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Suggestion for smooth-faced 1911 triggers [gov't sized]

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by 357-8-times, Dec 6, 2007.

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  1. 357-8-times

    357-8-times Member

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    My S&W trigger serations are pretty rough and course around the set-screw-hole and is eating up my fingertip.

    It does not seem like sanding it down would be as easy as just putting in a new trigger- thoughts? :confused:

    I would like a good trigger with a smooth face, the more adjustments possible the better. I do not care if it has lightning holes or skeletonized or whatever, just not solid. Suggestions?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Geno
    • Contributing Member

    Geno Member

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    Replacement triggers are really not expensive. Choose your style and drop it in. Good luck.

    Doc2005
     
  3. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Doc is right concerning a replacement trigger, but since the fingerpiece is made (I believe) out of aluminum I would simply remove it, take a piece of sandpaper, wrap it around my fingertip, and smooth those sharp serrations. Not hard too do, and far less costly then a new trigger,
     
  4. 357-8-times

    357-8-times Member

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    The sharp points are surrounding the overtravel set screw hole, apparently the serations broke about 1mm below the hole when the drilled/tapped it at S&W; so it is not exactly an easy place to sand down.
     
  5. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    I understand the problem - been there, done that... :(

    You can use a piece of 1" round dowell with course emery cloth or paper wrapped around it to get to the bottom of the serrations. Then use finer grit cloth/paper to finish the job. Finely, lightly countersink the screw hole with a hand-held larger drill to remove sharp edges. I find that all of this takes about 20 minutes, excluding the time to take apart and reassemble the pistol.

    One other trick I've used in the past. Run the set screw further down into the fingerpiece (you may hae to shorten the screw to make it work) and then put a short 6-48 screw of the kind used to fill scope mount holes in rifle receivers on top of it. Most any gunsmith that mounts riflescopes would probably give you one. This brings the screwhead up flush with the trigger face regardless of where the adjusting screw is set.

    One final point: If the pistol is going to be used as a weapon, or even might be, I remove the screw and pitch it. Should it work its self backwards it can tie up the gun and you can't fire it. This happens more frequently then you might think.
     
  6. Spartacus451

    Spartacus451 Member

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    And then the gun might start doubling and tripling because the grip safety fails to prevent the trigger bow from moving too far back. Some form of trigger stop is a necessity on some modern production guns.

    The best thing to do is ditch the Smith for a nice pre 60s era Colt right? :neener:

    Between the Swartz style safety and the .125 wide extractor that is centered at the firing pin instead of slightly below, I would not be worrying about the over travel screw.
     
  7. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Absolutely not!! Those are reserved for the (greedy) Old Fuff... :D

    I admit I'm not very keen about S&W's version of the 1911 platform, but I believe they use a conventional trigger that is purchased from a vendor - who must not have ever looked at the USGI blueprint. Dimensions and tolerances mean nothing... :(
     
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