas had more time to build up pressure to cycle the action. The ones with barrels shorter than 26" were designed to only use magnum shells.

    The 1100 could be had with either 2 3/4" chambers OR 3" chambers. The ones with 2 3/4" chambers were extremely reliable with all 2 3/4" shells over a wide range of power levels, but could not be used with 3" shells. The ones with 3" chambers would work with all 3" shells, but only magnum 2 3/4" shells. They would not function with common field loads.
     
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  10. Beach Bum

    Beach Bum Member

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    My grandpa's 1100 3" magnum in 20 guage barrel came with one gas port . I had to buy another barrel from corsons with two ports , couple of hundred bucks , now it shoots 2 3/4" flawlessly , but if you want to shoot magnums put the magnum barrel with one port back on..My Granpa loved that gun but was frustrated by that problem I wish he was still alive to shoot it now ,it was such an easy fix , He would be happy , happy , happy,
     
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  11. Master Blaster

    Master Blaster Member

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    Is there a rubber O ring on your gas Tube on your 1100?
    If it's missing the gun will only work with highbrass or magnum loads.
     
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  12. rust collector
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    rust collector Moderator Staff Member

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    Here is a video for gas seal replacement. Note that the seal has to work in an environment that is subject to high heat and oils/solvents. That means that it is not a standard (buna) 0 ring, but one made specially to work under these conditions. IIRC, Remington tells you not to lube the gas assembly, and that is probably to avoid any kind of potential for a fire or a buildup of carbon. I have read that a light lube application is common among clay shooters, so will leave that to your discretion. It requires very minimal lube, if any, but periodic cleaning is a relatively easy job and the more frequently done, the less stubborn any buildup will be.
     
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  13. Terry G

    Terry G Member

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    No, and the gun works fine with low brass Remington. .
     
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