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Suppressor: Aluminum Baffle Cleaning

Discussion in 'NFA Firearms and Accessories' started by <*(((><, Jan 28, 2019.

  1. <*(((><
    • Contributing Member

    <*(((>< Luke

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    Like the title says what does everyone use for their suppressors with aluminum baffles?

    On Gemtech's website for their GM22 they recommend the following:

    What solvents should I use or avoid using for cleaning?
    Make certain that any solvent you choose is safe for the material your suppressor is made of. Avoid solvents that contain ammonia (Hoppes 9 and many bore cleaners) when cleaning aluminum suppressors. We also recommend against using water based cleaners in our suppressors.

    Our recommended cleaners:
    - Gunzilla: http://www.topduckproducts.com

    - Ed's Red (home made): Equal parts of Mineral Spirits, Acetone, Kerosene, and Automatic Transmission Fluid.

    If you wish to clean your suppressor you may submerge it in one of the solvents listed above. Soak it for 24-48 hours, remove and allow to drain. Once drained, blow the inside of the suppressor dry with compressed air. This cleaning can be helpful in the case of pistol suppressors that are fired "wet" to help remove any buildup of ablative grease, etc.
    The carbon is easy to remove, what about the buildup of lead? What's everyone's choice on lead buildup removal?

    PLEASE DO NOT COMMENT ON CLEANING SUPPRESSORS THAT ARE NOT MADE WITH ALUMINUM, THIS THREAD IS SPECIFIC TO A SUPPRESSOR USING ALUMINUM INTERNALS.


    I will be making some threaded PVC solvent soak pipes to soak the baffle stack in, and am planning on trying out Gemtech's recommendation of "Ed's Red". I realize that utilizing a plastic pick is essential in this process as well, but wanted to get everyone's pet cleaner for aluminum suppressors.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. pdsmith505

    pdsmith505 Member

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  3. <*(((><
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    <*(((>< Luke

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    I use SS pins to clean brass, I’m just a little hesitant on a suppressor baffle as stainless steel is harder than 7075 aluminum. I’ve been looking into plastic and ceramic media that’s spec’d for 7075 and that’s the closest idea that makes sense to me other than soda blasting. But I don’t have a soda blaster.
     
  4. pdsmith505

    pdsmith505 Member

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    That's quite reasonable since, unlike empty cases, you can't simply replace your baffles if they are damaged by the stainless media.

    But I haven't head of any significant issues with the media harming brass, or baffles (well, I did read about threads getting a little goofy if they were present) for that matter.
     
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  5. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    Negative. Do not abrasive blast. You'll strip the anodizing, which they absolutely need.

    When it's cleaning time, I just shoot a couple magazines running the can wet (water, not other ablatives), and then promptly clean with hot water & dish soap. You'd be amazed how effective that is.
     
  6. <*(((><
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    <*(((>< Luke

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    I was hoping you would comment.

    Currently the can has a decent amount of lead buildup at the muzzle end. So forgive my ignorance, what’s the procedure for running it wet? Just a spray bottle and mist the internals, thread it on and run a few mags? Sounds too easy, and fun to boot!
     
  7. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    IMO, best way is a syringe with a tube. I use about a tsp. in pistol cans, but rimfires are smaller, so half a tsp. or so (Syringes are usually marked in cc, appx. 5cc to a tsp.). Just slowly depress the plunger as you draw the tube through the can, swirl it around a bit, then shoot. 10-20 rounds is good, more than than, you'll dry it out. Then clean ASAP. Since we're talking about rimfire, most people would be able to do the pre-clean wet firing in their back yard or garage, go straight to the sink. It won't do a lot for the lead, but much of the carbon will slough right off, most of the rest will scrub easily with a stiff toothbrush.

    One thing you definitely don't want to do is fire wet and then leave it sit for a significant period. Anyplace where the anodizing is worn or there's otherwise exposed aluminum will corrode quickly in that environment of moisture, oxygen and leftover salts.

    I wouldn't worry too much about the lead build up at the front, it isn't going to affect performance. Odd Job has tormented some rimfire cans with tens of thousands of rounds, never cleaning them. They gain significant weight, but still suppress effectively.
     
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  8. <*(((><
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    <*(((>< Luke

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    Thank you for explaining it. I'll try it out.
     
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